PhD student Rana Abughanna- headshotRana Abughannam began her PhD studies at Carleton University’s School of Architecture and Urbanism in 2017. She obtained her professional degree in Architectural Engineering from Birzeit University in 2012 and was granted her post-professional Master’s degree from the History and Theory Program at McGill University’s School of Architecture in 2013. Prior to joining Carleton, Rana taught at the Canadian University Dubai as a visiting lecturer at the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences and an adjunct lecturer at the School of Architecture and Interior Design.  She was also an instructor at the Department of Architecture at Birzeit University teaching courses including history of architecture, architectural representation, and architectural design. Her research interests revolve around architecture in relation to memory, meaning, and identity while focusing on the conflict condition.

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Nicolas Arellano Risopatron is an Architect from Universidad Catolica of Chile specialized in “Systems and Technologies” and certified in “Developing BIM Projects”. He was Adjunct Professor of “Building Techniques and Construction” at this university. His first years of professional experience were dedicated to researching the benefits of wood construction in the Timber Innovation Centre at the same university. He moved to Canada in 2015 and worked at NORR Limited where he learned how to write scripts that allowed him to automate several solutions to repetitive production problems using algorithms. He is currently a research team lead at the Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS). In addition, he teaches BIM Fundamentals at Algonquin College and is the director of research of the Digital Building National Capital Region (dbNCR), a group dedicated to build and facilitate connections among AECO professionals. He is currently studying his Ph.D. at Carleton University focusing on the digital model and its impact on architecture.

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Brynne Campbell, PhD candidate

Brynne Campbell is a PhD Candidate with the Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism, Carleton University. Her research focuses on the Canadian Architecture profession’s historical use and understanding of marketing, as discussed through professional journals and resources. She has presented papers on the topics of marketing in architecture and the image of the architect. She is the co-organizer of POP // CAN // CRIT, an annual, national architecture symposium that acts as a resource, educational tool, and opportunity to share experiences and ideas related to architecture within a Canadian context. As the Practice and Education Manager and RAIC Syllabus Registrar at the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada, Brynne supports the development of national programs, projects and education for the architecture profession.

Marketing Architecture in Canada. Architects and scholars have suggested that the architecture profession is confused about what they do and they have trouble communicating their role and value to society. Exploration of the many guises of the architect perpetuated by society, the architecture profession, and architects will be undertaken. The aim is to understand whether it is reasonable to compare architecture to other professions and/ or to other art forms. If not, how can we define the role of the architect and what should the public image of the architect be? Where does the architect lie in the dualities of professionalism vs. artistry and business vs. art? Moreover, should architecture be examined in terms of dualities, or can the profession still relate to the Vitruvian concept, an architect with a wide range of knowledge? Is the perceived role of the architect an influential factor in the architect’s current use of marketing? Research suggests that North American architects are wary of associating themselves with business, and that marketing is often discussed in a pejorative fashion. A disciplinary confusion and struggle with identifying architects’ (and architecture’s) value to society may be negatively affecting the profession’s relationship with marketing, and feeding its apparent disassociation with business. This dissertation employs a discourse analysis approach to the books, professional journals and documents written for and by architects, between 1955 – 2015, with the aim to see how the Canadian architecture profession’s relationship with business and marketing has evolved. In addition, research will explore the role of architecture schools in teaching business and marketing, which may be seen as topics relevant to modern architecture practice. Finally, the dissertation will explore historical and current definitions of marketing to see if alternate philosophies may be better aligned with the core beliefs and mandates of the architecture profession, as defined by the licensing and professional organizations. The profession is overdue for a critical and open dialogue on its use of marketing, including a deconstruction of the language used in printed text. The goal of this dissertation is to promote a deeper understanding of the Canadian architecture profession’s relationship with marketing—as a tool for communicating, as an organizational or firm philosophy, or a means to an end (business necessity to find clients).

