The Master of Arts (M.A.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) programs also permit specialization in Aboriginal Studies.

Master of Arts in Anthropology

The master’s program in anthropology provides many opportunities to pursue graduate work in Aboriginal studies. The program focuses on the IMG_9190social and cultural other, including its popular and scholarly representations. There are three areas of specialization:

  • The Anthropology of Signs and Symbols
  • North American Native Studies
  • The Anthropology of Development and Underdevelopment

The following sample of thesis titles illustrate the way in which you can pursue Aboriginal studies within these areas of specialization:

  • “Discourse in the Sun Dance War, 1880-1914” (1995)
  • “Medicine Wheels: Tools of Adaptation in Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Society” (1995)
  • “Beaded Radical and Born–Again Pagans: Situating Native Artists Within the Field of Art” (1995)
  • “Bartering for Leviathan: The Whale Resource Negotiations Between the Inuit Circumpolar Conference and the International Whaling Commission: A Case of Cross-Cultural Negotiation” (1996)
  • “Touching the Heavens: The Carving and Raising of a Contemporary Nisg’a Totem Pole” (1996)
  • “So I Can Hold My Head High: History and Representation of the Oka Crisis” (1997)
  • “The Life Histories of Two Inuvialuk Women from the Western Arctic” (1998)
  • “Indigenous Cultural Tourism: An Examination of Process and Representation in Canada and Australia” (2000)

In addition to the graduate courses in anthropology, students in the master’s program are permitted to select 1.0 credit in a related discipline.

Prerequisites: The requirement for admission into the M.A. program in Anthropology is an Honours bachelor’s degree or the equivalent, with at least high honours standing. Where relevant, previous professional experience may be taken into account in determining standing on admission.

Remarks: There is a strong Aboriginal focus in anthropological studies at Carleton University. Anthropology professors at Carleton are currently engaged in a wide range of research within the four departmental foci: symbolic anthropology, applied anthropology, Native studies, development and underdevelopment. Current research projects include:

  • the experience of off-reserve Native people in Canadian cities;
  • ethnicity, violence, and self-determination in Papua, New Guinea;
  • the establishment of industrial schools as a practice of domination/regulation in the Northwest Territories in the 1800s;
  • ritual and meditation systems;
  • the relationship between Maori and the criminal justice system;
  • Maori science claims and comparsions with indigenous efforts in Canada;
  • firearms and society;
  • cross-cultural, experiential and theoretical perspectives on the study of consciousness;
  • transpersonal anthropology, neuroanthropology, and semiotic research;
  • ecological anthropology and sustainable development: relationships between ecology and policy;
  • the role of cosmology in Navajo healing.

Carleton’s location in the nation’s capital, Ottawa, gives you ready access to a wealth of resources. Ottawa is the location of some 20 Aboriginal organizations, for example: The Aboriginal Rights Coalition, The Assembly of First Nations, the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples, The Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, The Grand Council of Crees of Quebec, The Metis National Council, The Metis National Council of Women, The Pauktuutit (Inuit Women’s Association).

In addition, the National Archives of Canada and the National Library are important sources of documents, records, and statistical information on many aspects of Aboriginal life and culture. The libraries of federal government departments and agencies also possess unique materials relating to specific problems.

For more information Contact:

Department of Sociology and Anthropology
Telephone: (613) 520-2600 Ext  2587;
Fax: (613) 520-4062;
E-mail: paula_whissell@carleton.ca

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Master of Arts in Canadian Art History (with a focus on Aboriginal Peoples)

The School for Studies in Art and Culture offers a master’s program in which students can focus on the art and architecture of Aboriginal peoples in Canada. This is a five-credit program consisting of one full credit for the required core seminar, “The Practice of Canadian Art History,” two full credits for the thesis, and the remaining two credits chosen from among a variety of art history seminars and graduate practicum placements within collecting institutions. In choosing these two credits students must include a minimum of two and a maximum of three of the five areas: Euro-American tradition, Aboriginal peoples including Inuit, architecture, photography, and folk and popular arts.

