Profile: David Wood

Profile: David Wood

Person

David Wood - Associate Professor (Applied Linguistics & Discourse Studies)
TESL Coordinator

  • Degrees: BA (Prince Edward Island), MEd (Ottawa), PhD (Ottawa)
  • Phone: 613-520-2600 x 6684
  • Email: david_wood@carleton.ca
  • Office: 241 Paterson Hall

Biography

David Wood has worked in applied linguistics, teacher education, and teaching English as a second language (ESL) and English for academic purposes (EAP), in Canada and abroad. His ESL experience includes work in Greece and in community programs and universities in Canada and he has taught applied linguistics and teacher education at University of Victoria, University of Ottawa, Naruto University of Education (Japan), Algonquin College, Kyoto Sangyo University, and Carleton University. He has also been a consultant in curriculum and assessment for the government of Ontario and the federal government of Canada. He has published and presented extensively on language teaching and acquisition, spoken language, fluency, and formulaic language, and authored an EAP textbook and several volumes on formulaic language. His research interests include formulaic language and phraseology, speech fluency acquisition, and teacher education, and he coordinates the programs for Teaching of English as a Second Language (TESL) at Carleton University.

Research Interests

  • Formulaic language
  • Acquisition of speech fluency
  • Teacher education

Editor, Special Research Symposium Issue of CONTACT. Refereed Proceedings of TESL Ontario Research Symposium. With Hedy McGarrell, Brock University.

Winner, Capital Educators Award, 2009.

Nominee, Capital Educators Award 2013, 2014, Carleton Graduate Student Mentor Award 2013.

Acting Director, Centre for Initiatives in Education, Carleton University 2011-2012.

Books

Wood, D. (in progress). Fundamentals of formulaic language. London/New York: Bloomsbury.

Wood, D. (2010). Formulaic language and second language speech fluency: Background, evidence, and classroom applications. London/New York: Continuum.

Wood, D. (Ed.) (2010). Perspectives on formulaic language in acquisition and communication. London/New York: Continuum.

Wood, D. (1997). Making the grade: An interactive course in English for academic purposes. Toronto: Prentice Hall Canada Inc.

Papers Published

Wood, D. C., & Appel, R. (in press). Multiword constructions in first year university textbooks and in EAP textbooks. Journal of English for Academic Purposes.

Wood, D., & Namba, K. (2013). Focused instruction of formulaic language: Use and awareness in a Japanese university class. The Asian Conference on Language Learning Official Conference Proceedings 2013, pp. 203-212.

Wood, D., & Appel, R. (2013). Lexical bundles in first year university business and engineering textbooks: A resource for EAP. In H.M. McGarrell, & D. Wood, (Eds.). Special Research Symposium Issue of CONTACT. Refereed Proceedings of TESL Ontario Research Symposium, October 2012. Vol. 39, No. 2 (pp. 92-102).

Wood, D. (2012). Willingness to communicate and L2 fluency: Complexity and variety in a corpus of Japanese and Chinese ESL learner speech. In H.M. McGarrell, & R.Courchêne, (Eds.). Special Research Symposium Issue of CONTACT. Refereed Proceedings of TESL Ontario Research Symposium, October 2011. Vol. 38, No. 2 (pp. 23-39).

Wood, D. (2009). Preparing ESP learners for workplace placement. ELT Journal, 63 (4), 323-331.

Wood, D. (2009). Effects of focused instruction of formulaic sequences on fluent expression in second language narratives: A case study. Canadian Journal of Applied Linguistics, 12 (1), 39-57.

Wood, D. (2008). Mandarin Chinese speakers in a study abroad context: Does acquisition of formulaic sequences facilitate fluent speech in English? The East Asian Learner, 3 (2), 43-62.

Wood, D. (2008). (Review of the book Phraseology and culture in English. P. Skandera, Ed.). Applied Linguistics, 29 (1), 161-163.

Wood, D. (2007). Mastering the English formula: Fluency development of Japanese learners in a study abroad context. JALT Journal, 29 (2), 209-230.

