Fall 2016 Session I (September 12 – October 26)

The Fall 2016 Session I will run over six weeks and will offer the following thirteen lecture series.

To view a PDF version of Learning in Retirement’s Fall 2016 Session I brochure, please click here.

International Issues in Human Rights
From Longhouse to Lumber to Legislation: An Anecdotal History of Ottawa – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN
Babylon to the Big Bang: The First Billion Miles – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN
Behind the Headlines: Current News and World Events – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN
The Brain and the Mind: The Neuropsychology of Being Human – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN
Walking Through Ottawa’s History: ‘Forgotten Stories’ From a Radical Tour Guide – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN
Keep It? Fix It? Sell It? Gift It? Toss It? Caring for Your Collections or Family Heirlooms
The Personal Journal: A Springboard for Memoir – Workshop FULL, Waitlist OPEN
Spy Fiction and Geopolitics
The Design of Western Landscapes from the Renaissance to the Present
The History of the Blues
“Infinite Follies and Nonsense”: Grotesques in Renaissance Italy
Russian Art and Literature: A Window to the Russian Soul – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecture Series 1
International Issues in Human Rights

Lecturer: James Hendry

Canadians are interested in human rights issues both at home and abroad. In this series, we will explore Canada’s various commitments to human rights within international law, how these commitments are made, the issues that arise from these commitments at home, what they mean to Canadians in their daily lives, and how Canada’s commitments are enforced. We will look at the way international human rights law has influenced Canada’s own law and the way South Africa has recently engaged with overcoming its past with a strong Bill of Rights. We’ll look at how the human rights record of some of Canada’s trading partners becomes our concern.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations

  • Days: Mondays, September 12th – October 24th (no class October 10th)
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

JamesHendryLecturer biography: James Hendry, BA (Carleton, 1976); LLB (University of Ottawa, 1979); Ontario Bar (1981), was in private practice until becoming counsel to the Canadian Human Rights Commission in 1984. He joined the Department of Justice in 1989 where he was General Counsel. He was a Research Director with the Canadian Human Rights Act Review Panel and a Visiting Scholar at Harvard Law School on a Canada-U.S. Fulbright Scholarship. He is Editor-in-Chief of the journal Charter and Human Rights Litigation and has published extensively on constitutional issues and lectured in Canada, Spain, South Africa, the United States, and Hong Kong. He taught Constitutional Law at the University of Ottawa. 

Lecture Series 2
From Longhouse to Lumber to Legislation: An Anecdotal History of Ottawa – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Phil Jenkins

A series of six lively lectures combining the anecdotal, biographical, administrative, and infrastructural to provide a chronological social history of Ottawa, from the arrival of the First Nations to the region, through the advent of the Europeans, to the present multi-cultural city. The story of Bytown/Ottawa will be examined by focusing on how each arriving ‘tribe’ (Algonquin, French, and British) made use of the geographical setting of Ottawa. Each lecture will be augmented by an extensive use of illustrations, photographs and a song or two, with all songs having some aspect of Ottawa history as their theme.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips, songs

  • Days: Mondays, September 12th – October 24th (no class October 10th)
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Phil Jenkins returned to Ottawa from Liverpool in 1978, with an honours degree in Environmental Sciences and a Middle Years Teaching Certificate. He is a writer and performing musician. He has written over eight hundred columns on Ottawa’s story in the Ottawa Citizen since 1991 and four national bestsellers – Fields of Vision, An Acre of Time (an Ottawa history), River Song, and Beneath My Feet – as well as three commissioned local histories: The Library Book, Off the Shelf and A Better Heart. He teaches and lectures in writing and Ottawa history.

