Late Spring 2017 Session (April 10 – June 2)

The Late Spring 2017 Session will run over six weeks and will offer the following twelve lecture series.

To view a PDF version of Learning in Retirement’s Late Spring 2017 Session brochure, please click here.

Fakes, Forgeries and Fame: The Art of Deception
Aboriginal Rights in Canada
From Longhouse to Lumber to Legislation: An Anecdotal History of Ottawa
Behind the Headlines: Current News and World Events – Lecture series FULL, waitlist open
Stories From Our Lives: Remembering Through Food
Remembering Through Reading: The Stories of My Life – Lecture series FULL, waitlist open
An Introduction to Reggae and Jamaican Music
Canadian Arctic Security in Context
Plato’s Republic
Digesting Notions of Healthy Eating in Canada
A Flourishing Art: Sculpture and Architecture in the Gardens and Woods of Italian Renaissance Villas
In Defense of Politics

Lecture Series 1
Fakes, Forgeries and Fame: The Art of Deception

Lecturer: Erica Claus

This lecture series explores the culture of copies and what lies behind fakes and forgeries in art. We will examine the art, law, science, history, market, and psychology of forgeries; the history of the copy; how fakes and forgeries are made and defined; the role of forensics; and how the connoisseur contributes to authentication. We will meet the stars and study controversies in the world of art fakes. We will examine the intentions of people behind them. Participants will be introduced to failed artists, thieves, entrepreneurs, people with complex psychological motivations, those with an axe to grind with the establishment, and even family members who have played a pivotal part in the history of fakes and forgeries.

Lectures, visual presentations, and hands-on learning

  • Days: Mondays, April 10th – May 29th (5 weeks)
  • Note: No class April 17th, May 8th or May 22nd
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Erica Claus is an Accredited Member of the International Society of Appraisers (2012), having completed EricaClausrigorous training and examinations in appraisal methodology, standards, fine arts, antiques and residential contents. She also possesses a Graduate Diploma in Conflict Resolution from Carleton University (2013). Experience in the appraisal, care and management of personal collections and family heirlooms, Ms. Claus provides appraisal and collections management services to government, public institutions, insurers, the legal profession and individuals. Institutional clients have included the Supreme Court of Canada, Public Works and the National Gallery of Canada among others. Prior to establishing her appraisal firm in 2012, Ms. Claus was Secretary to the Canadian Cultural Property Export Review Board and served as a Diplomat for four years as Head of the Cultural, Academic Relations and Public Affairs Section of the Embassy of Canada in Berlin. Her thirty year career in culture, the arts, international affairs and the heritage sectors has taken her to speaking engagements around the world. Ms. Claus is trilingual, with a B.A. in museology, art history and anthropology from the University of British Columbia, studying at the world renown Museum of Anthropology, and an M.A. in anthropology from Carleton University.

Lecture Series 2
Aboriginal Rights in Canada

Lecturer: James Hendry

Though the path to Reconciliation with Indigenous People will require much from politicians, they will need legal guidance in the way forward. Much of the history of the interaction of Indigenous People and Settlers was structured by Legal Proclamation, Treaties, theories about the origin of Settlers’ rights, and the federal Indian Act. However, modern legal ideas about the constitutional recognition of Aboriginal and Treaty Rights, modern treaties that create Aboriginal self-government, the adoption of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and advances in the recognition of Aboriginal title in their traditional lands may provide needed guidance.

Lectures, discussions, and visual presentations 

  • Days: Mondays, April 10th – May 29th (5 weeks)
  • Note: No class April 17th, May 8th or May 22nd
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

JamesHendryLecturer biography: James Hendry (BA,Carleton, (1976); LLB, U of O (1979); Ontario Bar (1981) was in private practice until becoming counsel to the Canadian Human Rights Commission in 1984. He joined the Department of Justice in 1989 where he was General Counsel. He was Research Director with the Canadian Human Rights Act Review Panel and a Visiting Scholar at Harvard Law School on a Canada-U.S. Fulbright Scholarship. He has published extensively on constitutional issues and lectured in Canada, Spain, South Africa, the United States and Hong Kong. He taught Constitutional Law at U of O.