Wood, D. (2007). Measuring the link between formulaic sequences and speech fluency: Implications for the language classroom. Contact, 33 (2, Special Research Forum Issue), 97 – 117.

Wood, D. (2006). (Review of the book Formulaic sequences: Acquisition, processing and use. N. Schmitt, Ed.). TESOL Quarterly, 40 (2), 457-460.

Wood, D. (2006). Uses and functions of formulaic sequences in second language speech: An exploration of the foundations of fluency. Canadian Modern Language Review, 63 (1), 13-33.

Wood, D. (2004). An empirical investigation into the facilitating role of automatized lexical phrases in second language fluency development. Journal of Language and Learning, 2 (1), 27-50.

Wood, D. (2002). Formulaic language in acquisition and production: Implications for teaching. TESL Canada Journal, 20 (1), 1-15.

Wood, D. (2002). Formulaic language in thought and word: Vygotskyan interpretations. Cahiers Linguistiques d’Óttawa, 30, 26-55.

Wood, D. (2001). In search of fluency: What is it and how can we teach it? Canadian Modern Language Review, 57 (4), 573-589.

Wood, D. (2000). Fluency in second language speech: What and how? In D. Brooks, J. Robbins, & R. long (Eds.). On JALT 99: Connecting research and the classroom: JALT conference proceedings (pp. 196-201)[CD_ROM]. Tokyo: The Japan Association for Language Teaching.

Papers Presented

Wood, D. (2013, April). Focused instruction of formulaic language: Use and awareness in a Japanese university class. Paper presented at Third Asian Conference on Language Learning, Osaka, Japan.

Wood, D., & Appel, R. (2012, November). Lexical bundles in first year university business and engineering textbooks: A resource for EAP. Paper presented at TESL Ontario Annual Conference Research Symposium. Toronto, Ontario.

Wood, D. (2011, November). L2 speech fluency: Effects of anxiety and willingness to communicate. Paper presented at TESL Ontario Annual Conference Research Symposium. Toronto, Ontario..

Wood, D. (2008, October). Focused instruction, lexical phrases, and fluency. Paper presented at Japan Association of Language Teachers (JALT) Conference/Pan-Asian Conference (PAC), Tokyo, Japan.

Wood, D. (2008, August). Lexical bundles in an EAP corpus. Paper presented at the congress of the International Association for Applied Linguistics (AILA). Essen, Germany.

Wood, D. (2007, April). Formulaic sequences as speech strategies: Fluency development by Chinese and Japanese L1 learners of English. Paper presented at SEAMEO Regional Language Centre (RELC) Seminar 2007.

Wood, D. (2006, November). Measuring the link between second language fluency and formulaic language; Implications for the classroom. TESL Ontario Annual Conference, Research Forum, Toronto. Invited speaker.

Wood, D. (2006, June). Functions of formulaic language in second language speech. Paper presented at American Association for Applied Linguistics (AAAL)/Canadian Association for Applied Linguistics (CAAL) Joint Annual Conference, Montreal, Quebec

Wood, D. (2006, February). New trends in second language acquisition research: Implications for language program delivery. Presentation at Canadian Language Council National Conference, Victoria, British Columbia.

Wood, D. (2005, May). Formulaic language and communicative language teaching. Plenary Address, TESL Kitchener Waterloo Annual Meeting. Renison College, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario.

Wood, D. (2005, May). Classroom implications of the link between speech fluency and formulaic language. Presentation at University of Waterloo Language Teaching Colloquium. Renison College, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario.

Wood, D. (2002, June). Helping Japanese EFL learners to develop spontaneous speech skills. Presentation at Shikoku English Language Education Forum, Matsuyama, Ehime, Japan.

Wood, D. (2000, April). Teaching fluency: The roles of input, automatization, and lexical phrases. Paper presented at SEAMEO Regional Language Centre (RELC) Seminar 2000.

Wood, D. (1999, October). Fluency in second language speech: What and how?. Paper presented at Japan Association of Language Teachers (JALT) Conference Connecting Research and the Classroom, Maebashi, Japan.