Course Listings for the Academic Year 2016-17

Please note: students are responsible for insuring that your selected courses meet the program requirements stated in the Calendar. If, however, you feel that you need additional information or guidance please contact us.

Fall Courses

CLMD 6101T: Perspectives on Interdisciplinarity in Cultural Theory 
Instructor: Barbara Leckie

This course will address the theory and practice of interdisciplinary studies of culture. Attention will be paid to those themes and issues in cultural theory of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries that inform contemporary interdisciplinary work in literature, film, music, art and new media. ‎This course is continued in the second semester. (Please note that this course is only open to students in the PhD in Cultural Mediations program).

CLMD 6102F/ARTH 5117F Decentering Globalism
Instructor: Ming Tiampo

This is an interdisciplinary course situated at the intersection of World Studies and Diaspora Studies. The course will provide an overview of recent theoretical discourses in both world studies and diaspora studies, and investigate how they can be productively put into conversation. The course will consider how we configure ideas of the global on three levels—as scale, as actor theory, and as method. We will investigate multiple intellectual models of theorizing the global and the diasporic, and also consider the limits of both in a number of disciplines in the humanities, but with a focus on art history.

CLMD 6103F/ EURR 5201F/ARCH 5000: Issues of Cultural Mediation and Representation:  Architecture and Memory in Europe
Instructor:  Jerzy Elżanowski

This course surveys monuments, memorials, and monumental urban ensembles in the former East Bloc, with a particular focus on Germany, Poland, Estonia, and Russia.  We will look at monuments, not only in their local urban or rural settings, but also as they relate to each other in the context of broader geopolitical pressures.  Over the course of a dozen seminars, we will examine monuments and the people who built and used them, asking difficult questions about the political and ideological promiscuity of commemorative landscapes.  Methodologically, this course investigates the complex relationships between social groups and their symbolic architectures at times of conflict.  By exploring early postwar cartography and photography, it considers the often-elided question of the presence and meaning of human remains in the sphere of urban profanum.

CLMD 6104F/ENGL5610F: Culture and Crisis: Poverty, Migration, Climate
Instructor:  Franny Nudelman

In this course, we will consider writers, photographers, and filmmakers who have responded to the urgent and interrelated contemporary crises of poverty, forced migration, and climate change. What role does literary and visual culture play in making disruptive change real, and helping us to comprehend conditions that are still in the process of unfolding? How do artists address the political and ethical dimensions of new social realities? The figures that we will study innovate in an effort to capture the extreme experiences of their subjects, as well as their own immersive creative practices. At the same time, they often question and subvert the very rhetoric of emergency that characterizes our mediascape as well as a great deal of scholarship on socially-engaged contemporary culture.

CLMD 6106F/ARTH 5112G/HIST 5906F/ENGL 5900X: Historical Representation and Historical Memory 
Instructor: Mark Salber Phillips

We tend to think of history as the special domain of historians, but in reality historical representation has a much wider compass, including biography, historical memory, fiction, and the visual arts. In your term papers, you will also be encouraged to extend this range still further where questions of historical representation enter into your wider interests.

Our starting point will be a recognition that all forms of historical thinking and description are deeply engaged with issues of mediation, memory, and distance. Drawing on a variety of theoretical discussions and close readings, we will explore a number of modes of historical representation as expressed in works on history, tradition, memory, the novel, art theory, and memoir. Special attention will also be given to problems of narrativity and distance as exemplified in the historical thought of the 18th and 19th centuries.

CLMD 6902F/ARTH 5112F/ANTH 5807A Multiple Modernisms: 20th Century Arts in Global Perspective
Instructor:  Ruth Phillips

This seminar explores the global engagements with artistic modernism pursued by artists outside the West during the twentieth century. Its comparative structure is intended to reveal both common patterns that inform world modernisms and unique features that reflect local experiences and negotiations of modernity.  By adopting a global framework we will expand the times and places of modernist artistic production and problematize art historical narratives which define it as an exclusively European invention of the first half of the twentieth century.  Readings will centre on the visual arts of colonized and Indigenous societies in North America, Africa, India and the Pacific.

CLMD 6900T: “Interdisciplinary Research Methods”
Instructor: Sarah Casteel

The primary goal of this year-long, workshop-based course for second-year doctoral students is to help students prepare for the second comprehensive examination and dissertation research. The class will offer students a supportive space in which to workshop their second comprehensive examination lists and their preliminary dissertation proposals. Students will work together to develop and exchange ideas about their teaching fields and dissertations with their peers and to benefit from constructive criticism. Be prepared to engage with other students’ scholarship fully and constructively as we discuss, develop and refine plans for future research.

The second major goal of the course is to foster practical skills and knowledge necessary for academic success at the doctoral level and beyond. The course will help students master various aspects of the academic profession including: writing OGS and SSHRC plans of study, becoming acquainted with library resources, academic publishing, conference paper presentations, research ethics and other professional concerns. Further topics will be introduced in response to student need. This course is continued in the second semester.  (Please note that this course is only open to students in the PhD in Cultural Mediations program).