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Emelie Desrochers-Turgeon, PhD student

Émélie Desrochers-Turgeon is a designer and researcher working at the intersections of architectural representation, spatial justice and landscape. She began her doctoral studies at the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism in 2017. Her doctoral research, founded by the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship, considers the entanglements of settler colonialism, architectural representation, and the relationship between buildings and grounds. She completed a bachelor’s degree in Environmental Design at Université du Québec à Montréal and a Master’s degree in Architecture at McGill University. She worked in diverse design firms specializing in industrial design, architecture, landscape architecture and exhibition design in Montreal and Berlin. Her previous archival research at the Polarbiblioteket and Arktisk Institut (Copenhagen), Historical Archives of Contemporary Arts (Venice), and Library and Archives Canada (Ottawa) probed at topics of trans-nationalistic representation, architectural exhibitions and colonial building practices. Her field work research combines drawing and text-based practices and tackles issues of reading, representing, and surveying places.

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Kristen Gagnon, PhD studentKristen Gagnon is a PhD candidate in architecture, with a research focus on popular architecture criticism in Canada. She is also the project manager for the SSHRC-funded New Paradigm / New Tools for Architectural Heritage in Canada internship training program, a published writer (Urban Planning and Civil Engineering (ATINER), Canadian Architect, Canadian Interiors, Building Magazine, Journal of the RAIC, ArchDaily.com, 150 Stories), and the architecture editor and columnist for Spacing magazine. She has participated on various committees and councils, including the Doors Open Ottawa Advisory Council, presented her research internationally, and is the founder and co-organized of the annual POP CAN CRIT symposium.

Abstract: The intention of this dissertation is to question who the critic is and how they establish their authority, in order to theorize the possible role and influence of the popular architecture critic. It will work to answer the research questions by examining the work of Ada Louise Huxtable as an ‘apex’ of popular criticism, interrogating the authority of the critic as ‘expert’ as defined by Frank Fischer, and analyzing the case study of ‘Mirvish+Gehry Toronto’ as an example of the current conditions in popular architecture criticism. It will answer the questions: Who is the critic and how is their authority and power established? Can the critic be an authority or expert, and if so, how has this been done historically? How has the social role and influence of the critic changed since height of Huxtable’s career? What are the contemporary academic theories relating to the role and authority of the critic? What is the value of the critic today, and can the critic still be effective in popular architecture criticism? And, how do the historical and academic understandings of the critic’s influence relate to the findings of the case study analysis?

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Jenan Ghazal graduated with a Masters of Design degree from the Académie des Beaux-Arts in Tripoli, in 2014 in Lebanon, with the first rank award for a thesis on “Disaster Management Center”. She holds a Masters of Architectural Studies (MAS) from Carleton University (2016). Her thesis is titled “Architecture and Violence: Between Representation and Exchange.” She is a doctoral student exploring the theme of violence and architecture since September 2016. Her research aims to foster a rethinking of the conventional approach to destruction in urban areas affected by violence.

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Katie Graham is a PhD student at the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. Her PhD research focuses on how different methods of virtual reality storytelling help to reveal the hidden layers of the architectural history of a building.  Katie also works at Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS), a research lab affiliated with the school of architecture whose focus is on how advanced digital technologies and hybrid forms of representation can reveal the invisible aspects of architecture. Katie is the team lead of the Digitally Assisted Storytelling projects that use CIMS’ digital assets such as panoramas, historic photographs, models, photogrammetry, and point cloud data to create digital storytelling of buildings through web, mobile, and virtual reality. Current projects include The VR Kiosk – five passive virtual reality stories of parliament hill, Building Canada’s Parliament – an unreleased web project that will release monthly stories of Parliament Hill and the rehabilitation project, and the Senate Virtual Tour – a web application that uses panoramas, photographs, and photogrammetry to teach of the Senate of Canada’s architectural home.

