Fall 2016 Session II (October 31 – December 9)

The Fall 2016 Session II will run over six weeks and will offer the following fourteen lecture series.

To view a PDF version of Learning in Retirement’s Fall 2016 Session II brochure, please click here.

Fifteen Fascinating Muslims – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN
I Ain’t Marching Anymore: Songs of War and Peace – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN
Babylon to the Big Bang: The Rest of the Journey – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN
Art Appreciation: Renaissance to Romanticism (Daytime) – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN
Russia from 1905 to the Present – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN
Actively Listening to Music – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN
Great 20th Century Mystery and Suspense Fiction – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN
Inuit Inspiration: One Family, Three Generations – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN
France in the Era of Louis XIV – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN
Creative Writing: Examining and Experimenting – Workshop FULL, Waitlist OPEN
Stories From Our Lives – Workshop FULL, Waitlist OPEN
Art Appreciation: Renaissance to Romanticism (Evening) – Workshop FULL, Waitlist OPEN
Who Do You Think You Are? The Basics of Genealogy  – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN
The Ottoman Empire: From Expanding Power to the Sick Man of Europe – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN     

Lecture Series 1
Fifteen Fascinating Muslims – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: H. Masud Taj

From the madrasa-graduate establishing the scientific method to the inventor of algebra; from the geographer of the most accurate map in the pre-modern world to the theologian-poet whose travels exceeded Marco Polo, Magellan, or Columbus; from a million-word medical encyclopedia to Enlightenment’s bestselling Arabic novel; from North America’s bestselling poet to Reagan’s favourite medieval economist; from the Shariah judge that inspired Europe’s most freethinking university to the scholar who, at the pinnacle of his fame, walked away from it all: we will examine their influence in their time and ours. Back by popular demand, this lecture series will visit the brighter side of the medieval Dark Ages: the golden age of Islam, to make sense of the present.

Lectures, visual presentations, film clips

  • Days: Mondays, October 31st – December 5th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 40 participants
  • Lecture series outline

HMasudTaj1Lecturer biography: H. Masud Taj, award winning Adjunct Professor at Carleton University and Visiting Fellow at Aligarh Muslim University in India, was mentored by the leading exponent of Islamic Architecture, Hassan Fathy in Egypt. He delivered keynote at the InternationalConference of Islamic Art and Architecture. Engaging the Other(Macmillan) features a chapter on his research and photography in Andalucia, Spain that was showcased by the Faculty of Public Affairs in 2015 and at Author Meets Readers event at the Ottawa International Writers Festival 2016. His book Embassy of Liminal Spaces is archived in University’s Special Collections and in the Library of Parliament.  

Lecture Series 2
I Ain’t Marching Anymore: Songs of War and Peace – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Stephen Richer

The aim of the lecture series is to examine some key songs and singer/song-writers associated with the major wars of the past 250 years or so: the American Revolution, the American Civil War, WWI, WWII, and the Vietnam War. Among the musicians to be discussed are Pete Seeger, Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Phil Ochs, Eric Bogle, Neil Young, and Arlo Guthrie. Our focus will be on how the biographies of such key personalities interact with social context to produce songs related to war and peace.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips, optional collective singing

  • Days: Mondays, October 31st – December 5th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Note: Books and DVDs related to this lecture series will be held on reserve at the MacOdrum Library on campus.

Lecturer biography: Dr. Stephen Richer is a retired Professor Emeritus of Sociology and former Chair of the Sociology and Anthropology Department at Carleton University. He has published seven books and many articles, mostly on education and Canadian society. After retirement, he took on several projects, including Education Director on an around-the-world cruise, teaching social research to Cree people on James Bay, leading sing-alongs for Alzheimer’s patients, and producing fundraising shows. He has been a folk/protest singer since he was eighteen and recently led protest singing against the CANSEC arms show and at rallies against the commercial development of Lansdowne Park.

Lecture Series 3
Babylon to the Big Bang: The Rest of the Journey – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Peter Watson

In this lecture series, we will step out beyond the solar system, understand stars and galaxies, and finally speculate about the origin and fate of the universe itself. The oldest written creation myth dates back to the Babyloinans. Our modern understanding, involving ideas as exotic as dark matter and dark energy, represent the same drive to understand how the universe works. This lecture series will carry on where the Fall 2016 Session I series entitled “Babylon to the Big Bang: The First Billion Miles,” left off. Although the two lecture series are freestanding, inevitably this second series will refer back to some of the material covered earlier.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips, possible evening at the observatory in October/November

  • Days: Tuesdays, November 1st – December 6th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Peter Watson infuriated his father by reading far too much science fiction as a kid. He learned physics and math at Edinburgh and Durham universities, and joined Carleton University in 1974, becoming chair of the Physics Department and then Dean of Science. He has worked at CERN in Switzerland, Oxford University and spent two years in Nigeria. In addition to a 40 year research career in theoretical physics, he has taught a wide variety of courses at all levels, many involving innovative teaching methods. Although he retired in June 2008, he continues to teach, give public lectures, and do research.

