PART I

General
CARLETON UNIVERSITY STATEMENT ON CONDUCT AND HUMAN
RIGHTS

The University as an Academic Community

1. Carleton University is a community of faculty, staff, students and associated
professionals who are engaged in and/or support teaching, learning and research within
an environment of education, work and living. The University’s members, as part of the
community at large, are governed by the law common to all persons.

2. Membership in the University community entails certain rights and responsibilities,
including an obligation to deal ethically and fairly with other members and to not
discriminate or harass. The University requires civil conduct and respect for the rights of
others. It endeavours to provide a safe environment, conducive to personal and
intellectual growth, which is not only free of discrimination, injustice and violence but is
also characterized by understanding, respect, peace, trust, openness and fairness.

3. We believe that universities have a mandate to foster the pursuit of knowledge and, as
our founder, Henry Marshall Tory, said, “the trained intelligence of a nation is its greatest
asset, greater than any material resource.” A central part of the University’s mission is to
advance knowledge and scholarship, providing people who have the ability and desire to
learn with opportunities to realize their intellectual potential.

4. The University’s fundamental commitment to scholarship encourages its members to
perform to the highest standards of academic excellence. The University upholds its
members’ academic freedom so they can carry out their scholarly work without threat of
interference.

4.1 Academic freedom is the freedom to examine, question, teach and learn. It
involves the right to investigate, speculate and comment without reference to
prescribed doctrine, as well as the right to criticize the University and society at large.
Academic freedom carries with it the duty to use that freedom in a manner consistent
with ethical guidelines and human rights law, and the scholarly obligation to base
research and teaching on an honest search for knowledge. It may also be
circumscribed by civil and criminal law.

4.2 The frank discussion of controversial ideas, the examination of various or
competing perspectives, the pursuit and publication of controversial research, and the
study and teaching of material with controversial and even offensive content in the
context of conscientious, professional instruction in the University are protected
within academic freedom.

Responsibilities of Members of the University Community

5. The University and all members of the University community share responsibility for
ensuring that the University’s educational, work and living environments are safe and
free from discrimination and harassment.

5.1 Members of the University who have supervisory authority over others, or who
make or influence decisions regarding members of the University community, bear a
particular responsibility in this regard.

5.2 Academic and administrative managers are expected to foster an environment in
their area that is free of discrimination or harassment, to not condone or disregard
activities within their areas of responsibility that violate or disregard human rights, and
to act in a timely, proactive and effective manner if they become aware of any
violation of University policies.

Human Rights Protected

6. The University respects the rights of speech and dissent and upholds the right to
peaceful assembly and expression of dissent.

7. The University promotes equity and diversity. Every member of the University
community has a right to study, work and live in a safe environment free of
discrimination or harassment, including sexual harassment.

8. The grounds on which the University strives to provide accommodation and protect
against discrimination and harassment include race, ancestry, place of origin, colour,
ethnic origin, citizenship, creed, political affiliation or belief, sex, sexual orientation,
gender identity, age, marital status, family status and disability within the meaning of the
Ontario Human Rights Code.

8.1 The right to equal treatment without discrimination on the basis of disability
includes the University’s duty, to the point of undue hardship, to accommodate a
person with a disability.

8.2 Occupants of residential accommodation are protected against discrimination and
harassment on the basis of receipt of public assistance.

8.3 Employees of the University are protected against discrimination and harassment
on the basis of record of offences as provided in the Code.

9. Discrimination is understood as a practice or action, whether intentional or not, and
based upon prohibited grounds of discrimination, that imposes burdens, obligations or
disadvantages on an individual or group that are not imposed on others, or that withholds
or limits access to opportunities, benefits and advantages available to other members of
the University community.

10. Harassment is understood as engagement in conduct (including innuendo), based on a
human rights ground protected in this Statement, that is abusive, demeaning, threatening,
vexatious or intimidating or involves the misuse of authority or power that exceeds the
bounds of freedom of expression or academic freedom.

11. Discrimination and harassment can occur on the basis of one or more intersecting
human rights grounds; between individuals of the same or different status; between
individuals or groups; during one incident or over a series of incidents including single
incidents that in isolation would not necessarily constitute harassment or discrimination;
and on or off the premises of the University, during or after University hours.

12. The University also recognizes that systemic discrimination (sometimes referred to as
a “chilly climate”) may subsist in aspects of the University’s functioning and is
committed to addressing systemic human rights issues through inquiry and remedial
action as required.