Lecture Series 3
Babylon to the Big Bang: The First Billion Miles – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Peter Watson

Astronomy starts with the Babylonians, and in this lecture series, we will see why. Following their legacy, we will explore the Greeks as well as modern ideas of Copernicus, Galileo, and Newton. We will examine the vast variety of new ideas and techniques of the 20th century, and how these developments gave us a far more profound understanding of our solar system. The theme throughout will be our drive to understand how the universe works. Fall 2016 Session II lecture series entitled “Babylon to the Big Bang: The Rest of the Journey” will carry on where this one ends, although the two lecture series are freestanding.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips, possible evening at the observatory in October/November

  • Days: Tuesdays, September 13th – October 18th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Peter Watson infuriated his father by reading far too much science fiction as a kid. He learned physics and math at Edinburgh and Durham universities, and joined Carleton University in 1974, becoming chair of the Physics Department and then Dean of Science. He has worked at CERN in Switzerland, Oxford University and spent two years in Nigeria. In addition to a 40 year research career in theoretical physics, he has taught a wide variety of courses at all levels, many involving innovative teaching methods. Although he retired in June 2008, he continues to teach, give public lectures, and do research.

Lecture Series 4
Behind the Headlines: Current News and World Events – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Elliot Tepper

In this Global Affairs lecture series, we will discuss current events that are making the news. Hot topics of the week will be explored in depth, providing context and background for stories in the headlines. We will also be exploring some topics that did not make the headlines, but should have. The content will be determined weekly by emerging issues of importance to Canadians that affect our lives and our world. Come for lively discussion of the news that matters, led by a veteran Carleton University political scientist and media commentator. Perspective and analysis will be provided by the lecturer, followed by discussion with participants.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations

  • Days: Tuesdays, September 13th – October 18th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline – not applicable, as content will be determined weekly by current news

ElliotTepperLecturer biography: Dr. Tepper is a veteran professor of comparative politics and international relations at Carleton University. He regularly provides Media commentary at home and abroad on a wide range of topics, providing context and deep background to the news stories of the day. Balancing a career in academia and public policy, provides the basis for thoughtful analysis on current events. A lifetime of teaching on-campus and through the public media, provides the basis for an engaging, interactive classroom experience.

An internationally recognized scholar, Dr. Tepper provides analysis and policy advice to national and international organizations. He has published widely, headed national professional organizations, received many research awards, and serves on the Boards of Directors of a variety of professional and voluntary associations.

He is very active with the Ottawa diplomatic corps, academic seminar milieu, and with national and provincial political circles. Current academic titles include: Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs; Senior Research Fellow at NPSIA’s Centre for Security and Defence Studies; Research Fellow, Conference of Defence Associations Institute; Adjunct Research Professor at both Royal Roads University; and in his long time home, the Department of Political Science, Carleton University.

Listen to Dr. Tepper on Ottawa’s News Talk Radio 1310 with Mark Sutcliffe every Wednesday from 11:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. 

Lecture Series 5
The Brain and the Mind: The Neuropsychology of Being Human – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Peter Fried

The prefrontal cortex, the brain region that undergoes the greatest expansion both in evolution and individual maturation, controls the ‘essence’ of our humanity: planning, anticipation, flexibility in thinking processes, language expression, understanding jokes, social interactions, inhibitions, and our conscience. Topics will include neuroanatomy, progressive development and functioning as revealed in the behaviours of growing children and adolescents, risk taking, jazz, autism, and the impact of prenatal drugs.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations

  • Days: Wednesdays, September 14th – October 19th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

PeterFriedLecturer biography: Peter Fried is a Distinguished Research Professor and Professor Emeritus of Carleton University’s Psychology department. His teaching expands over more than three decades and includes introductory psychology, neuropsychology, perception and sensation, and physiological psychology. He has also taught in the Learning and Retirement program for several years. He is the director of an investigation, initiated in 1978, of the neurobehavioral consequences of marihuana use during pregnancy upon offspring. The findings are the most widely cited in marihuana-pregnancy scientific literature and have resulted in numerous awards and invitations to lecture around the world. He has worked with numerous international neuropsychologists and will couple this collaboration with his own research and teaching experience in this series of lectures.

