NOTES: If you want to take a course that isn’t listed, please email Michelle Santoianni to ensure it counts as an arts or social science elective. Students must be mindful of the prerequisite(s) required for the courses below.

All ANTH courses…Environment related course below:

ANTH 3355 [0.5 credit]
Anthropology and the Environment

Environmental concerns affect everyone, unevenly. How does anthropology illuminate the cultural, social, political and ecological differentiation resulting from and constituting environmental processes? The range of responses considered may address issues of resource access and exploitation, as well as transnational transformations in the concept of nature.Prerequisite(s): 1.0 credit in ANTH, SOCI, GEOG, ENST or INDG and second-year standing. Lectures three hours a week.

ECON 3803 [0.5 credit]
The Economics of Natural Resources
The application of economic analysis to questions concerning natural-resource use, management and conservation, as well as market failures and environmental effects. Policy problems relating to natural resources are discussed. Precludes additional credit for ECON 3805 (no longer offered).  Prerequisite(s): ECON 1000 or FYSM 1003. Lectures three hours a week.

ECON 3804 [0.5 credit]
Environmental Economics
Microeconomic analysis of environmental issues. Frameworks for measuring environmental costs and benefits. The efficiency of alternative pollution control policies. Applications include air and water pollution and global environmental problems such as ozone depletion and global warming. Precludes additional credit for ECON 3806 (no longer offered).Prerequisite(s): ECON 1000 or FYSM 1003.Lectures three hours a week.

ENST 1020 [0.5 credit]
People, Places and Environments
Introduction to human geography. Examination of relationships between people, communities, society and the natural environment at local to global scales. Population change, cultural patterns, and historical, economic, political and environmental forces that shape human activity and experiences from place to place. Also listed as GEOG 1020.
Lectures two hours a week and tutorial one hour a week.

ENST 2000 [0.5 credit]
Nature, Environment and Society: Theoretical Perspectives
Examination of the shifting understandings of nature, the environment, and nature-society relations. Topics include nature as a concept, people’s relationships to the environment across the globe, environmental movements and institutions, narratives of environmental change, and political ecology approaches to understanding and combating environmental degradation.Prerequisite(s): second-year standing in the Environmental Studies program or permission of the Department. Lectures three hours a week.

ENST 2001 [0.5 credit]
Sustainable Futures: Environmental Challenges and Solutions
Individual and collective responses to pressing environmental problems. Innovative ways in which the environment can be protected and restored, taking into consideration socioeconomic, political and cultural factors. Topics include environmental lifestyles, sustainable communities, food systems, environmental design, and political activism. Prerequisite(s): second-year standing in the Environmental Studies program or permission of the Department. Lectures, seminars and field work three hours a week.

ENST 2005 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to Qualitative Research
Introduction to the research process, from generating questions through to reporting results. Topics include intensive and extensive research approaches; the use of surveys, interviews and other data collection methods; the analysis of qualitative information; and the ethical dimensions of doing research with people and communities.Also listed as GEOG 2005.
Prerequisite(s): 1.0 credit in GEOG or ENST at the 1000-level and second-year standing, or permission of the Department.
Lectures two hours a week, workshop two hours a week.

ENST 2500 [0.5 credit]
Climate Change: Social Science Perspectives
An introduction to climate change, with an emphasis on human dimensions. Topics include anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, regional variations in climate change and their consequences, human vulnerability and adaptation to environmental change, and climate change politics and policies at a variety of geographic scales. Also listed as GEOG 2500.Prerequisite(s): ENST 1020 or GEOG 1020, or second-year standing. Lectures three hours a week.

ENST 3022 [0.5 credit]
Environmental and Natural Resources
Exploration of complexity, dynamics, uncertainty and equity issues underpinning environmental and resource issues; review and appraisal of selected contemporary methods to assess and manage environmental and natural resources. Also listed as GEOG 3022. Prerequisite(s): third-year standing in Geography or Environmental Studies or permission of the Department.
Lecture three hours a week.