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Marco Ianni received his professional designation as a member of the Ontario Association of Architects in 2017 while working with Douglas Cardinal. He is enrolled in the PhD program in Architecture at Carleton University while working in the CIMS lab and teaching Revit at Algonquin College.

Marco graduated from Carleton University’s Architecture program in January 2012 with a Master of Architecture (M.Arch), where he published his master’s thesis, entitled “Uncanny Dynamism: Can Neuroscience Inform our Understanding of the Modern City?”. During his studies, he played for the Varsity Men’s Soccer team. His interests extend the confines of architecture. During his studies, he played for the Varsity Men’s Soccer team. He trains multiple times a week in various Eastern and Southern Asian systems under Sifu William Hearst of the Hearst Academy of Martial Arts.

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Maryam Mirsepassi is an OAA intern architect, landscape designer, project manager and a PhD Candidate in Architecture at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada. Maryam was born and grew up in Tehran, Iran. She received a Bachelor in Architecture from Tehran University, and a Master of Landscape Architecture from Shahid Beheshti University, both in Tehran, Iran. She began her PhD at Carleton University, and while pursuing PhD, she has been an instructor in the Architectural Technology Program at Algonquin College. She has also been involved at CIMS (Carleton Imersive Media Studio) as a reaseach assistant for the Building Information Model (BIM) for Rehabilitation of Parliament Hill’s West Block.  Maryam has been employed at the House of Commons, Parliament of Canada, as a Project Officer on Centre Block Rehabilitation Program since 2016. Maryam’s research areas include theories of imagination, Persian garden, Persian architecture and landscape, rehabilitation, specifically in the 16th century Iran.

Abstract: Persian gardens are amongst the eternal arts that even after years of existence, not only have kept their characteristics and functions, they still surprise and amaze their viewers. And really, what lies behind the immortal designs of Persian gardens which makes them everlasting? Over the past decades in Iran, gardens and parks have been built to resemble Persian gardens and their characteristics, but after careful examination, it can be realized that during the process of their design, not enough attention has been paid to the true meanings hidden behind the design. Specifically, the attempt has been to mimic and copy the motifs and the geometrical patterns of the gardens without considering the underlying conceptual and philosophical details. Studying the artworks created during Safavid dynasty in 16th century, known for being the flourishing time of art and architecture in Iran, can be helpful for today’s designs. The Safavid artworks are valuable as they were created with efforts by notable kings such as Shah Tahmasb and Shah Abbas I. Philosophy and mysticism were the bases of Safavid schools, and among those, mystical philosophy of Shahab al-Din Suhrawardi, a 12th century Persian philosopher. This dissertation is drawn based on studies on the philosophical meanings of Suhrawardi’s works as one of the main sources for the architectural designs of 16th century in Iran, as well as studies on the arts and architectures of the same period. The aim of this study is to illustrate how Persian philosophy manifested in arts and architectures and how it influenced the creation of such works.

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Ken Percy is a PhD Candidate of the PhD program in Architecture at Carleton University.  His research interests examine the tension between the fields of architectural representation and digital fabrication.  While developing his dissertation Ken has been working at the Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS) where he has been leading projects on digital documentation as well as establishing the new CNC fabrication lab at the school of architecture.  Highlights of his projects include digital documentation of the Kasbah of Taourirt in Morocco, photogrammetric recording of historic wall paintings in a church in the Peruvian Andes, and laser scanning and surveying the Parliament Buildings in Ottawa for rehabilitation.  Further, in collaboration with public works, Ken has been developing a protocol for digitally milling the new doors for the Senate after relocation to the Government Conference Centre on Rideau Street.  