Lecture Series 6
Walking Through Ottawa’s History: ‘Forgotten Stories’ From a Radical Tour Guide – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Brian McDougall

Comprising of two on-campus lectures and four walking tours through downtown Ottawa, this lecture series provides an unforgettable opportunity to learn about the lives of the people who built Ottawa but are usually ignored by official history: the Indigenous Peoples who resisted local land seizures, the Irish navvies who dug the Rideau Canal, the stonemasons who built the Parliament buildings, the women who occupied the House of Commons Gallery in the battle for abortion rights, the organizers of Canada’s first demonstration for gay and lesbian rights, and others. Stories are told in the places where the events occured.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, walking tours

  • Days: Wednesdays, September 14th – October 19th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (weeks 1 & 6) Walking tours of downtown Ottawa depart from the National Gallery of Canada or nearby the Château Laurier (weeks 2-5).
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 25 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Note: Participants will be required to climb stairs, walk, and stand for two hours during weeks 2 through 5. Additional parking costs in downtown Ottawa may apply.

Lecturer biography: Brian McDougall is a retired federal public servant, adjunct professor of Canadian Studies at Carleton, and life-long trade union and social activist. He draws upon his academic training (PhD in Sociology, and MA in Canadian Studies), his extensive experience in a wide variety of social movements (Indigenous rights, anti-war, anti-racism, pro-choice, gay rights, etc.), and his recent activity as the owner of a historical walking tour business in Ottawa (Peoples’ History Walking Tours). Often provocative, but never boring, Brian’s tours help residents and tourists to experience this city in novel and unforgettable ways.

Lecture Series 7
Keep It? Fix It? Sell It? Toss It? Caring for Your Collections or Family Heirlooms

Lecturer: Erica Claus

This lecture series will examine aspects of caring for objects in personal inventories: organizing, disposing, downsizing, assessing value, and collecting trends. Whether a collector, a casual acquirer, or the inheritor of family heirlooms, participants will learn to identify types of collectibles and art, and how to find more information on their pieces. They will learn how to train the eye to appreciate quality, value, and aesthetics. The series will provide information on the benefits of tax incentives for donating, export and import controls, and pitfalls to avoid in pricing or fakes. Criteria for making decisions about treasured objects and the latest options in documentation of art, antiquities, and collectibles will be reviewed. Participants will gain the ability to create inventories, to accurately describe objects, and take control of their own collections.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations

  • Days: Wednesdays, September 21st – October 12th (4 weeks)
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $100.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

EricaClausLecturer biography: Erica Claus is an accredited member of the International Society of Appraisers (2012), having completed rigorous training and examinations in appraisal methodology, standards, fine arts, antiques and residential contents. She also posses a graduate diploma in Conflict Resolution from Carleton University (2013). Experienced in the appraisal, care, and management of personal collections and family heirlooms, Ms. Claus has clients in government, public institutions (museums and galleries), insurance, the legal profession, as well as individuals. Prior to establishing her appraisal firm in 2012, Ms. Claus was Secretary to the Canadian Cultural Property Export Review Board and served as a diplomat for four years as head of the Cultural, Academic Relations and Public Affairs Section of the Embassy of Canada in Berlin. Her thirty-year career has been focused in the cultural, arts, and heritage sectors. Ms. Claus is trilingual and possesses a BA in museology, art history, and anthropology from the University of British Columbia, studied at the world-renowned Museum of Anthropology, and holds an MA in anthropology from Carleton University.

Lecture Series 8
The Personal Journal: A Springboard for Memoir – Workshop FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

Hemingway said, “In order to write about life, you must live it.” Whether we call ourselves writers or not, writing gives clarity to our lived experiences. This is a workshop for those who are interested in pausing, looking back, and honouring their lives through focused journal writing. While the goal of this writing workshop is to gather memories and stories, participants can expect to learn about writing as a craft and how it is we go from writing for ourselves to writing for others.

