Fall 2016 – Evening Lectures

The Fall 2016 Evening Lectures, with Dr. Eric Weichel, highlight a special topic each month.

To view a PDF version of Learning in Retirement’s Fall 2016 Evening Lectures brochure, please click here.

Japonisme: The Love of Japan in Impressionist and Symbolist Painting – Lecture FULL, Waitlist OPEN
Eleanor of Aquitaine and Medieval Royal Women – Lecture FULL, Waitlist OPEN
New Discoveries in Ancient Greek Visual Art and Archaeology – Lecture FULL, Waitlist OPEN
“Nourishment of the Soul and the Body”: Gardens, Food, and Visual Art at the Early Modern Villa – Lecture FULL, Waitlist OPEN    

Evening Lecture 1
Japonisme: The Love of Japan in Impressionist and Symbolist Painting – Lecture FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Eric Weichel

The “discovery” of Japanese visual culture among leading 19th-century cultural figures in Europe and America forever changed notions of art historical “quality” in the west: Japanese ceramics, prints, paintings, textiles, and folk ephemera were sources of major inspiration for western painters, leading to frequent acts of cross-cultural interaction. Explore the legacy of Japan among the Impressionist and Post-Impressionist painters of late 19th-century France, Belgium, and Scandinavia. Study Van Gogh and Gauguin’s appropriation of distinctively Japanese aesthetics, Cassatt’s interpretation of maternal themes found in ukiyo-e woodblock printing, Rinpa landscape screens and their appearance in portraiture by Renoir and Monet, and pieces from the popular ‘Japanomania in the North 1875–1918’ exhibition.

Lecture and visual presentation

  • Date: Friday, September 16th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants 

Evening Lecture 2
Eleanor of Aquitaine and Medieval Royal Women – Lecture FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Eric Weichel

Vivacious, cultured, and twice a queen, Eleanor of Aquitaine’s rebellious mind and powerful privilege allowed this extraordinary woman an unprecedented amount of political and social influence and visibility in thirteenth century Europe. How were medieval royal women written about and visually commemorated? Specific works of art under discussion will include the effigies of the early Plantagenet Kings at Fontevraud Abbey, ivories and  stained glass from the court of Louis VII, the splendid traditions of courtly love articulated at Poitiers and exported as far afield as Jerusalem, and the tradition of representing innovative and influential royal women, in the exquisite illuminated manuscripts of the period.

Lecture and visual presentation

  • Date: Friday, October 21st
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants 

Evening Lecture 3
New Discoveries in Ancient Greek Visual Art and Archaeology – Lecture FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Eric Weichel

A brief romp through some of the most exciting discoveries from recent archaeology in the classical nworld, especially at places where palace societies and intercultural activity within the space of the court are heavily stressed in the relevant literature. This includes Manfred Bietak’s discovery at Tell el-Dab’a (Avaris) of fresco fragments showing scenes of bull-leaping in New Kingdom Egypt, and the subsequent scholarly controversy over their dating, function, and meaning; jewelry from the multigenerational burials of elite women at the 8th-century BCE necropolis of Orthi Petra, Eleutherna (Crete); the recent dig at Amphipolis and the light it is expected to shed on the Alexandrine courts; and the transmission of Greco- Roman motifs in palace sculpture from Kushan Gandhara (modern Afghanistan).

Lecture and visual presentation

  • Date: Friday, November 18th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants 

Evening Lecture 4
“Nourishment of the Soul and the Body”: Gardens, Food, and Visual Art at the Early Modern Villa – Lecture FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Eric Weichel

For elite families in the Italian Renaissance, the country villa was a space for both private retreats and public entertainment, where rituals of consumption – banqueting, drinking, and court spectacle – became important tools of political interaction and social affiliation. Through a close examination of the Loggia di Psiche at the Villa Farnesina by Raphael’s collaborator mGiovanni da Udine, the Sala di Psiche at the Palazzo del Tè by Giulio Romano, and the Salotto of the Villa d’Este by Girolamo Muziano, explore the interconnected worlds of nourishment, pleasure, and politics at the Early Modern villa.

Lecture and visual presentation

  • Date: Friday, December 9th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants 

Lecturer Biography

EricWeichel - cropOver the past five years, Dr. Eric Weichel has taught several popular lecture series for the Learning in Retirement program. He holds a PhD in Art History from Queen’s University and is currently teaching at Nippising University in North Bay. He curated an exhibit on 18th-century French prints for the Carleton University Art Gallery and has presented at a wide range of international and national conferences.