Course Offerings Spring/Summer 2017

Full Summer Courses  |  Early Summer Courses Late Summer Courses

Note:  Registration for non-NPSIA students will begin on Wednesday, April 05, 2017.  To register for a course, you will be required to email the MA Administrator, Tabbatha Malouin, at tabbatha.malouin@carleton.ca, and you will be added to the waitlist.  If there is space in the course as of Thursday, April 06, 2017, you will be sent an override for the course and you will be allowed to register. A time limit will be added to this override to ensure that students that would like to register for our courses are all given an opportunity.  If the course is full, your name will remain on the waitlist and you will be required to attend the first class, and at that time the instructor will let you know if extra students can be added.

Please note that NPSIA does not use the Registration Override system on Carleton Central, you can only request a space in our courses by sending an email directly to Tabbatha Malouin at tabbatha.malouin@carleton.ca, with the following information:

Full Name:
Student Number:
Program:

It is the student’s responsibility to ensure the course they are registering in with NPSIA will count towards their program.

*Permission from your home department does not guarantee registration in our courses.

Sessions:

  • Full Summer:    May 1, 2017 to August 16, 2017
  • Early Summer: May 1, 2017 to June 13, 2017
  • Late Summer:  July 4, 2017 to August 16, 2017

March 23, 2017
Carleton Central opens at 8:30 a.m. for registration for Carleton University degree students (graduate and undergraduate). Full summer timeticket information can be found here.

April 25, 2017
Deadline for fee payment or assignment of funding to ensure payment is processed to your account without incurring a late charge.

May 1, 2017
Full summer and early summer courses begin. Late Registration charges take effect at 12:00 a.m. (midnight)

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Full Summer Courses

INAF 5234/IPIS 5305 – Jeffrey Smith
National Security Policy and Law

The international legal and policy implications of identifying and responding to national security threats. Topics include: intelligence gathering; verification regimes; military and counter-terrorism operations; criminal prosecution; and, balancing human rights and security concerns. Also listed as IPIS 5305.

Tuesday 6:05-8:55 p.m.
Room: TBD
May 1 – August 16, 2017

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Early Summer Courses

INAF 5469S – Professor Lagasse
Special Topics in Intelligence and International Affairs: Military & Strategic Studies

This course will examine the foundations of strategic thought, as well as the guiding principles of warfare in various environments, including land, naval, air, and cyber. In addition, the course will examine nuclear war planning, the military applications of space, psychological operations, counterinsurgency efforts, and the concept of ‘hybrid war’.

Monday/Wednesday 6:05-8:55 p.m.
Room: 3112
May 1 – June 13, 2017

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INAF 5469X – Professors Kilberg/Bruce
Special Topics in Intelligence and International Affairs: Dimensions of Cybersecurity

Description to follow.

Monday/Wednesday 6:05-8:55 p.m.
Room: 3112
May 1 – June 13, 2017

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INAF 5469Y/IPIS 5320Y – Professor Adams
Special Topics in Intelligence and International Affairs: CA and the Cyber Challenge

Description to follow.

Tuesday/Thursday 6:05-8:55 p.m.
Room: 3220
May 1 – June 13, 2017

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INAF 5479 – Professor Charron
Selected Topics in International Organizations and Global Public Policy: Arctic: Issues of Governance and Security from Different Perspectives

The Arctic, an ocean, is surrounded by eight states: Canada, the US, Russia, Norway and Denmark – the five littoral states – as well as Finland, Sweden and Iceland. The Arctic may offer a faster shipping route between Europe, Asia and North America and it may be the source of untold supplies of natural resources. Disagreement abounds. The one area of convergence of opinion is that the Arctic is changing and changing rapidly presenting numerous challenges. The annual temperature over the past decade has risen significantly. There is more precipitation, but less snow cover, which exacerbates the effects of climate change. What little infrastructure is present is susceptible to heaving as the permafrost melts. The general lack of adequate housing, employment, social and medical services means that northern residents are particularly susceptible to poverty and to diseases like diabetes and cataracts. The most immediate threats facing the Arctic, however, are not of the military sort. Rather, the Arctic’s greatest threat is that politics will trump informed debate. This course unpacks and analyses issues associated with the Arctic as they relate to Canada using 4 guiding questions:

  • What are the “threats” and whom do they affect?;
  • What are the governance structures and issues and who best to govern?;
  • What are the security and defence Issues and what agencies need to be involved; and
  • What might the future hold for the Arctic especially given climate change?

Tuesday/Thursday 6:05-8:55 p.m.
Room: 3228
May 1 – June 13, 2017

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INAF 5800 – Gerald Wright
Asia Pacific Economic and Political Relations

The evolving pattern of economic and political relations in the Asia-Pacific region. Topics will include security issues; trade and investment; and development cooperation; institutional arrangements, including ASEAN, APEC, AFTA, and Canada’s role in the regional affairs.

Monday/Wednesday 6:05-8:55 p.m.
Room: 3224
May 1 – June 13, 2017

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Late Summer Courses

INAF 5409 – Professor Sadik
Selected Topics in International Affairs: Turkish Foreign Policy

This course aims to provide the students with an informed understanding of the key issues and regions for Turkey in light of the post-Cold-War developments through a comprehensive analysis of Turkish foreign policy and regional security challenges ranging from refugees to terrorism. Therefore, the evaluation of the developments in Turkish foreign policy beginning with 1990s up to the present-day at international system and regional levels of analysis is the priority of this course. To this end, the course will focus on Turkey’s post-Cold-War relations with its key allies and regions such as the United States, the European Union, the Balkans, the Middle East, Russia, and Eurasia. In addition, the course will present a ground for an informed debate on contemporary international crises around Turkey such as the Arab Spring, the rise of terrorism and radicalization, as well as the emerging regional rivalries between the USA and Russia.

Monday/Wednesday 6:05-8:55 p.m.
Room: 3220
July 4 – August 16, 2017

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