Winter 2017 Session (January 9 – February 17)

The Winter 2017 Session will run over six weeks and will offer the following thirteen lecture series.

To view a PDF version of Learning in Retirement’s Winter 2017 Session brochure, please click here.

How Architects Live and Die
French Art of the 18th and 19th Centuries
My Life as a Museum: A Springboard for Memoir – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN
Poetry: The Open Mind – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN
Film Music: The Sounds of Hollywood – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN
World Heritage in Danger
Renaissance to Romanticism – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN
Israel/Palestine: Will It Ever End? – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN
The Idea of Science: Physical Science – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN
War and Memory in East Asia, 1931 – Present
Biological Warfare: Modern Medicine vs. Modern Disease – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN
Eight Contemporary Italian Writers
A Brief History of Jazz: Duke, Dizzy, Miles, Monk, Mingus and More – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecture Series 1
How Architects Live and Die

Lecturer: H. Masud Taj

For lovers of biographies: how thirteen architects (primarily from North America but also Europe, Turkey, and India) ‘think about their work, the innovations they come up with and who and what influenced them.’ Combining ‘academic insight, artistic creativity, and unique personal anecdote,’ the talks with wit and verve may not dispel our existential loneliness, but lives lived with irrepressible creativity may help us face our finitude with fortitude. Architects that come alive this winter: Jefferson, Stanford White, Julia Morgan, Wright, Nari Gandhi, Louis Kahn, Fazlur Khan, Sinan, Gaudi, Borromini, Scarpa, Corbusier, Eilleen Gray.

Lectures, visual presentations, film clips

  • Days: Mondays, January 9th – February 13th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.HMasudTaj1
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: H Masud Taj, car crash survivor and award winning adjunct professor at the Azrieli School of Architecture, divides his time between Canada and India, where he is a licensed architect. His projects include the Navy Memorial and the House of Last Days, commissioned by a dying client. He featured at International Festival of Authors, Toronto; his book on architect Nari Gandhi, apprentice to Frank Lloyd Wright, is archived in the Special Collection of Carleton University Library and his Embassy of Liminal Spaces is installed in a Canadian Chancery and inducted into the Library of Parliament. 

Lecture Series 2
French Art of the 18th and 19th Centuries

Lecturer: Adriane Aboud

This lecture series will follow the evolution of art in France during the 18th and 19th centuries. During this 200 year period, the landscape of French art changed drastically in response to the political and cultural changes of the very turbulent times. The country’s art world expanded and contracted in response to these societal shifts, creating some of the most beautiful, thoughtful, and poignant artworks in western history. The series will be organized chronologically, beginning with the members of the French Academy and ending with the Impressionists.

Lectures and discussions

  • Days: Mondays, January 9th – February 13th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Adriane Aboud is an art history teacher at Heritage College. She received a Bachelor’s degree in History OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAand Art History from McGill University in Montreal, and a Master’s degree in Art History from the University of Nottingham in England. She lived in Europe for two years during which she travelled extensively. Upon her return to Canada she briefly took a job at the National Gallery of Canada before accepting her current post as a CEGEP teacher in Gatineau.

Lecture Series 3
My Life as a Museum: A Springboard for Memoir – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

We all have a story to tell and, very often, the things that surround us – the telephone bills, the drawer full of photographs, the stained carpet, the books on our shelves, forgotten stamp collections, old cutlery, our aunt’s moth-eaten teddy bear, your neighbour’s dog leash, a book collection, old recipes – the things we take for granted, are the very seeds of writing and curating your life stories using the stuff/things/artifacts that surround you. Whether you are a pat-rack or a neat-freak, My Life as a Museum will equip you with a safe space in which to begin writing these stories, with weekly prompts to encourage you to continue writing on your own between classes.

Workshop

  • Days: Mondays, January 9th – February 13th
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $195.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 18 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Dr. Anna Rumin began her professional career at Bishop’s University where she worked with annaruminundergraduates, graduates and classroom teachers in the School of Education. At the end of ten years, she and her family moved to Switzerland where she worked at the Lycee Jean Piaget. Upon her return to Canada, she joined Mindful Development Consultants and had the privilege of being part of the team who developed and designed the curriculum for a new Institute of Teacher Education in Eastern Bhutan. She is currently part-time faculty at Wilfrid Laurier University and works as a story-scribe in Ottawa and Montreal.

Lecture Series 4
Poetry: The Open Mind – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Mark Frutkin

The poet Muriel Rukeyeser once said: “Breathe-in experience, breathe-out poetry.” This interactive workshop will explore the question “What makes a poem tick?” We will look at examples of poetry from some of the world’s great authors from the classical to the contemporary, exploring a variety of poetic styles and genres. Participants will consider what skills to employ when writing poetry, do in-class poetry exercises, and have discussions about writing and publishing. We will also take a look at some of your own poems in a relaxed, open-minded, and supportive atmosphere. This workshop is open to any style of poetic writing.