Lecture Series 4
Art Appreciation: Renaissance to Romanticism (Daytime) – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Angela Marcus

Original artworks in the permanent collection of European Art at the National Gallery of Canada will form the path for this tour and talk. It will begin with an early Renaissance mini altarpiece, and end with paintings of Romantic themes and style of the nineteenth century. We will see the art of several countries as this lecture series will encompass the Renaissance, Mannerist, Baroque, Rococo, Neo-Classical periods, and Realism. Iconography and subject matter will be far ranging as will the political context of the various periods. Analysis will be led by the lecturer and enhanced by class participation and discussion.

Lectures and discussions

  • Days: Tuesdays, November 1st – December 6th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: National Gallery of Canada
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included), National Gallery entrance fee not included
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Note: Please meet in the front lobby of the National Gallery of Canada

Lecturer biography: Angela Marcus (BA Hons/78, MA/93, Carleton University) has taught Art History/Appreciation for over two decades and has been teaching on the same subject within the Learning in Retirement program for several years. She is an independent researcher, art writer, and curator.

Lecture Series 5
Russia from 1905 to the Present – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Marcel Jesenský

The Russian Empire and the former Soviet Union represented an area larger than the entire North American continent. Modern Russia remains the largest country in the world, rich in a great variety of natural resources and peoples. Russia has been a remarkable success story, yet one with its own weaknesses programmed into it. Russia remains too large, too close, and too strange to fit into any comfortable pigeonholes. This lecture series offers a history of modern Russia, an extraordinary nation, with detailed analyses of politics, society, and culture.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips

  • Days: Tuesdays, November 1st – December 6th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

MarcelJesenskyLecturer biography: Dr. Marcel Jesenský is a specialist on the United Nations, international relations, diplomacy and European history. He holds a Ph.D. in History (University of Ottawa), a Master’s degree in European and Russian Studies (Carleton), and a Master’s degree in Civil Engineering (TU Košice). He completed post-graduate studies in international relations and law (Comenius University Bratislava) and worked at the UN. His latest book “The Slovak-Polish border, 1918-1947” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014) chronicles the legacy of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. He is teaching at the University of Ottawa and at Carleton University, and his current research focuses on the United Nations under Kofi Annan (1997-2006).

Lecture Series 6
Actively Listening to Music – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Keith McCuaig

This lecture series will help to fine-tune your ears and develop strong listening abilities. Learn about musical forms like the 12-bar blues and 32-bar chorus form, and how to identify individual instruments through sound. A wide variety of genres will be covered, including rock, pop, blues, country, R&B, reggae, and more. The ultimate goal of this series is to increase your enjoyment of music through a greater understanding of what you are hearing. Our analyses will not be overly technical and no musical background is required; all you need is a love of music.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips

  • Days: Wednesdays, November 2nd – December 7th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

KeithMcCuaigLecturer biography: With an M.A. in Music and Culture, and more than twenty years of experience as a musician, Keith McCuaig is a specialist in all things music and art. He loves exploring the histories of popular music, especially the interconnectedness of genres, and looking at the socio-cultural significance of music. Keith has extensive experience in researching, writing, and teaching a variety of musicological topics; he’s delivered guest lectures at two universities, presented at multiple international musicology conferences, and taught musicology courses through Carleton University and the University of Ottawa. From performing, writing, recording, and producing, to lecturing, giving music lessons, and working with community music programs such as Ottawa Bluesfest’s Blues in the Schools and Be in the Band, Keith’s life and passion is music.

Lecture Series 7
Great 20th Century Mystery and Suspense Fiction – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Stefani Nielson

Mystery and suspense stories have enthralled readers since ancient times. In this lecture series, we will investigate six modern classics of mystery fiction: Conan Doyle’s A Study in Scarlet, E.C. Bentley’s Trent’s Last Case, Raymond Chandler’s The Big Sleep, Eric Ambler’s Epitaph for a Spy, Ellis Peters’ One Corpse Too Many, and Peter Høeg’s Smilla’s Sense of Snow. We will review the origins of mystery fiction in the sensation and gothic novels. We will also discuss the core elements of the Golden Age’s “locked room” and country house mysteries, the American “hardboiled” mystery, the spy-as-detective story, the historical mystery, and the currently fashionable Scandinavian noir mystery.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips, assigned readings (note: all books covered in this lecture series are available for purchase at Carleton’s bookstore)

  • Days: Wednesdays, November 2nd – December 7th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Stefani Nielson studied undergraduate literature and publishing at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, B.C. After working with a cookbook and gardening publisher, she taught writing courses while completing an MA in American literature at Pennsylvania State University, researching for the Ernest Hemingway Collected Letters Project. After moving to Ottawa, Stefani completed an MA in modern philosophy and cultural issues. She has previously lectured on literature topics for Continuing Education at the University of Ottawa as well as with Learning in Retirement at Carleton University. Stefani also works as a freelance editor and enjoys films and gardening.