Abstract: The development and widespread adoption of Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) technology has both challenged and animated the practice and study of architecture.  Developing in tandem with the hardware, Computer Aided Design (CAD) software has fundamentally challenged the field of architectural representation.  On the surface CAD software appears to produce digital versions of hand drawn plans, sections, and elevations but there are a number of key differences beyond the physical construction of the drawing tools.  There are technical aspects of the CAD drawing which allow the lines drawn to be assigned as tool paths in CNC software that directly control the direction and physical movement of CNC tools.  Related to this both physically and philosophically there is a representation of time in the layers of an architect’s traces that are lost in digital layers of CAD software but reemerge in the software that controls the tool paths.  For these reasons I hypothesize that digital tool paths made from digital drawing and modeling software represent a new mode of architectural representation.  While the new technologies displace established architectural mediums, certain historical precedents allow us to examine the nature of the changes that arise from the displacement and offer us insight into our present condition.  The first treatise of the 16th century French architect Philibert Delorme illustrates both personal and professional experience with the changing modes of design representation at a time of professional upheaval in Europe.  Beginning with Delorme, this study is divided into three parts.  First, a close reading and original translation of Book I of his treatise Nouvelles inventions pour bien bastir et a petit fraiz provides us with context for the study of new and emerging digital tools for representation in architecture.  Second, a theory is developed around the analogous connection that exists between the work of Delorme and contemporary CNC related tools of representation.  Finally, employing CNC machines and the new mode of representation I will develop a series of projects that demonstrate through juxtaposition the nature of the new mode of architectural representation.

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Jesse Rafeiro is a PhD candidate at the Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism, Carleton University. His research, “Fiction as Pedagogy: Toward a De-Anthropocentric Architectural Education,” investigates the role of fiction in architectural pedagogy within the context of the Anthropocene. Specifically, the research explores the intersection of emerging fields in posthumanist education studies and narratology of the non-human within the context of architectural education and representation. The research aims to promote critical approaches to non-human design and de-anthropocentric frameworks of thought within architecture. Jesse also has a research background in digital tools between Carleton Immersive Media Studio (Carleton),  Facility for Architectural Research in Media and Mediation (McGill) and Instituto Superior Técnico Lisboa (ULisboa) where he has collaborated in a range of research projects for visualization, heritage documentation and dissemination.

Fiction as Pedagogy: Toward a De-Anthropocentric Architectural Education: Highlighting the technological and anthropocentric predispositions of common environmental pedagogy in architecture, the dissertation addresses a gap in the ecological thinking of the discipline. Departing from recent discourses in non-human narratology and posthuman education studies, the research investigates the integration of literary fiction into architectural pedagogy to explore underacknowledged relationships between human and non-human in the context of the Anthropocene. Common rhetoric suggests that current building practices are a leading contributor to global climate change, highlighting the responsibility of 21st century architects to explore new approaches. University education can offer a substantial contribution in this endeavour by engaging future architects to explore practices of adaptation and transition not yet practiced within the AEC industry. To date, architecture schools across the globe address climate change by offering courses on building technology, material recycling and sustainable design studios that favour the technological approaches promoted by organizations such as LEED in the 1990s. These approaches, focusing solely on energy efficiency and emissions reduction have been increasingly criticized for prioritizing the functioning of building systems over occupant use and limiting the creative engagement of architecture in ecological issues. Research on environmental education across architecture schools in the United States and Europe has demonstrated that these technological approaches misconceive environmental issues as solely problems of function. As such, the cultural values and non-human relationships that foremost determine an ecological sensibility in architecture remain underacknowledged. Current approaches to education reinforce anthropocentric thinking in education by treating environmental issues as concerns for human technological ingenuity and by implicitly attributing value to the non-human as a resource for human production and survival rather than of intrinsic worth within the overall ecological milieu. The research will contribute to ongoing research in the humanities that challenges this inherited mode of Western thought by speculating on future cultures of the Anthropocene that de-center the human species and ways of life. Specifically, the dissertation will focus on non-­­human narrative and representation strategies with the intention of promoting critical approaches to design considerations for non-human species and de-anthropocentric frameworks of thought within architecture.