ENST 4006 [0.5 credit]
Environmental Policy Analysis
Critical examination of the creation, implementation and effectiveness of government policies related to environmental issues. Emphasis on perspectives, actors, institutions and social and economic relationships affecting policy responses to these issues, and on tools for analyzing the implications of specific policy choices. Prerequisite(s): fourth-year Honours standing in Environmental Studies, Geography, or permission of the Department. Seminar three hours per week.

EURR**European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (All Courses)

FREN **French Language Courses (All Courses)

GEOG 1020 [0.5 credit]
People, Places and Environments
Introduction to human geography. Examination of relationships between people, communities, society and the natural environment at local to global scales. Population change, cultural patterns, and historical, economic, political and environmental forces that shape human activity and experiences from place to place. Also listed as ENST 1020.Lectures two hours a week and tutorial one hour a week.

GEOG 2014 [0.5 credit]
The Earth’s Surface
Introduction to geomorphology. Weathering, slope and fluvial processes within drainage basins, and glacial and periglacial processes. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 1010 or ERTH 1006 or ISCI 1001.
Lectures three hours a week, laboratory three hours a week.

GEOG 2020 [0.5 credit]
Physical Environments of Canada
Canada’s physiography, climates, biogeography, soils, and landforms. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 1010 or ERTH 1006 or ERTH 1010 or ISCI 1001.Lectures three hours a week.

GEOG 2200 [0.5 credit]
Global Connections
Globalization and global environmental change as linked processes. Geographical analysis of economic, cultural and political transformations acting at global, national and local scales. Choices and constraints underlying economic, social and environmental sustainability. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 1020 or ENST 1020, or second-year standing. Lectures three hours a week.

GEOG 2300 [0.5 credit]
Space, Place and Culture
Introduction to social and cultural geography, including how theories of space, place, landscape, power, and knowledge can be used to understand the geographic dimensions of social and cultural life. Topics include culture and identity, migration and transnationalism, nature, gender, sexuality, race, colonialism, consumption, and work. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 1020 or ENST 1020, or second-year standing. Lectures two hours a week, discussion one hour a week.

GEOG 2400 [0.5 credit]
Cities and Urbanization
Introduction to the study of cities, urbanization and suburbanization. Examines the geography of urban experience, development and change across the globe. Urbanization processes, patterns and issues in different cities and regions; the relationships among urban areas. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 1020 or ENST 1020, or second-year standing. Lectures three hours a week.

GEOG 2500 [0.5 credit]
Climate Change: Social Science Perspectives
An introduction to climate change, with an emphasis on human dimensions. Topics include anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, regional variations in climate change and their consequences, human vulnerability and adaptation to environmental change, and climate change politics and policies at a variety of geographic scales. Also listed as ENST 2500.Prerequisite(s): GEOG 1020 or ENST 1020, or second-year standing. Lectures three hours a week.

GEOG 2600 [0.5 credit]
Geography Behind the Headlines
Exploration of the geographical backgrounds to selected issues of current public interest, through geography’s perspective of integrating human and physical environments. Issues selected will be structured from the global through the national/regional to the local, identifying the interdependencies among the scales. Lecture three hours a week.

GEOG 3021 [0.5 credit]
Geographies of Culture and Identity
Examination of culture, identity and place over time. Colonial and other historical processes that have shaped societies from place to place; relationships between cultural groups and their natural surroundings; gender, ethnicity, nationality and other dimensions of identity; impacts of globalization. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 2300 and third-year standing, or permission of the Department. Lecture three hours a week.

GEOG 3022 [0.5 credit]
Environmental and Natural Resources
Exploration of complexity, dynamics, uncertainty and equity issues underpinning environmental and resource issues; review and appraisal of selected contemporary methods to assess and manage environmental and natural resources. Also listed as ENST 3022. Prerequisite(s): third-year standing in Geography or Environmental Studies or permission of the Department. Lecture three hours a week.

GEOG 3023 [0.5 credit]
Cities in a Global World
Introduces the study of cities as “systems of cities”, the political economy of linkages between urban places located unevenly in space, and “cities as systems”. Case studies of socio-cultural, political and economic relations within biophysical and built environments. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 2200 or GEOG 2400, and third-year standing, or permission of the department.Lecture and discussion three hours a week.