Lecture Series 3
From Longhouse to Lumber to Legislation: An Anecdotal History of Ottawa

Lecturer: Phil Jenkins

A lively series of anecdotal lectures describing the growth of Ottawa, focusing on the way the beautiful natural setting for Ottawa, at the conjunction of three rivers and two waterfalls, has been developed. From earliest settlement around the Chaudiere Falls, to the building of the Rideau Canal, to transportation effects, to becoming the capital to the various plans for redesigning the city, culminating in the Greber Plan and its effect on the contemporary city.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips, and one song from Ottawa history per lecture 

  • Days: Tuesdays, April 18th – May 30th
  • Note: no class May 9th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Phil Jenkins grew up in Ottawa in the Fifties, and retuned to Ottawa in 1978 and commenced a career as a writer and musician. His particular passion for Ottawa history led tithe writing of An Acre of Time, which provides a history of Ottawa through the biography of one acre of land on Le Breton Flats. Since 1991 Phil has been a columnist for the Ottawa Citizen and had written several hundred columns that include Ottawa historical persons, places and events. He has also written several commissioned historie, including one on the Ottawa Public Library and the Heart Institute. He has lectured extensively on Ottawa history, including many times with Leaning in Retirement. He is a also a performing singer songwriter.

Lecture Series 4
Behind the Headlines: Current News and World Events – Lecture series FULL, waitlist open

Lecturer: Dr. Elliot Tepper

In this World Affairs lecture series, we will discuss current events that are making the news. Hot topics of the week will be explored in depth, providing context and background for stories in the headlines. We will also be exploring some topics that did not make the headlines, but should have. The content will be determined weekly by emerging issues of importance to Canadians that affect our lives and our world. Come for lively discussions of the news that matters, led by a veteran Carleton University political scientist and media commentator. Perspective and analysis will be provided by the lecturer, followed by discussion with participants.

Lectures and discussions

  • Days: Tuesdays, April 18th – May 30th
  • Note: No class May 9th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline – not applicable

ElliotTepperLecturer biography: Dr. Tepper is a veteran professor of comparative politics and international relations at Carleton University. He regularly provides Media commentary at home and abroad on a wide range of topics, providing context and deep background to the news stories of the day. Balancing a career in academia and public policy, provides the basis for thoughtful analysis on current events. A lifetime of teaching on-campus and through the public media, provides the basis for an engaging, interactive classroom experience.

An internationally recognized scholar, Dr. Tepper provides analysis and policy advice to national and international organizations. He has published widely, headed national professional organizations, received many research awards, and serves on the Boards of Directors of a variety of professional and voluntary associations.

He is very active with the Ottawa diplomatic corps, academic seminar milieu, and with national and provincial political circles. Current academic titles include: Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs; Senior Research Fellow at NPSIA’s Centre for Security and Defence Studies; Research Fellow, Conference of Defence Associations Institute; Adjunct Research Professor at both Royal Roads University; and in his long time home, the Department of Political Science, Carleton University.

Lecture Series 5
Stories From Our Lives: Remembering Through Food

Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

We all have a story to tell, and perhaps the single most important thing we can do, give, and leave for our families is our personal narrative. However, knowing where to begin can become so overwhelming that we put off writing the story at all. This is an invitation to re-collect, record, and share the stories from your life through memories of food and all things related to eating! What does the smell of chicken soup evoke? Or curry? Or apple-crisp baking in the late afternoon? Are there special glasses or cups and saucers you save for special occasions? Why? Where were your favourite places to eat? Please bring your own writing instruments to a safe environment where you will use food-related memories to begin writing your collection of life stories.

