LAWS 3306 V - Crime, Law, Process and Politics

Criminal law process in Canada; structure and use of the process examined for fairness, defects, and possible reform initiatives. Issues concerning gender, race and class bias in the implementation and application of the criminal law. Prerequisite(s): LAWS 2301, LAWS 2302.

The aim of the course is to develop a critical understanding of the constant evolution of criminal law in Canada. We'll examine the way Canadians think, talk and act on criminal justice and how this has shaped the criminal justice system today. The course will be taught from a legal-process perspective that will concern itself with legislative, administrative, judicial and private ordering and their interactions. This process is also rooted in a pragmatic approach to politics that attempts to understand competing perspectives and achieve some form of reconciliation between them.

The course will concentrate on the ongoing conflict and evolution of the due process vs. victims' rights perspective, the parties involved in said conflict (accused, victims, police, public and politicians) and the resulting debates on criminal law currently in the public domain. We will also focus on specific offences and offenders to gain a better understanding of how the ongoing conflict affects criminal law today.

CRN for section V: 13291

CRN for section VOD (optional Video On Demand service): 15116

In-class lecture time & location:
Time & location TBA

Instructor: Paolo Giancaterino

Paolo Giancaterino

Click here for further information about the course.

More about taking courses through CUOL

Registration and Course Section information

For more information, please contact: 613.520.4055 or email CUOL at cuol@carleton.ca