GEOG 3024 [0.5 credit]
Understanding Globalization
Geographical analysis of processes of globalization: theoretical frameworks, historical context and contemporary challenges. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 2200 and third-year standing, or permission of the Department. Lecture three hours a week.

GERM** German Language Studies (All Courses)

GREK** Greek Language Studies (All Courses)

HEBR** Hebrew Language Studies (All Courses)

All HIST courses…Some Environmental related courses are below.

HIST 2310 [0.5 credit]
Canadian Environmental History to 1920
The shifting uses of nature in Canada from contact to the early 20th century. Topics may include pre- and post-contact aboriginal uses, colonization, resource industries, urban planning, tourism, and consumerism. (Field c or e).Precludes additional credit for HIST 2306 (no longer offered).
Lectures/groups three hours a week.

HIST 2311 [0.5 credit]
Canadian Environmental History from 1890

The history of interactions between humans and the natural world in Canada from the late 19th century: the influence of climate, topography, plants, animals and microorganisms on Canadian history, the impact of humans and their technology on the environment, and modern environmental movements. (Field c or e).Precludes additional credit for HIST 2306 (no longer offered).Lectures/groups three hours a week.

HUMR 3503 [0.5 credit]
Global Environmental Justice
Overview of critical debates on environmental issues from a global social justice perspective. Topics may include corporate mining, food sovereignty, poverty, economic exploitation, Indigenous cosmologies and environmental justice, militarization and environmental degradation, privatization of water and climate change. Prerequisite(s): third-year standing or permission of the Institute. Lectures three hours a week.

INDG ** Indigenous Studies (All Courses)

ITAL** Italian Language Studies (All Courses)

JAPA**Japanese Language Studies (All Courses)

LATN** Latin Language Studies (All Courses)

All LAWS courses-Environment related courses below:

LAWS 3800 [0.5 credit]
Law of Environmental Quality
Various aspects of environmental law; pollution control, legal actions and remedies; legal foundations for participation in decision-making processes. Social, economic and political forces influencing the formulation and implementation of environmental law. Alternative forms of regulation that may articulate different demands. Prerequisite(s): 1.0 credit from LAWS 2201LAWS 2202LAWS 2301LAWS 2302LAWS 2501LAWS 2502.Lectures three hours a week.

NSCI 1000 [0.5 credit]
Seminar in Science

Cross-disciplinary survey of current issues in science, providing new science students with an orientation to the study of science at the university level. Structured around seminars, oral and written presentations. Prerequisite(s): Restricted to students in the first year of B.Sc. programs or B.A. Biology programs. Lectures and tutorials three hours a week.

All PHIL courses…Environment related courses below:

PHIL 2301 [0.5 credit]
Introduction to the Philosophy of Science

Philosophical issues arising out of the attempt to understand the world scientifically. Topics may include: scientific methodology, revolution, observation, explanation, causation, induction, reduction, the difference between natural and social scientific understanding, realism, instrumentalism, constructivism. Prerequisite(s): a course in philosophy or second-year standing.

PHIL 3301 [0.5 credit]
Issues in the Philosophy of Science
Selected topic(s) in the philosophy of science or in the philosophy of a particular science (such as philosophy of mathematics, philosophy of physics, philosophy of biology, and philosophy of the social sciences).Prerequisite(s): PHIL 2301 or permission of the department. Lectures three hours a week.

PHIL 3380 [0.5 credit]
Environments, Technology and Values
Advanced treatment of ethical issues concerning technologies and environments, including: sustainable development, women and the environment, biological diversity, intrinsic or natural value or rights of non-humans, humans’ relation to the rest of the natural world, obligations to future generations, liberty versus equality. Precludes additional credit for PHIL 2804.
Prerequisite(s): PHIL 1804 or PHIL 2380 and third-year standing, or permission of the Department.
Lectures three hours a week.

PSCI courses (All Courses)

PORT** Portuguese Language Studies (All Courses)

RELI courses (All Courses)

SOCI courses (All Courses)

SPAN** Spanish Language Studies (All Courses)

TSES courses (All Courses)

WGST courses (All Courses)