Workshop

  • Days: Wednesdays, September 21st – October 26th
  • Time: 10:00 p.m. – 12:30 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $195.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 15 participants
  • Lecture series outline

AnnaRuminLecturer biography: Anna Nikolayevna Rumin is a native Montrealer whose identity has been shaped by the political landscape of her home province, her Russian roots, and a passion for life-long learning that has been woven both formally in educational institutions, and informally through travel, voracious reading, the belief that each person has a unique story to tell, and a near obsession with the outdoors be it in the forest, on a lake or a mountain. Anna’s professional life has been rooted in education at all levels, in different parts of the world including Switzerland, Malta and Bhutan, and with all ages and nationalities. Regardless of who she is working with, Anna is committed to supporting those she leads in providing them with opportunities to set and meet their goals. Her guiding questions in both her professional and personal life are: “why am I doing what I am doing and how is that practice supported through research, experience, an ethic of caring, and wisdom?”

Lecture Series 9
Spy Fiction and Geopolitics

Lecturer: Dr. Michael Gnarowski

Imperial ambitions and geopolitical “jostling” made for fertile ground for terrorism and the clandestine. The art of fiction took this up and made it its own subject matter, producing, in what can be described as near modern times, some of the classics of spy fiction. Books to be read and discussed will be Joseph Conrad’s The Secret Agent, Erskine Childers’ The Riddle of the Sands, John Buchan’s The Thirty Nine Steps, and John Le Carre’s The Spy Who Came in From the Cold.

Lectures, discussions, assigned readings (note: all books covered in this lecture series are available for purchase at Carleton’s bookstore)

  • Days: Wednesdays, September 21st – October 26th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 40 participants
  • Lecture series outline (not applicable)

Lecturer biography: Dr. Michael Gnarowski is a Professor Emeritus in Carleton University’s English Department. His areas of particular interest include Canadian literature, modernist writing and Canadian poetry (19th century and modern). His work has been published widely by McGraw-Hill Ryerson, McClelland and Stewart, University of Toronto Press and Oxford University Press. Dr. Gnarowski has contributed to the Canadian Encyclopedia, McGraw-Hill Dictionary of World Biography and Oxford Companion to Twentieth Century Poetry among others. Formerly Director of Carleton University Press, he is presently Series Editor of Voyageur Canadian Classics with the Dundurn Group and General Editor of The Fiction of Hugh MacLennan with McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Lecture Series 10
The Design of Western Landscapes from the Renaissance to the Present

Lecturer: Paul Kariouk

This lecture series offers a brief introduction to the design history of the three primary Western landscape traditions, Italian, French, and English, which emerged alongside the Renaissance, Enlightenment, and the Industrial Revolution. We will examine the ways in which the design of extensive tracts of land in these three eras directly reflected the socio-cultural paradigms of their times. Each class will address historical examples along with contemporary landscapes that have evolved from those historic traditions and that are themselves reflections of current socio-cultural values. Lectures will rely upon material taken from the fields of art and landscape art, as well as from social theory, cultural geography, philosophy, and design history.

Lectures, visual presentations, film clips, assigned readings

  • Days: Thursdays, September 15th – October 20th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Paul Kariouk is a practicing architect and tenured professor in the Azreili School of Architecture and Urbanism at Carleton University. His professional work, which can be viewed at kariouk.com, has been recognized by design awards, such as the American Institute of Architects, and has been published internationally. His academic work focuses upon architectural design and history with an emphasis on historical and contemporary landscape design.

Lecture Series 11
The History of the Blues

Lecturer: Dr. Dave Schroeder

This lecture series will examine the history and evolution of the blues as an art form, from the precursors of the music through to influential present day artists. Sociological contexts as well as biographical accounts of relevant and historically significant artists will be explored. Musical examples will be played and discussed in relation to aesthetic, sonic, and cultural aspects of the pieces.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips

  • Days: Thursdays, September 15th – October 20th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