The following sample of thesis titles illustrate the types of study pursued by students in this program:

  • “Native Women and Work: Changing Representations in Photographs from the Collections of the National Film Board and the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development” (1995)
  • “These Things are Our Totems: Marius Barbeau and the Indigenization of Canadian Art and Culture in the 1920s” (1995)
  • “Agents of Change: new Architectural Process in British Columbia First Nations Schools” (1998)
  • “Carving Out a Future: Contemporary Inuit Sculpture of Third Generation Artists from Arviat, Cape Dorset and Clyde River” (1999)

Prerequisites: To be admitted to the master’s program applicants must hold an Honours B.A. (or the equivalent) in art history or a related discipline with at least high honours standing. Related disciplines are anthropology, Canadian history and Canadian studies. Applicants without a background in art history may be required to take up to a maximum of 2.0 credits in certain designated courses from the undergraduate art history program in addition to their regular program.

Remarks: Students in the Master’s of Arts in Art History focusing on Aboriginal creative production and aesthetic culture have opportunities to earn course credit for practicum courses in the many institutions in the national capital region, to carry out original research in their collections and to work with their specialists.

Ottawa’s collecting institutions and libraries include: National Gallery of Canada, Canadian Museum of Civilization, National Archives of Canada, National Library, National Research Council of Canada Libraries, Canadian Conservation Institute, Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography, Parks Canada, the Indian Art Centre, Department of Indian and Northern Affairs, and the Carleton University Art Gallery. Also within easy reach are the museums of Montreal (Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, McCord Museum, Museum of Contemporary Art) and Toronto (Art Gallery of Ontario, Royal Ontario Museum, Sigmund Samuel Canadiana Gallery, The Power Plant).

A Note: On January 26, 2001, after a national search, Carleton University appointed Allan J. Ryan to the first university research chair in Canada to specialize in Aboriginal art and culture. The University’s goal in establishing this research chair is to enable the development of a generation of scholars in the field of Aboriginal art and culture. Ryan’s appointment will give students in Canadian Art History and other programs at Carleton University the opportunity of working with a modern scholar who has a unique and humane approach to the study of contemporary Native art.

For more information Contact:

School for Studies in Art and Culture
Telephone: (613) 520-2342
Fax: (613) 520-3575)
E-mail:  ssac@carleton.ca

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Master of Arts in Canadian Studies

The Master’s program in Canadian Studies is interdisciplinary in emphasis. Students can follow a range of interests including Aboriginal Studies, Women Studies, Cultural Policyand Heritage Conservation. The following sample of thesis titles illustrates the types of study relating to Aboriginal Studies and the North:

  • “Self-Determination: Protecting the Rights of Aboriginal Peoples in Urban Areas” (1995)
  • “Our Native Peoples”: The Illegitimacy of Canadian Citizenship and the Canadian Federation for the Aboriginal Peoples (1999)
  • “Aboriginal Rights”: A Comparative Analysis of Anishinaabe and Canadian Liberal Traditions (1999)
  • “Humour is Good Medicine: The Algonquin Perspective on Humour in Their Culture and of Outsider Constructions of Aboriginal Humour” (2000)
  • “INWAYWINAN: Aboriginal Language Loss – At What Cost?” (2001)

In addition to the graduate courses offered by the School, students in the master’s program are encouraged to select courses related to their program offered by a range of departments (with 1.0 credit at the 4th year undergraduate level being permitted).

Prerequisites: The same conditions and requirements apply as in other program areas of the master’s program (see below). However, special consideration may be given to candidates who have extensive knowledge of the north or of Aboriginal peoples. The language requirement of the program may also be satisfied by a demonstrated knowledge of an Aboriginal language.

Admission Requirements: Applicants to the master’s program must normally hold an Honours B.A. (or the equivalent) with at least high honours standing, in one of the disciplines represented at the School of Canadian Studies. These include: Architecture, Anthropology, Art History, Economics, English, Film Studies, French, Geography, History, Journalism and Communication, Law, Linguistics and Applied Language Studies, Mass Communications, Music, Political Science, Psychology, Public Administration, Social Work, Sociology, and Women’s Studies.

Remarks: Carleton University’s Master of Arts in Canadian Studies was the first of its kind to be established in Canada 44 years ago. This interdisciplinary program was specifically designed to provide a more complete understanding of the complex issues facing Canadian society than can be gained in studies based in a single discipline or field. By combining access to professional expertise and archival resources in Ottawa within an academic master’s degree, your research in the areas of cultural studies, Aboriginal studies, women’s studies, and heritage conservation engages directly with contemporary Canadian problems and issues.

