Previous Courses Taught

Summer 2018:

EURR 4104/5104; PSCI 4608/5608: EUROPEAN INTEGRATION AND EUROPEAN SECURITY 

The goals of the course are as follows:
a) To familiarize students with the main security challenges facing Europe
b) To problematize the concept of ‘security’ and its boundaries
c) To learn about the EU’s security strategy, its origins, motivations, and influences
d) To understand the main security structures, policies, and practices in the EU
e) To relate EU security structures and processes to other security organizations and
actors
f) To analyze the relationship between EU and EU Member state approaches to
security

Winter 2018:

EURR4106A/PSCI4609A: EU Enlargement: Past, Present, Future

Among the most important goals of this course are the following:
a) To familiarize students with the history, importance, and processes of EU
enlargement
b) To access the social, economic, and political impacts of accession in the new member
states, with a particular focus on the 2004 and 2007 enlargements
c) To consider prospects for future enlargement and their potential significance for the
EU and for Europe.

Please find the course outline here

EURR5205/PSCI5111/INAF5807: The European Union and its Eastern Neighbours

The course will examine relations between the European Union (and its members states) and post-communist countries to the east, including Azerbaijan, Armenia, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, Russia, and Ukraine. Examples from a range of policy areas will be drawn upon, including border and visa policy, energy policy, and security issues in the post-Soviet space. Implications of Russian initiatives, such as the Eurasian Economic Union, will also be explored. Recent developments, including the Ukraine crisis, will be discussed and analyzed. The course examines the material from the perspective of various actors, to avoid either a Eurocentric or Russocentric approach. Please find the course outline here.

Winter 2017:

EURR 2002: Europe and Russia in the World. This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the position of Europe, the European Union, and the Russian Federation in international affairs. The temporal focus is on the period following the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe. Please find the course outline here.

EURR 5010: Research Design and Methodology, EU and European Studies (co-taught with Professor James Casteel). This course for graduate students examines various issues in research design and methodology, with examples from the academic literature. It is designed to support EURUS MA students from the EU concentration in drawing up research proposals for their theses or research essays. Please find the course outline here.

EURR 5205: The European Union and its Eastern Neighbours. The course will examine relations between the European Union (and its members states) and post-communist countries to the east, including Azerbaijan, Armenia, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, Russia, and Ukraine. Examples from a range of policy areas will be drawn upon, including border and visa policy, energy policy, and security issues in the post-Soviet space. Implications of Russian initiatives, such as the Eurasian Economic Union, will also be explored. Recent developments, including the Ukraine crisis, will be discussed and analyzed. The course examines the material from the perspective of various actors, to avoid either a Eurocentric or Russocentric approach. Please find the course outline here.

Fall 2017:

EURR 5001A Interdisciplinary Seminar: EU and European Stream (co-taught with Professor James Casteel). This course is the core interdisciplinary seminar for EURUS MA students in the EU concentration. It serves to familiarize students with major directions of research and debates in the field of study; to examine themes and approaches within major disciplines (Political Science, Economics, Sociology, History, Cultural Studies, International Affairs, and Law); and to assess the importance and utility of these disciplines’ theories and concepts in studying the region. The course considers developments at the national and EU levels, as well as differences and similarities between sub-regions of Europe. Please find the course outline here.

Fall 2016:

EURR 5001A Interdisciplinary Seminar: EU and European Stream (co-taught with Professor James Casteel). This course is the core interdisciplinary seminar for EURUS MA students in the EU concentration. It serves to familiarize students with major directions of research and debates in the field of study; to examine themes and approaches within major disciplines (Political Science, Economics, Sociology, History, Cultural Studies, International Affairs, and Law); and to assess the importance and utility of these disciplines’ theories and concepts in studying the region. The course considers developments at the national and EU levels, as well as differences and similarities between sub-regions of Europe. Please find the course outline here.