FINS 2510 R - Introduction to Quebec Society (English version)

Web course
The evaluation for this course does not include formal seated exams, so no distance proctoring arrangements are required.

This online course surveys geographical, historical, demographic, cultural, political and social developments in Québec, relations with English Canada and debates on identity and nationalism. Also available in French as CDNS 2511/FINS 2511.

Be introduced to Québec from the comfort of your home! Did you know that Canadiens was the sole name of French Canadians until the late XIXth century? That Canada existed for quite some time before 1867? In this fully online course, we will do a survey of geographical, historical, demographical, cultural, political and social developments in Québec, from the colonial period to the present. This course is intended to provide students with a broad understanding of the narrative of Quebec history, incorporating the main themes that continue to shape Quebec's culture and especially its relationship especially its relationship to memory - "Je me souviens." These themes include the evolving structures and values of Quebec society, cultural production and policies, relations with English Canada, and debates on identity and nationalism.

The weekly lectures and mandatory readings are an integral part of this course. With a firmer understanding of Quebec's development, from New France, to the Patriots' Rebellions of 1837-1838, to the period of terrorism in the 1970s and the subsequent referendums on sovereignty, students will be better equipped to pursue their studies in Canadian Studies and Quebec Studies. In particular, students will be able to contribute to debates about federalism, national identity, Quebec's distinctiveness and multiculturalism. No textbook. Mandatory readings are available online.

This course was funded by the Government of Ontario through the Shared Online Course Fund.

CRN for section R: 12426

Instructor: Anne Trepanier

Anne Trepanier

About the instructor: Originally from Quebec City, I graduated in history at Laval University. I then mastered in rhetoric at McGill University, after which I did a second master in political philosophy at Centre Raymon-Aron (EHESS, Paris). I came back to Laval University for a doctorate in Quebec history and historiography and then completed a post-doctorate in sociology at the University of Ottawa.

As a professional educator, I see my task as fostering experiential learning, and I view students as equals. To me, mutual respect is a key component of both teaching and learning. Inspired by Socratic methods, my teaching is student-centered. I see myself as a tour guide, choosing the scenic route and allowing students to have a broader view, conceptual, theoretical or historical, before diving in their own projects.

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For more information, please contact: 613.520.4055 or email CUOL at cuol@carleton.ca