Merlyna Lim, Canada Research Chair in Digital Media & Global Network Society, presented an invited plenary talk at the Mapping for Social Justice: Approaches with New Media and the Digital Humanities Symposium held at Yale University on March 3, 2017. Her talk, titled “#Scholartivism: Mapping the In/Visible Landscape of Cyber-Urban Activism”, explored on her un-orthodox methodological and analytical approaches, combining computational mapping, on/offline observation, and media analysis, in researching the complex relationship between social movements, digital media, and actions on the ground. Focusing specifically on the utilization of dataviz and artwork, Lim argued for the centrality of visualization/radical aesthetic “as method, analysis, and engagement” in research, not only to reveal complexities and invisibilities but also to grapple with multiple and diverse spatialities and temporalities of contemporary social movements.

A month prior to Yale engagement, Lim delivered an invited public lecture at Concordia University as part of the Digital Ethnography Workshop Series of the Global Emergent Media Lab in February 7, 2017. In her talk, “Feet on the Ground, Tweets All Around: Social Media & Contemporary Popular Protests”, Lim scrutinized the complex entanglement of cyber-urban spaces in the making and doing of contemporary social movements. Using empirical evidence from various sites globally, from Cairo to Kuala Lumpur, Lim proposed an analytical framework to deepen our understanding of the interplay between social media and contemporary popular protests.

Recently, Lim also just published a journal article and a book chapter based on her latest research, the Malaysian #Bersih Electoral reform movement (see links below to download).

Sweeping the Unclean: Social Media and the Bersih Electoral Reform Movement in Malaysia, Global Media Journal, 14:27.

Digital Media and Malaysia’s Electoral Reform Movement, in W. Berenschot,Schulte Nordholt & L. Bakker (eds.), Citizenship and Democratization in Southeast Asia, Leiden: Brill, 213–239. 

 

 

 

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