LAWS 2105 V - Social Justice and Human Rights

Theories and practices of law and social justice. Issues examined may include: civil democracy and repression; global governance and the rule of law; democratic movements and social power; human rights instruments, regimes and remedies; armed conflict; and humanitarian intervention. Prerequisite(s): one of LAWS 1000 [1.0], HUMR 1001 [1.0], PAPM 1000 [1.0], PSCI 1100 and PSCI 1200.

Is the law a mere instrument of official policy even if that policy subverts human rights and social justice? Or, is there an intrinsic connection between the concept of the rule of law or legality and the ideals of human rights and social justice? These questions have defined the principal inquiry in modern legal philosophy where the practical stakes that inform this inquiry is the fact that law has often been used to undermine human rights and to systematically wreak injustice. The aim of these lectures is to grapple with this legal-philosophical debate to better understand the status and meaning of ideals like human rights and social justice and the extent to which a commitment to the rule of law may enhance or weaken the practical pursuit of such ideals.

CRN for section V: 13249

CRN for section VOD (optional Video On Demand service): 13250

In-class lecture time & location:
Wednesdays, 8:35am to 11:25am, 624 SA

Instructor: Ratna Balasubramaniam

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