Workshop

  • Days: Mondays, January 9th – February 13th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $195.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 15 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Mark Frutkin has long time experience teaching creative writing (both poetry and fiction) at the university level and for adults. He has taught at Carleton University and the University of Ottawa and conducted writing workshops at a number of universities in Canada. He has published fourteen books of fiction, nonfiction and poetry. His most recent collection of poems, Hermit Thrush (Quattro Books), is a finalist for the Ottawa Book Award. He also won the Trillium Book Award (best book in Ontario) in 2006 for his novel, Fabrizio’s Return. Over the years, he has written for the Globe and Mail, the Ottawa Citizen, as well as numerous other newspapers and magazines in Canada and the U.S. Mark Frutkin has a Bachelor of Arts from Loyola University of Chicago; he also studied creative writing with Allen Ginsberg and other American writers at Naropa Institute in Boulder, Colorado.

Lecture Series 5
Film Music: The Sounds of Hollywood – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Keith McCuaig

Music is a crucial component of virtually all Hollywood films. The sensation of suspense or joy or sadness that a film audience might feel is not only reflected in the music, but is often dictated by the music. This lecture series will cover the use of music in film, from the silent era to the present. Film techniques and their relation to the score or soundtrack will also be discussed, as will some of the most prominent Hollywood composers. Each class will feature plenty of examples from films.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips

  • Days: Tuesdays, January 10th – February 14th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: With an M.A. in Music and Culture, and twenty years experience as a musician, Keith McCuaig is a KeithMcCuaigspecialist in all things music and art. He loves exploring the histories of popular music, especially the interconnectedness of genres, and looking at the socio-cultural significance of music. Keith has extensive experience in researching, writing and teaching a variety of musicological topics; he’s delivered guest lectures at two universities, presented at multiple international musicology conferences, and taught musicology courses through Carleton University and the University of Ottawa. From performing, writing, recording, and producing, to lecturing, giving music lessons, and working with community music programs such as Ottawa Bluesfest’s Blues in the Schools and Be in the Band, Keith’s life and passion is music.

Lecture Series 6
World Heritage in Danger

Lecturer: David Walden

The World Heritage Convention is the most “universal” of all of UNESCO’s conventions, with 191 of the 195 Member States having ratified it. Currently, 1052 sites in 165 countries have been deemed to be of “outstanding universal value.” Yet 55 sites are currently on the “World Heritage in Danger List” because of threats to the very reasons they were deemed to be of outstanding universal value. The “In Danger List“ has come to be seen as a “list of shame” to be avoided at all costs, despite the financial and technical assistance that results from inclusion on the “List”. This lecture series explores the politics of World Heritage designation, the major threats faced by Sites, efforts at mitigation, and ongoing challenges.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations

  • Days: Tuesdays, January 10th – February 14th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: David Walden holds a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in History and Political Science and a Master of Arts in DavidWaldenCanadian Studies, both from Carleton University. He has over 30 years’ experience working with UNESCO, culminating in his appointment as Secretary-General of the Canadian Commission for UNESCO in 1999. David’s extensive international involvement includes chairing the UNESCO Intergovernmental Committee for Promoting the Return of Cultural Property to its Countries of Origin or its Restitution in Case of Illicit Appropriation; the Executive Board and General Conference of UNESCO; the International Network on Cultural Policy; and the UN Economic Commission for Europe Meeting on Sustainable Development. A member of the Executive Management Committee of the Canada Council for the Arts from 1999 until his retirement in 2013, David now works as a consultant in international organizations and governance. Since 2013, he has been a lecturer in cultural affairs and cultural policy at Carleton University, the University of Ottawa, and Brock University. David also currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Perley Rideau Veterans’ Health Centre (Ottawa) where he is the Chair of the Stakeholder and Community Relations Committee.

Lecture Series 7
Renaissance to Romanticism – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Angela Marcus

Original artworks in the permanent collection of European Art at the National Gallery of Canada will form the path for this tour and talk. It will begin with an early Renaissance mini altarpiece, and end with paintings of Romantic themes and style of the nineteenth century. We will see the art of several countries, as this lecture series will encompass the Renaissance, Mannerist, Baroque, Rococo, Neo-Classical periods, and Realism. Iconography and subject matter will be far-ranging as will the political context of the various periods. Analysis will be led by the lecturer and enhanced by class participation and discussion.

Lectures and discussions

  • Days: Tuesdays, January 10th – February 21st (No class January 24th)
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: National Gallery of Canada
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included), National Gallery entrance fee not included
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Note: Please meet in the front lobby of the National Gallery of Canada.
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Angela Marcus (BA Hons/78, MA/93, Carleton University) has taught Art History/Appreciation for over two decades and has been teaching on the same subject within the Learning in Retirement program for several years. She is an independent researcher, art writer, and curator. 