Offences of Misconduct

13. No member of the University community may engage in violent, threatening,
disruptive, abusive or obstructive misconduct, including misuse of computing facilities,
affecting any activity or service of the University or its members. Consistent with
academic regulations, it is an instructional offence for a student registered in a course to
disrupt a class or other period of instruction and to persist in the disruptive conduct after
being warned by the instructor to discontinue.

14. No member of the University community may engage in conduct that causes another
person to fear for his or her safety or the safety of another person known to him or her
while on University premises or in the course of activities sponsored by the University, or
that causes another person to be impeded in exercising the freedom to participate
reasonably in the programs and activities of the University when he or she knows that his
or her conduct will cause such fear, or are reckless as to whether his or her conduct
causes such fear.

15. Unacceptable conduct includes stalking, repeated following, persistent direct or
indirect unwelcome communication, besetting or repeated watching of a place of work,
recreation or residence, or threatening conduct including verbal or physical threats
directed at the other person or any member of their family, friends or colleagues.

16. No member of the University community may damage, interfere with or misuse
property belonging to the University or to its members, including electronically stored
information, when such property is on University premises or on other premises during
the course of a University-sponsored activity or event.

17. No person other than a peace officer shall possess or use any firearm, weapon or
ammunition on the premises of Carleton University without the permission of the
President of the University or their designate.

Actions by Individuals who are not Members of the University Community

18. Contractors, their employees and representatives, people who access University
services, and visitors to the University, including volunteers, are expected to conduct
themselves in any University-related activity in a manner consistent with University
policies.

19. Allegations of discrimination, harassment or misconduct against such persons will be
dealt with by management as potential breaches of contract and/or may result in
suspension of University privileges such as access to campus or University services.

20. Students in co-op placements, exchanges, internships or other work/study placements
are also protected from discrimination, harassment and misconduct. The University is
committed to providing counselling and educational support as required for students who
experience such violations, assisting them in making complaints to the Ontario Human
Rights Commission or other appropriate bodies, and may take such other actions against
the external placement provider as it deems appropriate.

Equity Services and Education

21. The University is committed to educating administrators in the objectives and
implementation of equity, accommodation and non-discrimination policies, including
training programs that assist in handling or preventing problems, ensuring that all of its
members are aware of the nature of discrimination and harassment and providing support
and counselling for those affected by discrimination and harassment.

22. The University is committed to maintaining an Equity Services Office with the
capacity to effectively serve the needs of the University community. Staff of that office
(referred to as Equity Advisors) will be provided with appropriate training and the
institutional support and assistance required to discharge their responsibilities.

University Policies and Procedures

23. A number of specific University policies and procedures (including regulations for
instructional offences, personnel policies, computer usage policies, and human rights
policies) further articulate these commitments of the University. Where there is no
specific policy, a request for action or complaint may be initiated pursuant to this
Statement.

24. These policies and procedures operate in conjunction with provisions in collective
agreements and provincial employment and human rights legislation. Using University
policies and procedures does not preclude a complainant from instituting criminal or civil
proceedings, a grievance, or a complaint to the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal.

25. A person who believes he or she has been discriminated against or harassed
on a human rights ground specified in this Statement may make a request for
action or initiate a complaint pursuant to the Human Rights Conflict Resolution
and Complaint Procedure. Allegations of instructional offences are handled as
specified in the University Calendar. Offences of misconduct are handled by the
appropriate University office or University Safety.

PART II

EQUITY POLICIES
II.1 EDUCATIONAL EQUITY POLICY

Preamble

This policy supports Carleton University’s commitment to sections 15 and 28 of the
Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, sections 1, 5 and 14 of the Ontario Human
Rights Code, and the University’s Statement on Conduct and Human Rights.

Principles

1. Carleton University is committed to excellence in teaching, scholarship and research
and to providing equity in its educational programs and services.

2. The University strives to provide the best possible educational experience for all of its
students and to encourage and assist all students to succeed academically and as members
of the University community.

3. The commitment to provide educational equity extends to members of disadvantaged
groups as outlined in the University’s Statement on Conduct and Human Rights, and
includes international students within these categories.

Policy

4. Carleton University is committed to identifying University policies, programs and
services that need to be changed, enhanced or created (subject to the availability of
resources) in order to:

4.1 Increase the access, retention and graduation of groups of students who have
traditionally been under-represented, underserved and/or disadvantaged in University
programs; and
4.2 Provide and maintain a supportive, hospitable and welcoming educational
environment for all students, faculty, staff and associated professionals in the
University.