Lecture Series 8
Inuit Inspiration: One Family, Three Generations – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Jane Horner

This lecture series traces the art and lives of the extraordinary Cape Dorset family. Following an introductory class, we begin with the heroic life and art of Piseolak Ashoona (born 1904) followed by carvings and drawings by her five adult children and concluding with contemporary prints by her granddaughters, Shuvinai Ashoona and Annie Pootoogook. Each Ashoona descendant is a major artist whose works of art are exhibited nationally and internationally. Participants will be encouraged to display their own collections of Inuit art during week 5, while a field trip to the Canadian Museum Of History’s Inuit collection is planned for the last class.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips, visit to the Canadian Museum Of History’s Inuit collection (week 6)

  • Days: Thursdays, November 3rd – December 8th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included), Museum of History entrance fee not included
  • Enrollment capacity: 30 participants
  • Lecture series outline – updated

JaneHorner

*Note that this lecture series was originally advertised with the final week of the series being at the National Gallery of Canada.

Lecturer biography: Jane Horner obtained an MA in Art History with a focus on Indigenous art from Carleton in 2012. Her thesis was on the concepts of time in the art of Anishnaabe artist, Carl Beam. She previously gave an introductory lecture series on Indigenous art for Learning in Retirement and currently teaches in Almonte.

Lecture Series 9
France in the Era of Louis XIV – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Michael Dawson

September 1st, 2015 marked the 300th anniversary of the death of Louis XIV, the Sun King. Louis reigned from 1643 to 1715, one of the longest reigns in European history. Louis’ personal reign (from 1661) was famously characterized as the prototype of “absolute monarchy.” At its end, however, medieval legacies and the compromises of his reign and those of his predecessors still shaped the French state. The lectures will explore themes of royal governance, culture and life at Court, foreign policy and war, religious issues and revolt, as well as crime and punishment through carefully selected representative individuals and events.

Lectures, discussions, occasional visual presentations

  • Days: Thursdays, November 3rd – December 8th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

MichaelDawsonLecturer biography: Michael Dawson received his PhD. in Early Modern European History from the University of Toronto, specializing in seventeenth century France, in particular administrative and social issues. He has taught at the University of Toronto, Carleton University (Political Science Department), and at the graduate level at the Joseph Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. He is a retired Canadian Foreign Service Officer, with postings in New Delhi, India, Moscow, U.S.S.R., the Canadian Embassy in Washington and at NORAD Headquarters in Colorado Springs where he was Canadian Political Advisor to the Commander of NORAD and US Northern Command.

Lecture Series 10
Creative Writing: Examining and Experimenting – Workshop FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

“To think creatively we must be able to look afresh at what we normally take for granted” (George Kneller). This is an invitation to engage in a variety of techniques including free-writing, clustering, modeled writing, visualization, and reading like a writer, as a way of unblocking your ideas using them to create short vignettes, stories, poems, personal essays, and narratives. Please bring your own instruments and imagination to a safe environment where you can write, share your writing with others, and begin building a creative writing portfolio.

Workshop

  • Days: Thursdays, November 3rd – December 8th
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $195.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 15 participants
  • Lecture series outline

AnnaRuminLecturer biography: Anna Nikolayevna Rumin is a native Montrealer whose identity has been shaped by the political landscape of her home province, her Russian roots, and a passion for life-long learning that has been woven both formally in educational institutions, and informally through travel, voracious reading, the belief that each person has a unique story to tell, and a near obsession with the outdoors be it in the forest, on a lake or a mountain. Anna’s professional life has been rooted in education at all levels, in different parts of the world including Switzerland, Malta and Bhutan, and with all ages and nationalities. Regardless of who she is working with, Anna is committed to supporting those she leads in providing them with opportunities to set and meet their goals. Her guiding questions in both her professional and personal life are: “why am I doing what I am doing and how is that practice supported through research, experience, an ethic of caring, and wisdom?” Having moved to Ottawa in the fall of 2014, Anna continues to look for ways in which she can make a meaningful contribution to the community using the skills she has acquired in the journey that is her life.