Lecture Series 8
Israel/Palestine: Will It Ever End? – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Peter Larson

Over the last 70 years, the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians has cost thousands of lives and imposed misery on many innocent people. To most Canadians, the issue appears unsolvable. It is difficult to have a calm discussion about it, as emotions are high on all sides. This lecture series will examine the Jewish and Palestinian narratives and compare them to the historical record and current reality. We will also look at whether Canada’s current policies are likely to help bring about a resolution.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations

  • Days: Wednesdays, January 11th – February 15th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Peter Larson is the Chair of Canada Talks Israel Palestine, (CTIP) a Canadian human rights organization PeterLarsonfocussing on the Middle East. His professional career included periods at the Public Policy Forum, the Conference Board of Canada, Le Droit, and as a consultant to labour unions and federal government departments and agencies. For the last 10 years, he has taken a particular interest in human rights issues in the Middle East, visiting Israel, Iran, Jordan, Egypt and the occupied Palestinian territories of the West Bank and Gaza. He has also led many trips to Israel/Palestine for Canadians interested in gaining a deeper understanding of the complex Israel/Palestine issue. He is a frequent lecturer for church and labour groups, retiree associations and service clubs. His presentations are appreciated for being fact-based and balanced. He is also the principal author of a weekly series of articles on the Middle East to be found at www.CanadaTalksIsraelPalestine.ca. He was the founding Chair of the Middle East Study Group of the Canadian International Council (National Capital Region), and was also a board member of the National Council on Canada Arab Relations, and the first chair of its National Education Committee on Israel/Palestine. In 2012, he was awarded The Queens Diamond Jubilee Medal by the Governor General of Canada in recognition of his educational work on Canada Arab relations. Peter graduated in Economics from the University of Western Ontario in 1968. He holds a Ph.D. in Political Economy from Université de Grenoble, France. In addition to English, he speaks fluent French and passable Italian and Spanish.

Lecture Series 9
The Idea of Science: Physical Science – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Alan Mortimer

These lectures will trace our desire to understand and explain the physical world around us. We will discuss key moments when ideas crystallized, from the early Greece to the idea of a ‘God Particle’. We will also examine how we have viewed our place, or position, in the universe. The common thread throughout the series will be the way in which scientists, and in particular physical scientists, think about problems: from idea to elegance to language. The lectures will also address the question ‘Where do great ideas come from?’ We will examine topics such as the description of the solar system, the development of classical physics through 20th century physics, quantum mechanics, the Big Bang, the Higgs boson, and dark matter. This lecture series is intended for those with limited science background but, at the same time, will raise many questions and issues of interest to those with a deeper knowledge. This series contains material from the previous lecture series ‘Great Ideas in Science,’ focusing and expanding on the physical sciences, so that there is more time to discuss the ideas, the concepts, the language, and the importance of each idea.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations

  • Days: Wednesdays, January 11th – February 15th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Dr. Alan Mortimer graduated from Carleton University (MSc in Medical Physics) and Guy’s Hospital AlanMortimerMedical School, London, England (PhD in Medicine). He joined the research staff of The National Research Council of Canada in 1975 specializing in medical ultrasound. In 1986 he moved to the Canadian Space Agency and became Chief Scientist, Life and Microgravity Sciences in 1989, responsible for all life sciences and physical sciences research. Dr. Mortimer accepted the position of Director of the Centre for Biologics Research, Health Canada in 2002 and later the Centre for Vaccine Evaluation. Here he was responsible for all research in biologic therapies as well as the approval and testing of all vaccines provided to Canadians. He currently is a consultant providing strategic advice to several government departments. 

Lecture Series 10
War and Memory in East Asia: 1931 – Present

Lecturer: Dr. Brendan Wright

Throughout much of the 20th century, East Asia was engulfed in international and civil wars. The legacies of these wars remain contentious and unresolved. Looking at conflicts and episodes such as the Sino-Japanese War, the “comfort woman” incident, the Korean War, the Chinese Civil War, and the Vietnam War, this lecture series explains the historical origins of the so-called “history wars” in East Asia.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips

  • Days: Thursdays, January 12th – February 16th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Brendan Wright recently received his PhD in history from the University of British Columbia. His research focused on South Korean state massacres against civilians during the Korean War, and the subsequent politics of memory surrounding these incidents. In addition, Dr. Wright has researched or published on the Vietnam War, representations of history in museums, and the history of Truth and Reconciliation Commissions. Dr. Wright has extensive training in International Relations, particularly the Cold War in East Asia. He has also assisted in teaching a wide variety of courses, including Canadian History, American History, and Global History. His current research concerns US violence against civilians during the Korean War, and the production and silencing of this history in South Korea. 