5. The University is committed to providing accommodation on human rights grounds to
students to the point of undue hardship (considering cost, outside sources of funding, if
any, and health and safety requirements) and to implementing special measures as
required to achieve the University’s educational equity goals.

6. The University undertakes to provide education and training to faculty, staff and
students on human rights issues as these relate, inter alia, to curriculum and pedagogy.

Implementation

7. It is the responsibility of the Offices responsible for admission, student services and
academic planning to coordinate on matters related to education equity under the
direction of Senate, assisted by the Senate Committee on Educational Equity, which
reports each year to Senate.

8. Equity Services and any other units responsible for pedagogical support are
responsible for coordinating education and training (in consultation with individual units
as appropriate) as specified in this policy.

9. As applicable, education equity indicators shall be built into the components
considered in formal, internal assessment of programs and academic and administrative
units.

Problem Solving

10. Anyone who has a concern related to implementation of this Policy may bring it in
writing to the Senate Committee on Educational Equity.

II.2 EMPLOYMENT EQUITY POLICY

Preamble

This Policy supports Carleton University’s commitment to sections 15 and 28 of the
Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, to sections 1, 5 and 14 of the Ontario Human
Rights Code, the Federal Contractors Program, provincial employment legislation,
including the Employment Standards Act and the Labour Relations Act, the University’s
collective agreements with its bargaining units, and the University’s Statement on
Conduct and Human Rights.

Principles

1. Carleton University is committed to providing equity in employment (including pay
equity) and maintaining a supportive, hospitable and welcoming employment
environment for all individuals.

2. The University is committed to achieving and maintaining a diverse workforce and to
initiating special measures as required to ensure full participation and advancement of
employees in groups that have traditionally been under-represented, to enable them to
compete for positions and work with others on an equal basis.

3. The groups designated for measurement of employment equity include women,
Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, racialized or visible minorities, and such
other groups as may be agreed from time to time by the University and its bargaining
units or designated by legislation.

4. The University is also committed to providing accommodation on human rights
grounds to employees to the point of undue hardship (considering cost, outside sources of
funding, if any, and health and safety requirements) to enable them to perform the
essential duties of their job.

Policy

5. The primary criterion for appointment to positions at the University is academic,
professional, administrative or technical excellence as applicable. No candidate shall be
recommended for appointment who does not meet the criteria for the appointment in
question. The best available candidate should be hired, regardless of membership in a
designated group.

6. Where the qualifications of two candidates for appointment are demonstrably equal,
and one of these candidates is a member of a group that is under-represented in
continuing appointment positions in a unit, then, all else being equal, the candidate of the
under-represented group should be offered the position.

7. The University undertakes to use search procedures that require an active search for
qualified members of under-represented groups.

8. Appointment or search committees are required to familiarize themselves with employment
equity guidelines,  principles, objectives, recent history, best practices, and rules and
institutional expectations with respect to employment equity.
Committees may also designate one member to have specific responsibility for employment equity;
that person may request additional in-depth training to assist him or her in this role.

9. In the evaluation of candidates for appointment, confirmation, renewal, tenure and
promotion, the criteria adopted must not systematically discriminate against members of
designated groups and shall be reviewed periodically by deans and directors to ensure
that the criteria do not undervalue work that is done predominantly by members of the
designated groups. Committees are required to take special care not to eliminate at early
stages potentially strong candidates who are members of designated groups.

10. The University undertakes to identify and remove any discriminatory policies and
practices found in the recruitment, selection, transfer, promotion, performance appraisal,
training, career development, compensation, benefits, termination and working conditions
of employees in all levels and categories of employment.

Implementation

11. The President of the University has primary responsibility for the University’s
employment equity program. The vice-presidents (Office of Provost and Vice-President
Academic; Finance and Administration), assisted by their deans and directors, are
responsible for implementing steps in the employment equity program.

12. Implementation of employment equity is at the University level and the unit level. A
unit is defined as a recognized grouping having primary responsibility to generate
recommendations for appointment into positions.

13. In designing and implementing employment equity, University management shall
coordinate and cooperate with bargaining units on campus through joint union
management committees. Management and unions should also consult with the Office of
Equity Services and university or community organizations that represent the target
groups of any program. Such representatives may be invited to participate in the work of
such committees.

