Carleton University has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Waseda University in Tokyo, Japan. The agreement between the two prominent capital city universities provides more international study opportunities for students and research opportunities for faculty at each university.

Carleton and Waseda are committed to global engagement through enhanced international mobility and research collaboration, as well as training programs for professionals like those at Carleton’s Global Academy.

“As a capital city university with aspirations to use our Ottawa location as a global gateway, Carleton is especially well positioned to deepen academic, research and professional partnerships in Japan,” said Peter Ricketts, Carleton’s provost and vice-president (Academic).  “We have approximately 250 students a year enrolled in Japanese language studies and dozens of faculty engaged in research with Japanese partners.”

There are about three dozen Carleton faculty members active in Japan. Among them are Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Prof. Jason Etele, who has spent time as a visiting researcher at Japan’s Kakuda Space Center and has published several papers on rocket-based combined cycle engines with Japanese colleagues. Art History Prof. Ming Tiampo specializes in post-1945 Japanese art and Thomas Garvey, director of Carleton’s School of Industrial Design has a long history of working with institutions and individuals in Japan.

Carleton Engineering Prof. David Lau’s research focuses on improving the resilience of structures such as buildings and bridges during earthquakes, which happen more frequently in Japan than almost any other country. He is currently a visiting professor at the Tokyo Institute of Technology’s Laboratory for Future Interdisciplinary Research of Science and Technology, where he is collaborating on an advanced seismic engineering and urban disaster prevention project.

“Waseda’s relationship with Carleton opens important opportunities for students, researchers and ideas to move dynamically between Canada and Japan as they contribute to both institution’s shared tradition of addressing global issues and developing leaders who can make a difference,” said Norimasa Morita, vice-president for International Affairs at Waseda University.

Waseda, a large, private research-oriented university, was established in 1882 during an era of significant modernization in Japan with a goal of improving access to education, which is similar to Carleton’s founding ethos.

There are other parallels between the two institutions: both are rooted in their national capitals, and both have a focus on public policy that produces political and business leaders.

Conversations between Japanese and Carleton officials come during a time of increased talk at the senior government level about the importance of deepening trade links between Canada and Japan and developing the untapped potential of the bilateral relationship.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Japanese Prime Minster Shinzō Abe have met twice, and Global Affairs Canada and Japan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs have committed to advance priority areas such as infrastructure, energy, science and technology cooperation; improving the business environment and promoting investment; and tourism and youth exchanges.

Read more about Connecting Canada and Japan: Carleton PartnershipsGrowing

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