Lecture Series 11
Biological Warfare: Modern Medicine vs. Modern Disease – Lecture Series FULL, Waitlist OPEN

Lecturer: Daniel Burnside

Modern medicine is making major strides in its fight against some of the worst deadly and debilitating diseases. In this lecture series, we will learn about the causes, symptoms, and outcomes of several prevalent diseases. More importantly, we will learn about the tools researchers are using to make breakthroughs to fight, and hopefully eradicate, those diseases, while highlighting research happening right here in Ottawa. Muscular dystrophy, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, Zika virus infection, and AIDS will be discussed.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips

  • Days: Thursdays, January 12th – February 16th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Daniel Burnside is a molecular geneticist with a broad range of research interests in the health and biological fields. His primary work involves identifying new genes that participate in the repair of our DNA which helps us understand predispositions to cancer and human responses to chemotherapeutic drugs. He has also studied interactions between viruses such as HIV and the ZIKA virus and their human hosts to get a better understanding of viral replication and disease onset. Another current project has pinpointed the specific mechanisms that antifungal drugs use to kill fungi which should help us improve their efficacy in the future. Daniel is currently in his fourth year of his PhD studies at Carleton University. He holds a B.Sc. in Integrated Science with a concentration in Health Science. Apart from his research, Daniel teaches second year Human Physiology and Health Microbiology. He aims to make his classes not only informative but entertaining and applicable to everyday life. He uses many modern examples to impart knowledge that can be translated directly from the classroom to the community.

Lecture Series 12
Eight Contemporary Italian Writers

Lecturer: Simona Storchi

Italian literature has a long and rich history. Many current writers are contributing their own approach to novel writing and are widely read all over the world. This lecture series will introduce eight contemporary novelists, representative of the Italian literary context and their unique style: Alessandro Baricco, Niccolò Ammaniti, Erri De Luca, Paolo Giordano, Margaret Mazzantini, Melania Mazzucco, Andrea Camilleri, and Stefano Benni. Background information about these writers will be provided, together with some extracts from their novels for reading and discussion (English translations with original Italian texts). As some novels have been turned into successful movies, watching video clips will foster understanding. The aim is to get a glimpse of these authors’ work in the Italian context and suggest new reading materials.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips

  • Days: Fridays, January 13th – February 17th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Simona Storchi has been instructor of Italian language at Carleton School of Linguistics and Language simona-storchiStudies since January 2016. She graduated from Bologna University in Foreign Modern Languages and Literatures and obtained her Master degree in Teaching Italian Language and Culture from Venice University, Italy. She spent three years in Reykjavik as “lettore”, teaching Italian language and culture at the University of Iceland; in Italy she has worked as teacher of English language and literature in high school and Italian to foreign students for many years. Her main field is language learning but she has also developed interest in contemporary literature, particularly Italian novels, from extensive readings and research about language use.

Lecture Series 13
A Brief History of Jazz: Duke, Dizzy, Miles, Monk, Mingus and More

Lecturer: Adrian Cho

This lecture series will demystify jazz by helping participants understand how jazz originated and evolved and how it was performed over the years. This will give participants the opportunity to appreciate jazz in its many forms. Key figures in the history of jazz, including Mile Davis, Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus, Gil Evans, Benny Goodman and many others, will be covered. The lecturer will breakdown jazz performances by providing live demonstrations with other professional jazz musicians.

Lectures, discussions, film clips

  • Days: Friday, January 13th – February 17th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Adrian Cho has been performing music for over forty years. He performs as a jazz bassist and as the AdrianChoartistic director of the Ottawa Jazz Orchestra, a unique, critically acclaimed symphonic jazz ensemble that has performed in a series of high entertaining and educational jazz concerts annually since 2005. As a presenter and teacher, his educational outreach efforts and teaching have earned rave reviews. Alex Hutchinson of the Ottawa Citizen labelled Adrian “a cool guide to hot jazz” while Doug Fischer, also of the Ottawa Citizen, referred to him as “a musical missionary.” John Kelman of All About Jazz wrote that “Cho’s intentions were clearly to educate as much as entertain, and he succeeded on both fronts.” Combining his experiences in arts and business, Adrian developed The Jazz Process, an execution-oriented framework for collaboration, innovation, and agility that can help teams in any domain improve their performance. His book, The Jazz Process: Collaboration, Innovation and Agility, published by Addison-Wesley in 2010, has been endorsed by a diverse collection of thought leaders. Reviewers have praised the book as “a huge payback for the time invested in reading it,” “a deep exploration of collaborative know-how,” “a concept of leadership and teamwork that’s well suited for the Google-age workplace” and “a top pick for any business collection!”