14. The terms of the employment equity plan for the University are to be provided to the
bargaining units on campus by Equity Services and the Human Resources Department
and may be incorporated as applicable into the relevant collective agreements with
agreement of management and the bargaining unit. The plan should also be available in
the Office of the President for consultation by any member of the University community.

15. Current documentation and guidelines on employment equity are to be provided to
deans and directors, chairs and directors of schools, and unit heads by Equity Services.
Training on related human rights issues shall be provided to these individuals at least biannually
by the Human Resources Department and the Office of Equity Services, in
consultation with any officer of the University responsible for employment equity. The
University will also provide ongoing education and training to all employees on human
rights issues.

16. For the purposes of implementing this policy, under-representation of designated
groups will be assessed using the latest employment equity National Occupational
Classification (NOC) data on external availability as the benchmark where appropriate.
With the assistance of the Office of Institutional Research and Planning, the University
will undertake assessment on a regular basis of the representation of target groups in its
workforce by carrying out a workforce analysis, comparing representation levels in the
University with relevant external data, determining under-representation, and establishing
goals, timetables and methods for increasing representation.

17. Employment equity considerations are to be incorporated into employment systems
review and process redesign initiatives.

Problem Solving

18. Anyone who has a concern related to implementation of this Policy may bring it in
writing to the Equity Policy Committee.

PART III

ACCOMMODATION POLICIES

III. 1. ACADEMIC ACCOMMODATION

Statement on Academic Accommodation

1. Carleton University is committed to providing access to the educational experience in
order to promote academic accessibility for all individuals.

2. Academic accommodation policies are one of the ways in which the University
implements its Educational Equity Policy and its commitment to sections 11 and 17 of
the Ontario Human Rights Code, which requires the University in the provision of
services (including education) to accommodate individuals on human rights grounds to
the point of undue hardship considering the cost, outside sources of funding, if any, and
health and safety requirements, if any.

3. Academic accommodation refers to educational practices, systems and support
mechanisms designed to accommodate diversity and difference. The purpose of
accommodation is to enable students to perform the essential requirements of their
academic programs. At no time does academic accommodation undermine or
compromise the learning objectives that are established by the academic authorities of the
University.

4. Academic accommodation is assessed and provided on an individual basis. The
University is committed to maintaining confidentiality to the greatest extent possible
when providing academic accommodation and related support services to students.

5. Carleton University endeavors, within the parameters of its mandate as a secular
institution, to provide appropriate space for religious or spiritual observance considered
integral to a holistic learning environment and, in particular, the University acknowledges
the central importance of traditional, cultural and spiritual practices of Aboriginal peoples
in sustaining for them the educational vitality of the institution.

6. The University recognizes that students with infectious illnesses have the right to
pursue those activities that their medical condition and public health allow, including
continuing to study. The University does not tolerate discrimination, stigma or
harassment on the basis of infectious illness, including HIV/AIDS. Individuals with
infectious illness are encouraged to inform University Health and Counselling Services in
order that support and accommodation can be arranged as required.

7. The terms of the Academic Accommodation Policies are kept under review by the
Senate Committee on Educational Equity.

III.1.

1. Academic Accommodation Policy for Students with Disabilities

Principles

1. Carleton University is committed to providing access to the educational experience and
accommodation to the point of undue hardship in order to promote academic accessibility
for individuals with identified and duly assessed disabilities. The University encourages
applications from students with those disabilities within the meaning of the Ontario
Human Rights Code, including visual, hearing, communication and mobility impairments
and learning and other non-visible disabilities.

2. The University affirms its commitment to the physical accessibility of the Carleton
campus, and to the assessment of academic accommodation for students with disabilities
in order to maintain its leadership among the province’s educational institutions in
implementing accessibility.

3. The Paul Menton Centre for Students with Disabilities (PMC) is the designated unit at
the University for assisting the Carleton community in integrating persons with
disabilities into all aspects of Carleton’s academic and community life. The PMC
provides assessment of academic accommodation, advises students on strategies to open
a dialogue with instructors and acts as consultant, facilitator, coordinator and advocate in
this area for all members of the University community.

4. The University promotes efforts to accommodate students with disabilities so that they
can meet the learning objectives of courses they are taking and be fairly evaluated in their
performance.