Workshop 

  • Days: Tuesdays, April 18th – May 30th
  • Note: no class May 9th
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $195.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 15 participants
  • Lecture series outline

annaruminLecturer biography: Dr. Anna Rumin is a native Montrealer whose identity has been in part shaped by the political landscape of her home province, her Russian roots, a passion for life-long learning that has been woven both formally in educational institutions and informally through travel, voracious reading, the belief that each person has a unique story to tell, and a near obsession with the outdoors be it in the forest, on a lake or a mountain. Regardless of who she is working with, Anna is committed to supporting those she leads in providing them with opportunities to set and meet their goals. Her guiding questions in both her professional and personal life are: “why am I doing what I am doing and how is that practice supported through research, experience an ethic of caring, and wisdom?” Having moved to Ottawa in the fall of 2014, Anna continues to look for ways in which she can make a meaningful contribution to the community using the skills she has acquired in the journey that is her life.

Lecture Series 6
Stories From Our Reading: The Stories of My Life – Lecture series FULL, waitlist open

Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

“Books are good company, in sad times and happy times, for books are people – people who have managed to stay alive by hiding between the covers of a book.” E.B. White. We all have a story to tell. Often we think of a life story or memoir as a chronology of events. However, knowing where to begin can become so overwhelming that we put off writing at all. This is an invitation to re-collect, record, and share the stories from your life through the lens of reading. What are the books, poems, songs, journals, plays and magazines that have played a role in your life? Please bring your own writing instruments to a safe environment where you will experiment with writing strategies using prompts, share your writing with others, and begin your collection of life-stories.

Workshop 

  • Days: Tuesdays, April 18th – May 30th
  • Note: no class May 9th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $195.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 15 participants
  • Lecture series outline

annaruminLecturer biography: Dr. Anna Rumin is a native Montrealer whose identity has been in part shaped by the political landscape of her home province, her Russian roots, a passion for life-long learning that has been woven both formally in educational institutions and informally through travel, voracious reading, the belief that each person has a unique story to tell, and a near obsession with the outdoors be it in the forest, on a lake or a mountain. Regardless of who she is working with, Anna is committed to supporting those she leads in providing them with opportunities to set and meet their goals. Her guiding questions in both her professional and personal life are: “why am I doing what I am doing and how is that practice supported through research, experience an ethic of caring, and wisdom?” Having moved to Ottawa in the fall of 2014, Anna continues to look for ways in which she can make a meaningful contribution to the community using the skills she has acquired in the journey that is her life.

Lecture Series 7
An Introduction to Reggae and Jamaican Music

Lecturer: Keith McCuaig

Reggae is a major part of Jamaican culture, and the impact and influence of this music continues to be felt all over the world. In this lecture series, we will look at the sonic and social history of Jamaican music, from ska, rocksteady, and reggae, to dub and dancehall. We will also discuss the rich and varied Jamaican Canadian music scene, including what makes it distinct, and the cultural biases against this music. Whether you’re a reggae aficionado, or your knowledge of reggae begins and ends with Bob Marley, these lectures are for you!

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Wednesdays, April 19th – May 31st (5 weeks)
  • Note: no class May 3rd and May 10th
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

KeithMcCuaigLecturer biography: With an M.A. in Music and Culture, and more than twenty years experience as a musician, Keith McCuaig is a specialist in all things music and art. He loves exploring the histories of popular music, especially the interconnectedness of genres, and looking at the socio-cultural significance of music. Keith has extensive experience in researching, writing and teaching a variety of musicological topics; he’s delivered guest lectures at two universities, presented at multiple international musicology conferences, and taught musicology courses through Carleton University and the University of Ottawa. From performing, writing, recording, and producing, to lecturing, giving music lessons, and working with community music programs such as Ottawa Bluesfest’s Blues in the Schools and Be in the Band, Keith’s life and passion is music.