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Miquel Reina Ortiz is PhD Student in Architecture (2015-present) at the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism at Carleton University. His research concerns the relationship between different scales of intervention within the context of the historic city. He has been a Teaching Assistant (2015-present) in heritage conservation, site and building documentation, urbanism and design studio. He collaborates with the Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS) in the development of new digital workflows applied to heritage conservation. He participated in international field works (Ethiopia and Nepal) and co-authored articles on topics related with digital heritage documentation. He studied architecture at ETSABarcelona (UPC), where he graduated with honors in 2011. He holds a MsC in Restoration and Rehabilitation at ETSABarcelona (UPC). His professional experience in the architecture studio Ravetllat-Ribas Barcelona (2008-2015) focused on adaptive reuse.  As a licensed architect he designed public space projects, housing projects, interiors and competitions.

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Jorge Rivera Gutierrez is an Ontario Trillium Scholar, PhD Candidate and architect working both in the design-build and videography fields.  He began his doctoral studies in 2016 at the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism at Carleton University. In 2007, he graduated from the Architectural History and Theory master’s program at McGill. His Guadalajara-based office, Departamento de Arquitectura, has been primarily invested in developing a design-build practice in collaboration with local craftspeople. He has also ventured along his brothers in making short films, video documents and video installations. His first video installation debuted at the 2016 Venice Biennale of Architecture, within the Mexican pavilion.  Interested in the intersection of narrative, memory, time, and architecture. His research focuses in exploring the capacity of film to convey the experience of place, and in turn as means to inform architectural thought and imagination.

Research Abstract: Most human stories must take place somewhere, architecture is rarely absent in film. Architectural environments serve essential roles in the unfolding of emotions and the experience of place in cinema. Conversely, cinema unravels apparent the affective qualities of architecture. My dissertation is concerned with how filmmaking uses architectural atmospheres to frame a story and allow its characters to unfold fully in these emotional spaces, and is asking what is there to learn for architects from the portrayal of architecture as a stage for fiction. My research deploys film hermeneutics, atmosphere theory and phenomenology to propose that film is not only a visual medium but a conveyor of rich, haptic experiences, and as such it bears the capacity to speak to us about the poetic, emotional, and experiential richness of place and architectural atmospheres. To this end, I focus on two key elements to support this argument. First, a specific style of filmmaking: the school of slow cinema and the cinematic long-take, as a way of engaging our emotions into the spatial experiences that film can offer. Second, the house as a location, mainly as a place for grief and thus, emotional reconstitution. By bringing these two elements together, the thesis sheds light into the affective entanglement we form with our houses, and the capacity of cinema of enriching critical architectural discourse about the places we dwell in our every-day lives.

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Ryan Stec is a PhD Candidate in architecture, an artist, designer, educator and producer working in both research and production. Interested in the cross sections of technology, creativity and the built environment, his most recent work is focused on art interventions that redefine how we experience the city around us. His passion for developing cultural discourse through artistic production has guided his heavy involvement in the artist-run culture of Ottawa since 1998.

Abstract: This research is concerned with the temporary and informal aspects of the spaces of the city and the political potential for design intervention. Drawing on the theoretical work of Bruno Latour and Actor Network Theory it outlines the possibilities for an object-oriented politics for design, that is a theory of politics which includes objects into the realm of action. Sited in the Centretown neighbourhood of Ottawa, this research will combine a counter mapping of the informal boundaries of the city with the design of temporary material interventions exploring the potential action of objects or the making of public things. The concept of a public thing extends the ideas about a pragmatic public as described by John Dewey in The Public and its Problems, where the public can be made tangible and specific through the examination of issues. In this sense objects become public things when they become a node in a network of issues which specify a public.  These two elements will form the basis of a prototype called the Action Information System (AIS). An AIS will combine geospatial dimensions of data with temporal dimensions as a new representational tool for both mapping and politics, demonstrating the possibilities for participation in the city and politics by both human and non-human actors.