Policy

5. In order to secure appropriate academic accommodation, students with disabilities are
responsible for identifying their individual needs to the PMC in such a manner as to
facilitate an appropriate response from the University.

6. Academic accommodation is assessed and provided on an individual basis.
Limitations that are traditionally attributed to a particular disabling condition cannot, and
should not, be generalized. The University is committed to maintaining confidentiality to
the greatest extent possible when providing academic accommodation and related support
services to students.

7. Students with disabilities who request academic accommodation must provide the
PMC with relevant professional supporting documentation as determined by the
University, generally from a regulated health professional practitioner (e.g., a physician,
psychiatrist, clinical psychologist). The documentation must include a statement that the
individual has an ongoing, recognized disability that requires academic accommodation.
Students with learning disabilities must provide a summary of the results of a complete
psycho-educational assessment conducted by an appropriate registered psychologist. All
documentation must be current.

8. Once students with disabilities identify their individual needs for academic
accommodation, PMC staff members assess the appropriateness of the student’s requests,
then formally recommend appropriate means of academic accommodation by means of a
“Letter of Accommodation.”

9. A student with a “Letter of Accommodation” should meet with each of their
instructors as soon as possible to discuss the academic accommodations recommended
and to reach an agreement on an appropriate accommodation for that course. The
instructor may contact PMC for further consultation as needed.

10. A student suffering from a serious, disabling illness may request a period of leave
from their studies, initially of up to one year or three academic sessions. The parameters
and procedures to be followed are those set out in “Student Parental Leave,” (sec.III.3)
with the necessary adjustments.

Implementation

11. Members of faculty and instructional staff, supported by administrative staff, share
the University’s responsibility under the Ontario Human Rights Code for academic
accommodation of students with disabilities. This policy encourages dialogue between
instructors and students as to how the needs of individuals can be accommodated within
the terms of legislation and current University guidelines in the area. All such dealings
require mutual understanding and respect from the parties involved in the
accommodation process.

12. PMC is responsible for coordinating the provision of comprehensive and professional
services necessary to respond to the needs of students with disabilities. It is responsible
for assessing the needs for academic accommodation of students with disabilities through
assessments that are carried out on an individual basis, in accordance with related
legislation, and on the basis of relevant professional/medical documentation, information
gathered from the student, and evaluation by PMC staff.

13. Practices and procedures in the process of accommodation are available from the
PMC.

Appeal Process

14. In cases regarding academic accommodation of students with disabilities, any dispute
unresolved by discussion between the student and instructor may be appealed first to the
Department Chair or School Director and thereafter to the Dean of the Faculty in which
the student is registered. The appeal process is intended to comply with the existing
academic appeal mechanism and procedures of the University.

III.1.
2. Academic Accommodation Policy for Student Religious Obligations

Principles
1. Carleton University accommodates students who, by reason of religious obligation,
must miss an examination, test, assignment deadline, laboratory or other compulsory
academic event.

Policy

2. Students requesting academic accommodation on the basis of religious obligation
should make a formal, written request to their instructor(s) for alternative dates and/or
means of satisfying requirements. Such requests should be made during the first two
weeks of any given academic term, or as soon as possible after a need for accommodation
is known to exist, but in no case later than second-last week of classes in that term.

3. When a student’s presence is required prior to the date on which classes begin (e.g., for
field trips), any student who cannot meet this expectation of attendance for reasons of
religious obligation should notify their Instructor in advance.

Implementation

4. Accommodation is to be worked out directly and on an individual basis between the
student and the instructor(s) involved. Instructors will make accommodation in a way that
avoids academic disadvantage to the student.

5. Students or instructors who have questions or wish to confirm the eligibility of a
religious event or practice should contact Equity Services.

Appeal Process

6. In cases regarding academic accommodation of students on the basis of religious
obligation, any dispute unresolved by discussion between the student and instructor may
be appealed, first to the Department Chair or School Director and thereafter to the Dean
of the Faculty in which the student is registered. The appeal process is intended to
comply with the existing academic appeal mechanism and procedures of the University.

III.1
3. Academic Accommodation Policy for Students on the Basis of Sex or
Family Status: Student Parental Leave

Principles

1. The Student Parental Leave Policy is intended to recognize the need for leave at the
time of a pregnancy, birth or adoption and to permit a pause in studies in order to provide
full-time care in the first year of parenting a child or for health-related parental
responsibilities.