Winter Courses

CLMD 6101T: Perspectives on Interdisciplinarity in Cultural Theory
Instructor: Daniel McNeil

This course is a continuation of CLMD 6101 in the first semester. This course will address the theory and practice of interdisciplinary studies of culture. Attention will be paid to those themes and issues in cultural theory of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries that inform contemporary interdisciplinary work in literature, film, music, art and new media. ‎(Please note that this course is only open to students in the PhD in Cultural Mediations program).

CLMD 6102/ENGL 5004: “Holocaust Representation and Global Memory”
Instructor: Sarah Casteel

Is there such as thing as “global Holocaust memory”? How and why does Holocaust memory circulate across national and cultural borders? How do memories of the Holocaust interact or compete with those of other historical traumas (African slavery, the genocide of Aboriginal peoples) and how has Holocaust memory been reanimated in the service of other political projects? Why did the Holocaust serve as a catalyst to the emergence of memory studies in the late 20th century and to more recent transnational and transcultural directions in the field?

In this course we will begin by discussing classic theorizations of the Holocaust and its relationship to historical and cultural representation, engaging with canonical works of Holocaust literature, film and art. We will then consider the global circulation or “cosmopolitanization” of Holocaust memory through an analysis of literary and visual texts that bring the Holocaust into conversation with colonial histories of trauma, raising thorny issues about uniqueness, comparison and claims to universality. Over the course of the term, we will examine a variety of forms of memory, including: personal, collective, competitive, multidirectional, prosthetic, postmemory, and countermemory. We will give particular attention to the intersection between media and cultural memory and to the role of text, image and other mediums in mediating, preserving or erasing memories of atrocity.

CLMD 6105W/DIGH5902W/MUSI5008W: Issues in the Technologies of Culture
Instructor: Paul Théberge

This course concerns itself with the role that the technologies of print, visual and auditory cultures play in changing models of literacy, visuality and aurality.  This year, emphasis will be placed on technologies of music and sound and on digital technologies. The course will be informed by an understanding of technology as a cultural and social practice and will raise questions about the objective and subjective foundations of knowledge.

Examples to be discussed include technology, economy and ideology; the urban and virtual worlds as visual and aural spaces and spaces of consumption; the construction of time and space; the technologization of the body; the inter-related histories of cinema and sound, music and sound carriers, film and painting, literature, and computers; the scopic and auditory regimes instituted by film, changing sound carriers, mobile devices, the Internet, and digital applications.

CLMD 6105B &BF/FILM 5106W & WF: Issues in the Technologies of Culture: Cinema and Technology
Instructor: Aubrey Anable

This seminar will cover the major theoretical and historiographical approaches to understanding moving image mediacinema, television, the internet, and video gamesas technologies. We will situate our understanding of these media technologies as parts of a broader cultural discourse and imaginary. How has the technological imaginary shifted over time and how can these shifts be traced and analysed from a cultural perspective? How do the questions we ask of visual culture change when we interrogate the technologies of representation? Readings in the course will draw from philosophy, film and media studies, visual studies, science and technology studies, digital media theory, feminist and queer theory, and critical race studies, and post-colonial theory. Topics include: media archaeology, post-humanism, the technological sublime, surveillance, obsolescence, and affect.

CLMD 6900: “Interdisciplinary Research Methods”
Instructor: Sarah Casteel

This course is a continuation of CLMD 6101 in the first semester.

The primary goal of this year-long, workshop-based course for second-year doctoral students is to help students prepare for the second comprehensive examination and dissertation research. The class will offer students a supportive space in which to workshop their second comprehensive examination lists and their preliminary dissertation proposals. Students will work together to develop and exchange ideas about their teaching fields and dissertations with their peers and to benefit from constructive criticism. Be prepared to engage with other students’ scholarship fully and constructively as we discuss, develop and refine plans for future research.

The second major goal of the course is to foster practical skills and knowledge necessary for academic success at the doctoral level and beyond. The course will help students master various aspects of the academic profession including: writing OGS and SSHRC plans of study, becoming acquainted with library resources, academic publishing, conference paper presentations, research ethics and other professional concerns. Further topics will be introduced in response to student need.  (Please note that this course is only open to students in the PhD in Cultural Mediations program).

CLMD 6903W/ENGL 5002W: “Biopolitics, Sentimentality, and Humanitarian Reason”
Instructor: Stuart J. Murray

This course addresses the rhetorics of humanitarianism, and the ways that humanitarian sentiments—the desire to address, redress, or alleviate human suffering—are fostered and mobilized as biopolitical forms of governance, the means by which the biopolitical State increasingly manages and regulates the lives of its populations, both at home and abroad. Where should we place literature and literary tropes in the context of humanitarianism and biopolitics? (click here for syllabus)