“I chose to come to Carleton specifically for the B.A. Honours History and Theory of Architecture program. I was enticed by the unique opportunity to complete a degree that includes courses offered both by the Art History department and the School of Architecture. This multi-disciplinary approach has exposed me to a wide variety of views and approaches for analyzing the built environment, considering historical and critical aspects alike, and has left all doors open to me as I move forward. The opportunity to undertake independent research in my area of interest, through my Honours Research Essay, has allowed me to take responsibility for my own learning. The self-motivation and independence I have enjoyed as a fourth-year student have made me confident that I am prepared to continue my studies at the Masters level. And completing a practicum placement in the heritage field opened my eyes to the wide variety of professional opportunities available to someone with such a distinctive degree. My professors’ enthusiasm in seeing me succeed has been inspiring, and their availability for one-on-one consultation has made them not just professors but also trusted mentors.” (Hilary Grant, HTA 2012)

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“The B.A. Honours in History and Theory of Architecture provides a unique opportunity to combine courses in the humanities with courses from the School of Architecture. Being in the capital of Canada provides access to many national resources that give you hands on opportunities to study in your field. But the greatest thing about Carleton is not its location but its people. The Faculty are so welcoming and passionate in their fields; they have become an educational family to me. I have spent many hours in the St. Patrick’s building, and it never gets boring. I encourage anybody who is interested in pursuing a deeper knowledge of Architecture and Art, to be a part of Carleton’s unique opportunities.” (Jana Nitschke)

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“Upon my arrival at Carleton I was met with hungry students and passionate professors who ignited an eagerness for study in me that I had never experienced in high school. I thoroughly enjoy the regular field trips and appreciate that faculty give assignments which allow me to get outside the classrooms and study local, touchable architecture. My first year was an enlightening montage of challenging and rewarding courses that equipped me to read precisely, write proficiently, and analyze methodically. I leave every class with a feeling of gratification – the feeling that comes with learning something new, something relevant – that inspires me to dive deeper into my studies.

I would consider the faculty to be the most important feature of the HTA program. They are utterly devoted to their students and I have always felt welcome to meet with professors and TAs to talk about course material, assignments or just something interesting that I dug up during research. Their passion and determination inspired in me a tenacity to succeed, which is essential to achieving my goals. The skills I have learned have not only been fundamental to understanding the intricate world of architecture but also indispensable to my every day life.” (Tyler Helms)

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“In my tenure at Carleton in History and Theory of Architecture, I have found studying theory of architecture extremely beneficial and a wonderful complement to my growing understanding of buildings. With courses outside of my major, I have a greater perspective on architecture, design and the people architects design for. The program connected me to professors in the arts and architecture, and the extra tools from courses such as Psychology and Geography that help me to better understand the world of building design. In this program, I am free to pursue my goals freely which has given me more confidence, and made me more passionate about what I am studying.” (Daniel Stewart)

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“This past semester, I have done a Practicum with the Society for the Study of Architecture in Canada. My task was a rather big one – to go through years of archival material in order to develop an acute understanding of the formative years of the society, about which I would eventually write a paper. It was like opening a time capsule which no one had looked at before. All this information was there for me to discover – like an academic treasure hunt. For the first time in my academic career, I was on the other side of history. I was not reading a historical account of the society, I was writing my own.

I can’t imagine gaining this sort of experience anywhere else. In many ways, doing a practicum really made everything I have been studying for the past three years come together. And more than that, it allowed me a glimpse inside the professional world of archival work. While every practicum placement differs in responsibilities and tasks, it is a great way to put your future professional goals into perspective. (Leona Nikolic)