Policy: Graduate Students

2. Either parent may request up to three terms of leave, which must be completed within
12 months of the date of birth or custody or request for leave for health-related family
responsibilities. Where both parents are Graduate students seeking parental leave, the
total number of terms of leave may not exceed four.

3. While on parental leave, Graduate students do not register or pay fees to Carleton
University. Students on parental leave who wish to make use of library, e-mail, Carleton
Central, or other university facilities or consult their supervisor or other faculty members
should consult the Dean of their Faculty or the Dean of Graduate and Postdoctoral
Affairs.

4. Graduate students on parental leave are not eligible to receive fellowship or
scholarship support from Carleton University but they may defer their fellowships or
scholarships until they return from leave. In the case of other fellowships or scholarships,
the regulations of the particular granting agency will apply. Teaching and research
assistantships are subject to the provisions of the CUPE 4600 Collective Agreement.

5. The terminal date of the degree program in which the Graduate student is registered
will be extended by the duration of the parental leave taken. Normally, the start and
finish of the leave will coincide with the beginning and end of a term.

Policy: Undergraduate Students

6. No formal application for parental leave is required by undergraduate students unless
the absence is expected to extend beyond 9 terms or 3 years. Undergraduate students are
permitted to be absent from studies, for any reason, for a period of 9 consecutive terms
and will not be removed from their degree program during this time period. Degree
students who have been away from the university for more than nine consecutive terms
must apply for readmission through Admission Services.

Note: students registered in an Honours project should contact their honours supervisor
before taking a leave of absence.

Implementation

7. Graduate students may apply for parental leave in writing to the Graduate Registrar’s
Office of the Dean of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs. Appropriate documentation
(e.g., medical and/or legal) must be attached.

8. Special needs or circumstances not covered by the terms of the Policy should be
brought to the attention of the Faculty Dean to facilitate appropriate resolution.

9. Where a continuing student (graduate or undergraduate) who is pregnant requires a
temporary modification of the conditions of her academic program (e.g., laboratory or
field work) that can be accommodated without compromising the integrity of her overall
program of studies, every reasonable effort to the point of undue hardship will be made to
accommodate her, in consultation between the student and her instructor or supervisor, if
necessary assisted by the Department Chair or School Director and/or Faculty Dean.
Equity Services may also be consulted and provide advice and assistance.

Appeal Process

10. In cases regarding academic accommodation of students (graduate or undergraduate)
on the basis of sex or family status, any dispute unresolved by discussion between the
student and instructor may be appealed first to the Department Chair or School Director
and thereafter to the Dean of the Faculty in which the student is registered. The appeal
process is intended to comply with the existing academic appeal mechanism and
procedures of the University.

III. 2. EMPLOYMENT ACCOMMODATION
Statement on Employment Accommodation

1. Carleton University is committed to providing access to employment so that no
individual experiences reduced access to employment opportunities or benefits on the
basis of their membership in a group for which human rights protection is provided.

2. Employment accommodation policies are one of the ways in which the University
implements its Employment Equity Policy and its commitment to sections 11, 17 and 24
of Ontario Human Rights Code, which requires the University, as an employer, to
accommodate employees on the basis of human rights grounds to the point of undue
hardship considering the cost, outside sources of funding, if any, and health and safety
requirements, if any.

3. The purpose of employment accommodation is to enable employees to perform the
essential requirements of their jobs. The University strives to accommodate both
employees and job applicants in a way that respects their dignity, is equitable, and
enhances their ability to compete for jobs, perform their work, and fully participate in
employment at Carleton. Accommodation is viewed as a protection of human rights.

4. Employment accommodation refers to employment practices, systems and support
mechanisms designed to accommodate diversity and difference. Accommodation may
mean making changes to the working environment to allow for the most efficient use of
an employee’s skills in order that the essential requirements of the job may be met. The
period of accommodation may be temporary or permanent, depending on the particular
circumstances.

5. Employment accommodation is assessed and provided on an individual basis. The
University is committed to maintaining confidentiality to the greatest extent possible
when providing accommodation and related support services to employees.

6. The University recognizes that employees with infectious illnesses have the right to
pursue those activities that their medical condition and public health allow, including
continuing to work. The University does not tolerate discrimination, stigma or
harassment on the basis of infectious illness, including HIV/AIDS. Individuals with
infectious illness are encouraged to inform University Health Services and/or their
manager in order that support and accommodation can be provided as required.