Lecture Series 8
Canadian Arctic Security in Context

Lecturer: Dr. Andrea Charron

The Arctic, an ocean, is surrounded by eight states: Canada, the US, Russia, Norway and Denmark – the five littoral states – as well as Finland, Sweden and Iceland. The Arctic may offer a faster shipping route between Europe, Asia and North America and it may be the source of untold supplies of natural resources. Though disagreement abounds, the one area of convergence of opinion is that the Arctic is changing and changing rapidly. The annual temperature has risen significantly and what little infrastructure is present is susceptible to heaving as the permafrost melts. The general lack of adequate housing, employment, social and medical services means that northern residents are particularly susceptible to poverty and to diseases like diabetes and cataracts. The most immediate threats facing the Arctic, however, are not of the military sort. Rather, the Arctic’s greatest threat is that politics will trump informed debate. This lecture series unpacks and analyses issues associated with the Arctic as they relate to Canada.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips, and hands-on learning 

  • Days: Wednesdays, April 19th – May 31st
  • Note: no class May 10th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

andrea-charronLecturer biography: Dr. Andrea Charron holds a PhD from the Royal Military College of Canada (Department of War Studies). She obtained a Masters in International Relations from Webster University, Leiden, The Netherlands, a Master’s of Public Administration from Dalhousie University and a Bachelor of Science (Honours) from Queen’s University. Her research and teaching areas include NORAD, the Arctic, foreign and defence policy and sanctions. She serves on the DND’s Defence Advisory Board and has published in numerous peer-reviewed journals. Dr. Charron worked for various federal departments including the Privy Council Office in the Security and Intelligence Secretariat and Canada’s Revenue Agency. She is now Director of Carleton University’s Centre for Security, Intelligence and Defence Studies and Adjunct Professor at NPSIA.

Lecture Series
Plato’s Republic

Lecturer: Dr. Gregory MacIsaac

Join us on this intellectual journey as we read and discuss Plato’s Republic and grabble with questions such as: Why should I live a good life? Why not simply act in my own interest, at the expense of others? These are the questions tackled by the Republic, one of the earliest and most important works of philosophy in the West. In it, Socrates argues that acting justly makes your soul healthy and makes you happy, and that, conversely, the more unjust you are the more unhappy your life will be. Other areas to be explored include Glaucon’s social contract, justice in the city and in the soul, and the three waves.

Lectures and discussions 

  • Days: Thursdays, April 20th – June 1st
  • Note: no class May 11th
  • Time: 10:30 p.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: D. Gregory MacIsaac is Associate Professor of Humanities at Carleton University. He has taught in the Bachelor of Humanities program since 1998. He grew up in Antigonish, Nova Scotia, entering the Foundation Year Programme at the University of King’s College (Halifax) in 1988. He took his B.A. degree in 1992 from the Dalhousie Department of Classics, in Ancient Languages and Ancient and Medieval Philosophy, and his M.A. (1994) and Ph.D. (2001) at the Department of Philosophy, University of Notre Dame (Indiana). He spent the academic year 1994-95 visiting the Higher Institute of Philosophy at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium, studying Neoplatonism and Contemporary Continental Philosophy. In 2005-06 he was a Chercheur Étranger at the École Pratique des Hautes Études and C.N.R.S., Paris, and in 2011-12 he was a visiting research at the Plato Centre, Trinity College Dublin, and at the Institute of Classical Studies, University of London. In the Bachelor of Humanities, Professor MacIsaac’s main duty is HUMS 2000, the second-year Core-Humanities Seminar, Reason and Revelation. This is an intensive course on Ancient and Medieval Philosophy, covering authors from Plato to Dante. Professor MacIsaac has also taught HUMS 3205, Platonism and Idealism, and a number of fourth-year Research Seminars on topics such as Plato, Aristotle, Plotinus, Eriugena, Hegel, and Heidegger. Prof. MacIsaac currently teaches HUMS 1200, Humanities and Classical Civilization, the required first-year Humanities writing course.

Prof. MacIsaac is an award-winning teacher. At Carleton he has won the Provost’s Teaching Fellowship, Teaching With Technology Award, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Teaching Award and Teaching Achievement Award.