Lecture Series 11
Stories From Our Lives – Workshop FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

“We write to taste life twice: once in the moment and once in retrospection” (Anaiis Nin). We all have a story to tell. Often we think of a life story or memoir as a chronology of events. However, knowing where to begin can become so overwhelming that we put off writing the story altogether. This is an invitation to re-collect, record, and share the stories from your life. Please bring your own writing instruments to a safe environment where you will experiment with writing strategies using prompts, share your writing with others, and begin your collection of life-stories.

Workshop

  • Days: Thursdays, November 3rd – December 8th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $195.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 15 participants
  • Lecture series outline

AnnaRuminLecturer biography: Anna Nikolayevna Rumin is a native Montrealer whose identity has been shaped by the political landscape of her home province, her Russian roots, and a passion for life-long learning that has been woven both formally in educational institutions, and informally through travel, voracious reading, the belief that each person has a unique story to tell, and a near obsession with the outdoors be it in the forest, on a lake or a mountain. Anna’s professional life has been rooted in education at all levels, in different parts of the world including Switzerland, Malta and Bhutan, and with all ages and nationalities. Regardless of who she is working with, Anna is committed to supporting those she leads in providing them with opportunities to set and meet their goals. Her guiding questions in both her professional and personal life are: “why am I doing what I am doing and how is that practice supported through research, experience, an ethic of caring, and wisdom?” Having moved to Ottawa in the fall of 2014, Anna continues to look for ways in which she can make a meaningful contribution to the community using the skills she has acquired in the journey that is her life.

Lecture Series 12
Art Appreciation: Renaissance to Romanticism (Evening) – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Angela Marcus

Original artworks in the permanent collection of European Art at the National Gallery of Canada will form the path for this tour and talk. It will begin with an early Renaissance mini altarpiece, and end with paintings of Romantic themes and style of the nineteenth century. We will see the art of several countries as this lecture series will encompass the Renaissance, Mannerist, Baroque, Rococo, Neo-Classical periods, and Realism. Iconography and subject matter will be far ranging as will the political context of the various periods. Analysis will be led by the lecturer and enhanced by class participation and discussion.

Lectures and discussions

  • Days: Thursdays, November 3rd – December 8th
  • Time: 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
  • Location: National Gallery of Canada
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Note: Please meet in the front lobby of the National Gallery of Canada

Lecturer biography: Angela Marcus (BA Hons/78, MA/93, Carleton University) has taught Art History/Appreciation for over two decades and has been teaching on the same subject within the Learning in Retirement program for several years. She is an independent researcher, art writer, and curator.

Lecture Series 13
Who Do You Think You Are? The Basics of Genealogy – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. John de Vries

This lecture series is intended for relatively inexperienced amateur genealogists, who want to engage in an interesting and challenging hobby. We will cover the basics of building your Ahnentafel (in simple English: your family tree) by exploring online sites and understanding the resources available in archives. Participants are encouraged to work on their family tree between classes, and to discuss their progress, or lack thereof, during class time.

Lectures and discussions

  • Days: Fridays, November 4th – December 9th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: John de Vries is Emeritus Professor (Sociology), Carleton University. During his working life, he taught mostly research methods, statistics and demography. In his spare time, he “commits” genealogy; during the summer, he often works in his yard, in mostly vain attempts to remove weeds.

Lecture Series 14
The Ottoman Empire: From Expanding Power to the Sick Man of Europe – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Oksana Drozdova

The Ottoman state rose to become a world empire that lasted for over five centuries. This lecture series will examine the early history of the Ottoman state, which emerged in Asia Minor during the breakdown of the empire of the Seljuk Turks. It will further explore the conquest of Constantinople by Mahmoud II and the rise of the empire to the pinnacle of its glory. The final session will wrap up the history of the Ottoman Empire from its decline until World War I, when the modern Turkish state, led by Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, emerged from the empire’s ashes. A discussion of the Turkish language and culture will be integrated into the various lectures of this series.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips, historical artifacts

  • Days: Fridays, November 4th – December 9th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

LOksanaDrozdovaecturer biography: Oksana Drozdova is an Ottawa-based researcher and consultant. She studied history and art history at Magnitogorsk State University, in Russia, where she wrote a senior thesis on the artistic representations of Catherine the Great. After completing her undergraduate studies, Ms. Drozdova obtained an MA in history at the University of Ottawa. Her graduate research was centred on Turkey’s relationship with the European Union. She is currently pursuing a graduate degree in public and international affairs. Her research interests focus on international security, Eastern European studies, and issues of statehood in political theory.