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Pallavi Swaranjali is a PhD Candidate at the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism, Carleton University, Canada. She has a Bachelors in Architecture and Masters in Industrial Design from India where she has professional experience as a licensed architect. Presently she is involved in research with the Carleton Immersive Media Studio, in teaching as contract instructor and in part time professional work with Ilg and Ilg Inc., Ottawa. Her research interests harbour around the intersection between architecture and storytelling, various modes of non-conventional architectural representation which combine the normative and the fantastical, and  how they transform architectural creation and experience. She was awarded the CCA(Canadian Centre for Architecture) Collection Research Award for Doctoral students in 2015 when she studied the archives of Villa Chimanbhai, Ahmedabad an unbuilt villa designed by Le Corbusier between 1951-53. Her architectural drawing ‘Walking the Architectural Dream’ was exhibited  at the Frascari Symposium iii  at Washington Alexandria Architecture Center in  April 2017.

Abstract: This research takes a theoretical, critical and historical look at the contronymic nature of architecture and the non-conventional modes of architectural representation in the works of Indian architect, Balkrishna Doshi (b.1927). Doshi worked with Le Corbusier in the newly independent, postcolonial India before taking a pioneering role in the creation of a modern Indian architecture. Doshi has studied intensively traditional and historical Indian buildings, along with 16-17th century Mughal Miniature Paintings, Vedic philosophy and epics like Mahabharat and Ramayana. The visual representation of his buildings derives from the miniature paintings, and his works of fiction which accompany three of his built projects derive from dreams, mythologies and epics like the Ramayana and Mahabharata. Doshi’s stories and his built give to his architecture a subjunctive character- architecture viewed not through a positivistic lens but through an imaginative, oneiric and fantastical one, opening a space for interaction. This space of interaction is ambiguous but not vague and in being so incorporates the role of the reader (users and other players in architectural creation) and the author (architect). His architecture has this elusive property of being not theirs, not his, neither this nor that. The spaces are alive -they evolve, grow and tell stories themselves long after the architect has left. This dissertation takes a historical, critical and theoretical look at Doshi’s architectural creation which epitomizes the craft of storytelling, offering the possibility of extending architectural thought beyond the theoretical and the practical, and to revive in it contemplation, participation, reverie and emotion.

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Cristina Ureche-Trifu, OAA is a practicing architect and Ph.D. student with a focus on construction and conservation.  After completing her architectural training in Romania, Cristina then obtained an M.A. in heritage conservation from Carleton University before starting her PhD studies. In addition to her research, she has also gained significant teaching experience, serving as Teaching Assistant for courses ranging from the basics of heritage conservation and conservation studio, to architectural history and urban planning.  She has co-organized a conservation charrette bringing together students from design, conservation and engineering with the industry, and has presented at a number of national and international conferences. In parallel to her academic career, Cristina has been actively involved in the profession, having worked on a large number of conservation projects in and around the Parliamentary Precinct in Ottawa. Combining her passion for practice with her academic career, her research interests range from craftsmanship and materials conservation to studying the intersection between construction and conservation and the way in which conservation principles and theories get transformed during the actual project implementation.

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Kristin Washco is a PhD Student at the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism, Carleton University. She received her Master’s in Architectural History + Theory from McGill University in 2019, and her professional degree in Architecture from Virginia Polytechnic Institute in 2012. Kristin is a Registered Architect in New York and spent seven years practicing in New York City before relocating to Canada. Her professional work with NOROOF Architects, DXA Studio and MADERA has won multiple awards, including the AIA Award of Excellence, and has been published in The New York Times, Dwell, and Architectural Digest, among others. As a designer, she believes whole heartedly in the value of beautiful and well-made objects and seeks spaces which engage the senses and support the poetic act of dwelling. Her research interests are centered around the synesthetic experience of architecture, methods of architectural representation, and the translation from page to built work.