DaveSchroederLecturer biography: Dave has studied guitar with world-class teachers and players such as Steve Pittico, Wayne Eagles, and University of Miami Jazz Guitar Chair Randall Dollahon. He has also studied voice with Lauren Richardson. Dave has performed extensively in a wide range of genres, including rock, blues, jazz, reggae, hip-hop, celtic, funk, fusion, Afrobeat, country, and folk. His career has taken him to performances in Ontario, Quebec, Manitoba, Alberta, British Columbia, New York, Massachusetts, Alabama, and Florida. Dave has jammed with or opened for artists such as The Spirit of the West, Bruce Hornsby, April Wine, Junkhouse, The Headstones, Wu-Tang Clan, The Barstool Prophets, The Skydiggers, Etta James, John Lee Hooker Junior, and Kim Mitchell, among many others. Dave has also had the opportunity to jam and/or perform with major figures in jazz-related music such as Steve Bailey, Victor Wooten, William Parker, Jeff Hirshfield, Stefon Harris, Terrion Gully, and Brazilian guitar legend Nelson Faria.

Dave recently spent time in the studio with Ottawa guitarist Wayne Eagles and Boston area drummer Lee Fish, where the trio laid down some jazz fusion material now in the mastering stage. In December 2015, The Beeched Wailers released their debut CD “The Johnson Lake Sessions.” The album is receiving air play across the country and has made the top 10 in jazz in Canada. The group performs and hosts a jazz jam every Tuesday at the Wellington Eatery in Ottawa. Dave is currently an Adjunct Professor at Carleton University in Ottawa, where he teaches jazz, blues and classical music history, as well as theory and bass performance.

Lecture Series 12
“Infinite Follies and Nonsense”: Grotesques in Renaissance Italy

Lecturer: Dr. Susanne McColeman

Today, the term “grotesque” is used to describe something ugly, deformed, or abject. In the Renaissance, however, it referred to a specific all’antica style of ornamentation that was generally quite beautiful, a style that was full of hybrid creatures, morphing forms, playful children, bizarre masks, and images of things that defied the laws of nature. This lecture series explores the development of grotesques over the course of the Renaissance, the divergent interpretations of these images by sixteenth-century writers, and the rhetorical importance of the style for patrons.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations

  • Days: Fridays, September 16th – October 21st
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

SusanneMcColemanLecturer biography: Susanne McColeman received her Ph.D. in Art History from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario in January, 2016, where her research was supported by an Ontario Graduate Scholarship, the Bader Fellowship in Art History and the Joseph-Armand Bombardier CGS Doctoral Scholarship from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. Her dissertation, “Vasari, the Medici, and the Grotesques of the Palazzo Vecchio,” addresses how, and to what ends, the playful all’antica mode of ornamental painting known as “grotesques” was employed in Florence’s ducal palace during the Medici family’s sixteenth-century renovation of the building, a study that she is currently revising for publication. In addition to grotesques and the discourse of ornament in the Italian Renaissance, her research interests include the history and design of Renaissance gardens and Early Modern printmaking. Susanne also holds an M.A. and B.A. in Art History from Carleton University.

Lecture Series 13
Russian Art and Literature: A Window to the Russian Soul – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Oksana Drozdova

Russia’s creative genius is expressed through its vibrant culture. Great poets, novelists, artists, and architects have long voiced the conscience and soul of the Russian people. Russian culture has a rich history and tradition, most notably in the fields of literature, poetry, classical music, ballet, architecture, painting, cinema, and animation. This lecture series will introduce you to various aspects of Russia’s cultural heritage through a variety of means, including poetry readings, artistic commentary, and film viewing.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips, historical artifacts

  • Days: Fridays, September 16th – October 21st
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

OksanaDrozdovaLecturer biography: Oksana Drozdova is an Ottawa-based researcher and consultant. She studied history and art history at Magnitogorsk State University, in Russia, where she wrote a senior thesis on the artistic representations of Catherine the Great. After completing her undergraduate studies, Ms. Drozdova obtained an MA in history at the University of Ottawa. Her graduate research was centred on Turkey’s relationship with the European Union. She is currently pursuing a graduate degree in public and international affairs. Her research interests focus on international security, Eastern European studies, and issues of statehood in political theory.