7. The test for undue hardship is assessed at the corporate level, not the departmental
level. Thus, in most cases that may arise at the University, there will be a requirement
that the employee be accommodated, provided that he or she can perform the essential
duties of the job.

8. Both the employing work unit and the central administration of the University have a
role in providing accommodation to employees; managers and supervisors share the
University’s responsibility in implementing this policy. For record-keeping and reporting
purposes, units are asked to notify both the Human Resources Department and Equity
Services of all accommodations made.

9. The terms of the Employment Accommodation Policies are kept under review by the
Equity Policy Committee.

III.2.

1. Accommodation Policy for Employees with Disabilities

Policy

1. Carleton University encourages applications from individuals with disabilities included
within the meaning of the Ontario Human Rights Code, including visual, hearing,
communication and mobility impairments and learning and other non-visible disabilities.
Information to applicants and interview candidates should signal that the University is
prepared to accommodate disabilities in the selection, testing and interview process and
identify whom the applicant should contact for the necessary arrangements to be made.

2. In order to secure appropriate accommodation, employees with disabilities are
responsible for identifying their individual needs to their manager and (assisted as
appropriate by the employee’s bargaining agent) working with the manager to develop
and implement an accommodation plan.

3. Employees with disabilities who request accommodation must provide their manager
with relevant professional supporting documentation as determined by the University,
generally from a regulated health professional practitioner (e.g., a physician, psychiatrist,
clinical psychologist). The documentation must include a statement that the individual
has an ongoing, recognized disability that requires accommodation and must specify the
resulting limitations to the performance of the employee’s job. The University has a right
to request a separate medical opinion.

4. If needed to clarify the accommodation requested or the adjustment in work tasks, the
employee must be willing to sign a consent to release to the Human Resources
Department, at Carleton University, relevant accommodation information for the
disabling condition in question.

Implementation

5. This policy encourages dialogue between managers and employees as to how the needs
of individuals can be accommodated within the terms of the legislation and current
University guidelines in the area. All such dealings require mutual understanding and
respect from the parties involved in the accommodation process.

6. Employment accommodation is assessed and provided on an individual basis. For
example, limitations that are traditionally attributed to a particular disabling condition
cannot, and should not, be generalized. The University is committed to maintaining
confidentiality to the greatest extent possible when providing accommodation and related
support services to employees.

7. The Manager is responsible for identifying the essential duties of the employee’s job.
If the employee can perform the essential duties of the job, arrangements must be made
for appropriate accommodation. Examples of possible accommodation are appended to
this Policy.

8. If a Manager determines that an employee cannot perform the essential duties of the
job, he or she must consult the Assistant Vice-President (Human Resources) and the
Director of Equity Services before taking any action. Furthermore, the employee may
request that their bargaining unit be notified and a representative of the union participate
in discussions related to this issue.

9. Where possible, the employing work unit is expected to carry the cost of any
accommodation. If the employing work unit is unable to carry the cost of the
accommodation, the Chair or Director or the unit manager will contact the relevant
Resource Planning Committee (RPC) for funding. If costs are beyond the ability of the
RPC to carry, the RPC Chair can apply to the Vice-President (Finance and
Administration) for funding of the accommodation.

Problem Solving

10. The parties involved may seek advice at any time from Equity Services and/or the
Human Resources Department, which may also provide assistance for communicating the
situation to others in the workplace.

11. While every effort will be made to provide accommodation, there may be times when
it is not possible to do so. If managers conclude that they cannot accommodate an
employee’s request for accommodation, they will meet and discuss the situation with the
Assistant Vice-President (Human Resources) and the Director of Equity Services.

Examples of Accommodation of Individuals with Disabilities

To provide some guidance, the following are given as examples of the types of
accommodation that could be provided, subject to cost, outside sources of funding, if any,
and health and safety requirements, if any:

Work station modifications: specialized or adjustable furniture, signs with raised or
Braille lettering, modified lighting, flashing signals, and handrails;
Job redesign: the reassignment of duties or the restructuring of job tasks for both the
person with a disability and coworkers;

Employment policy and practice modifications:
flexible or part-time hours;
Technical aids and devices: environmental control units (e.g., remote control to open
and close doors, operate lights), hoists, grips, technical devices for the deaf, infrared
systems, FM broadcast systems, Braille computer printers, optical character recognition
systems, keyboard adaptations and the training and technical support required to use
technical aids and devices and ergonomic furniture;

Building modifications: ramps, retrofitted washrooms, elevators with audio signals,
lowered elevator panels, automatic doors, visual-display alarm systems, suitable
designated parking spaces;

Accessible transportation: for employment-related activities that are held outside of the
place where work is routinely performed;

Communication services: captioning, sign language interpreters, in-meeting notetakers,
personal FM systems, transcription services from print to alternate formats (audio tape,
Braille or computer disk);

Human support services: personnel provided to assist in accommodation.