For more information Contact:

School of Canadian Studies
Telephone: (613) 520-2366
Fax: (613) 520-3903)
E-mail: canadian_studies@carleton.ca

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Master of Arts in Legal Studies

The master’s program in legal studies affords opportunities to pursue graduate work in Aboriginal studies within one of six main areas:

  • Legal Theory and Social Theory
  • Law, Crime and Social Order
  • Women, Law and Gender Relations
  • Political Economy of Law
  • International and Comparative Legal Regimes
  • Social History of Law

The following sample of thesis titles illustrate the way in which you can pursue Aboriginal studies within these areas:

  • “Community Alternatives and Youth Justice: Needs, Interests, and Obstacles” (1994)
  • “Interests and the Public Interest in Law and Public Policy: A Case Study in Aboriginal Policy in Canada” (1995)
  • “Talkin’ About a Revolution: Discourse, Aboriginal Justice and the Possibility of Empowerment” (1996)
  • “First Nations, The Church, State and Image: Policy and Ideals Reflected in the Indian Act of 1876” (1997)
  • “A Search for Justice in First Nations Communities: The Role of the R.C.M.P. and Community Policing” (2000)
  • “The ‘Noble Savage’ in Western Thought: Reconstituting Colonial Stereotypes in Sentencing Aboriginal Sex Offenders” (2001)

In addition to the graduate courses offered by the Department, students in the master’s program are encouraged to select a .5 credit in a related discipline (to be chosen in consultation with your supervisor). A list of related courses is contained in the Graduate Calendar entry for this program (see Carleton University Website http://www.carleton.ca.)

Prerequisites: The requirement for admission into the M.A. program in Legal Studies is an Honours bachelor’s degree or the equivalent, with at least high honours standing. Where relevant, previous professional experience may be taken into account. Applicants without a background in law may be required to complete one or more designated courses, including Law 51.397 Legal Research methods from the department’s undergraduate program before taking courses towards the master’s degree.

Remarks: The M.A. in Legal Studies reflects the growing demand for legal studies outside the professional LL.B., placing law and legal issues within a social context. Our courses move beyond the study of legal rules, to examine what we know about the law and how it works in our society. You’ll acquire knowledge of the underlying dynamics of law and legal studies, including an in-depth understanding of its rules, agents, institutions, and power structures. Studying law in all these different facets is what defines the strength of the programs at Carleton.

The location of the M.A. program in Legal Studies at Carleton provides students with a wealth of resources for research purposes. As well as the resources of the MacOdrum Library, students will have access to extensive Canadian and international research material through the Social Science Data Archives located at Carleton.

The Library of the Supreme Court of Canada, the National Library, the National Archives, the Library of Parliament, Statistics Canada, and the Centre for Justice Statistics are all located in Ottawa. Ottawa houses many federal government departments and agencies, as well as the national headquarters of non-governmental organizations such as the Elizabeth Fry Society, the John Howard Society, and the National Association of Women and the Law. Many government departments and non-governmental organizations maintain specialized libraries, and offer access to documents and other research materials.

For more information Contact:

Department of Law
Telephone: (613) 520-2600 Ext. 7596
Fax: (613) 520-4467
E-mail: law@carleton.ca

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Master of Arts in Sociology

The master’s program in sociology provides many opportunities to pursue graduate work in Aboriginal studies. Students in the program normally select one of four main areas:

  • Theory and Methodology
  • Social Stratification and Power
  • Cultural and Gender Studies
  • Comparative Institutions

The following thesis titles illustrate the way in which you can pursue Aboriginal studies within one of these areas:

  • “Aboriginal Police Services Boards: An Examination of the Effect of State Funding on the Development of Culturally Relevant Policing” (1996)
  • “Deconstructing Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: A Critical Inquiry into the Discourse Around Alcohol, Women, Ethnicity, Aboriginals and Disease” (1997)

In addition to the graduate courses offered by the School, students in the master’s program are encouraged to select a .5 credit in a related discipline (to be chosen in consultation with your supervisor). In certain circumstances up to 1.0 credit may be taken at the undergraduate level. A list of related courses is contained in the Graduate Calendar entry for this program.

Prerequisites: The requirement for admission into the M.A. program in Sociology is an Honours bachelor’s degree or the equivalent, with at least high honours standing. Where relevant, previous professional experience may be taken into account in determining standing on admission.

Remarks: The principal focus of the graduate programs in sociology is the organization and development of contemporary societies in comparative context and with particular reference to Canadian society.

For more information contact:

Department of Sociology and Anthropology
Telephone: (613) 520-2600 Ext 2587
Fax: (613) 520-4062
E-mail: paula_whissell@carleton.ca

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