Lecture Series 10
Digesting Notions of Healthy Eating in Canada

Lecturer: Andrea Noriega

This lecture series will explore some of the challenges in defining what healthy eating should be. We will examine some of the prominent scholarly literature on healthy eating perceptions, as well as popular literature framing some of the diverging and competing ideas fueling public perceptions of healthy eating. Other sources of information, such as dietary advice (as framed by the food guide), food package labeling, as well as how the Internet is used to learn about healthy eating, will also be critically examined. The intention of this lecture series is to provoke thought and questions about naturalized and institutionalized assumptions of what healthy eating means.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips, and hands-on learning 

  • Days: Thursdays, April 20th – June 1st
  • Note: no class May 11th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Andrea Noriega is an Anthropology PhD student at Carleton who is preparing to conduct research on public perceptions of healthy eating in Canada. She has an MA in Applied Linguistics and Discourse studies from Carleton, and her research focused on the overlap of concepts of health and concepts of beauty in the way consumer products are advertised. In both degrees, Andrea’s research is situated within the medical anthropology, and investigates consumer culture as it pertains to discursive constructions of health. Andrea is also a Carleton University employee, and has participated in education and pedagogical research projects for the Educational Development Centre. Currently, Andrea is working on developing a course for instructors on classroom teaching technologies.

Lecture Series 11
A Flourishing Art: Sculpture and Architecture in the Gardens and Woods of Italian Renaissance Villas

Lecturer: Dr. Susanne McColeman

In the sixteenth century, the villas of Italy’s political and ecclesiastical elite often included large areas of land dedicated to formal gardens and woods. Adding to the natural beauty of these spaces, artists were hired to ornament the gardens with spectacular and sometimes bizarre artworks, such as a grotto carved into the shape of a screaming head, which one could enter through its gaping mouth, and a bearded giant dripping with stalactites crouched in the side of an artificial hill. In this lecture series, we will explore the art of six of the most extraordinary Renaissance gardens in central Italy.

Lectures, discussions, and visual presentations

  • Days: Fridays, April 21st – June 2nd
  • Note: no class May 12th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

susannemccolemanLecturer biography: Susanne McColeman received her Ph.D. in Art History from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario in 2016, where her research was supported by an Ontario Graduate Scholarship, the Bader Fellowship in Art History and the Joseph-Armand Bombardier CGS Doctoral Scholarship from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. Her dissertation, “Vasari, the Medici, and the Grotesques of the Palazzo Vecchio,” addresses how, and to what ends, the playful all’antica mode of ornamental painting known as “grotesques” was employed in Florence’s ducal palace during the Medici family’s sixteenth-century renovation of the building, a study that she is currently revising for publication. In addition to grotesques and the discourse of ornament in the Italian Renaissance, her research interests also include the history and design of Renaissance gardens, the subjects of her M.A. thesis. Susanne completed both her M.A. and B.A. in Art History at Carleton University.

Lecture Series 12
In Defense of Politics

Lecturer: Dr. Colin Cordner

Wherever democracy has arisen, it has been preceded by a vibrant political life. Wherever politics has been practiced, it has been loved and scorned, pursued or suppressed. The purpose of this series will be to explore the nature of politics as an expression of human life, and as the foundation of democratic culture. We will examine the nature of healthy political life and engagement with the help of three very political philosophers from three very different times and places: Hannah Arendt (USA & Germany), Bernard Crick (United Kingdom), and Aristotle (classical Greece).

Lectures and film clips

  • Days: Fridays, April 21st – June 2nd
  • Note: no class May 12th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Colin Cordner is a Doctor of Political Science, who has written and taught on a range of topics, ranging from ancient civilizations, classical philosophy, and the history of political ideas, to the history of science, millenarian movements and political religions. He is currently working on the philosophies of Michael Polanyi and Plato and the place of passion and tradition in science and education.