III.2.
2. Accommodation Policy for Employee Religious Obligations

Principles

1. Carleton University accommodates employees who, by reason of religious obligation,
must miss work for all or part of a day.

2. Where reasonably feasible, managers should make scheduling or other arrangements
(e.g., flex-time) so that employees do not lose pay in order to meet their duly requested
religious obligations. In the event leave is required, while there is an obligation to provide
duly requested religious accommodation, it may not always be possible to provide paid
leave. Whether an employee is entitled to paid leave for the purpose of meeting their
religious obligations will depend upon their employment status and the terms and
conditions applicable to their relevant employee group.

Implementation

3. Employees who seek religious accommodation must give at least five days’ notice to
their supervisor. In the case of emergency or unusual circumstances, every reasonable
effort will be made by the supervisor to accommodate requests made with fewer than five
days’ notice, but approval of leave in this circumstance is not assured.

4. Employees or supervisors who have questions or wish to verify the eligibility of the
religious event or practice involved should contact the Equity Services.

5. This policy encourages dialogue between managers and employees as to how the needs
of individuals can be accommodated within the terms of the legislation and current
University guidelines in the area. All such dealings require mutual understanding and
respect from the parties involved in the accommodation process.

Problem Solving

6. The parties involved may seek advice at any time from Equity Services and/or the
Human Resources Department, which may also provide assistance for communicating the
situation to others in the workplace.

7. While every effort will be made to provide accommodation, there may be times when
it is not possible to do so. If managers conclude that they cannot accommodate an
employee’s request for accommodation due to religious obligation, they will meet and
discuss the situation with the Assistant Vice-President (Human Resources) and the
Director of Equity Services.

III.2
3. Accommodation Policy for Employees on the Basis of Sex (Pregnancy): Work
Reassignment

Principles

1. The procedures set out in this policy are intended to provide the opportunity for
employees to continue to work when faced with a pregnancy that renders them
temporarily incapable of performing their regular duties.

2. A pregnancy work reassignment is a temporarily modified work assignment wherein
an employee is pregnant and, barring medical complications, will return to her normal
duties. The Policy for Work Reassignment Due to Pregnancy is intended to recognize
situations where a pregnant employee’s safety or the safety of others may be in jeopardy
should she continue to perform her regularly assigned duties.

3. The terms of pregnancy and parental leave available to employees are as contained in
applicable provincial legislation and/or collective agreements or the University Personnel
Policy.

Policy

4. Managers will make every effort to accommodate an employee’s request for a
pregnancy work assignment for a reasonable time where possible and feasible within the
department.

5. Dialogue is encouraged between managers and employees as to how the needs of
individuals can be accommodated within the terms of the legislation and current
University guidelines in the area. All such dealings require mutual understanding and
respect from the parties involved in the accommodation process.

Implementation

6. An employee seeking work reassignment due to pregnancy must submit a written
request for a pregnancy work assignment to her immediate supervisor. The request must
be accompanied by a physician’s recommendation that specifies work limitations if work
continues in the present environment and defines the duration of the requested
accommodation.

7. If needed to clarify the accommodation requested or the adjustment in work tasks, the
employee must be willing to sign a consent form to release, to the Human Resources
Department at Carleton University, relevant accommodation information for the
pregnancy.

8. Upon acceptance of the request, managers will prepare, in writing, a plan for alternate
or modified duties that the employee can reasonably perform, given their medical
assessment.

9. Any requests for extensions of the work assignment due to pregnancy must be made in
writing and accompanied by new medical documentation.

Problem Solving

10. The parties involved may seek advice at any time from Equity Services or the Human
Resources Department, which may also provide assistance for communicating the
situation to others in the workplace

11. While every effort will be made to provide accommodation, there may be times when
that is not possible. If managers conclude that they cannot accommodate an employee’s
request for accommodation, they will meet and discuss the situation with the Assistant
Vice-President (Human Resources) and the Director of Equity Services.