Early Fall 2019 Session

The Late Fall 2019 Session will feature thirteen lecture series, two writing workshops, and three language workshops, as detailed below. (You can also view and print a PDF version of Learning in Retirement’s Early and Late Fall 2019 Session brochure.)

Note that our program now has TWO locations: main campus, and the new Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre. Please check your lecture or workshop’s location carefully.

Registration for the Early and Late Fall 2019 Sessions is now open! Please visit our registration page to register now.

Parking symbol legend:
Parking legend. Double PP letters indicate prepaid virtual parking and PAYG indicates pay-as-you-go metered parking is available on a first-come first-served basis.

Lecture Series
1. Alphabestiary – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
2. What Can We Learn from Shady Science?
3. Spy Fiction: Classics of the 20th and 21st Centuries – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
4. Life of Stars
5. Baroque Music: More Than Meets the Ear – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
6. Babylon to the Big Bang: The First Billion Miles – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
7. The Brain and the Mind: The Neuropsychology of Being Human – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
8. Finance Matters: Capital, Cryptocurrencies, and Much More
9. A Brief History of Ancient Greece – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
10. The Story of Rock and Roll: 1951-1966 – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
11. Jane Austen’s England – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
12. Quantum Weirdness for Beginners – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
13. Iran’s Foreign Policy After 2015: Politics of Normalizers and Conservatives

Writing Workshop
1. Writing the Stories of My Life: Remembering My Mother – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
2. Writing the Stories of My Life: Remembering Through Space and Time – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Language Workshops
1. Italian for Travellers Level I, Part II
2. Italian for Travellers Level I – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
3. Spanish for Travellers Level I – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN


Lecture Series

Lecture Series 1
Alphabestiary – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: H. Masud Taj

Animals help us see the world afresh. Interweaving poetry, science, calligraphy, history, art and philosophy, we delve into astounding realities of animals, each encapsulated in a word: Ants, Bulls, Cats, Dragonflies, Elephants, Fireflies, Grasshoppers, Horses, Iguanas, Jellyfishes, Kangaroos, Lions, Mosquitoes, Newts, Owls, Parrots, Quails, Rats, Sheep, Tigers, Umbrellabirds, Vipers, Whales, Xolos, Yaks and Zebras. This lecture series is as much about us as it is about the animals that help us regain our sense of wonder.

  • Days: Mondays, September 9 – October 21 (no class October 14)
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 40 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer H. Masud TajLecturer biography: H. Masud Taj, award winning adjunct professor at the Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism, wrote on the Bombay Zoo in his series on Public Places (Habitat Forum Berlin conference in Mumbai). A decade later he held his first solo exhibition “Downloading Animals” at Alliance Francaise de Bombay. His book Alphabestiary (with exegesis by Bruce Meyer) featured at the International Festival of Authors, Toronto. Last year his two-month round-the-world-without-a-cellphone lecture-tour visiting thirteen cities and delivering sixteen lectures culminated with solo exhibition of his zoomorphic calligraphy at an Animal Rights event at the University of Sydney. He is a lapsed vegetarian. Read what LinR participants have said about the Alphabestiary lecture series.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 2
What Can We Learn from Shady Science?

Lecturer: Ashley Thompson

This lecture series will explore some of the most unethical experiments ever seen in science and psychology, including their impact on scientific knowledge and practices. Many of these studies led to the development of current ethical standards for scientists who wish to conduct research. And what have past questionable scientific and psychological studies taught us about human behaviour? We will discover the harmful effects of fear-based learning, conditioning, group psychology and diffusion of responsibility. We will also discuss the importance of early life experiences in promoting healthy physical and psychological development.

  • Days: Mondays, September 9 – October 21 (no class October 14)
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Ashley Thompson is an instructor in the Neuroscience department at Carleton University. She teaches Introduction to Neurological disease and the Honours workshop for fourth year students. Ashley completed her PhD in Neuroscience at Carleton focusing on Parkinson’s disease (PD). Her doctoral research used substances that naturally occur in the brain to alter the environment of the regions known to be vulnerable in PD in order to protect those neurons from degeneration and death. Ashley is also a member of the Society for Neuroscience (Ottawa chapter), a volunteer organization that seeks to promote the study of neuroscience to youth through a variety of outreach initiatives. Ashley is the coordinator of one such event, the Ottawa Regional Brain Bee, a neuroscience trivia competition for high school students that offers a paid summer internship in a neuroscience lab at Carleton as its top prize. Read what LinR participants have said about Ashley Thompson.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 3
Spy Fiction: Classics of the 20th and 21st Centuries – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Stefani Nielson

Spy stories reach back even to ancient times. In North America and Europe, the genre reached mass proportions during the Cold War, when the US-USSR rivalry was at its height and secondary powers tried to influence the balance of power. While political players have since changed, the spy tale has endured! Through classics such as The 39 Steps, Epitaph for a Spy, Our Man in Havana and Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy, we will consider the essential ingredients of the spy story (gadgets, travel, evil villains, reluctant heroes), its cultural relevance, and its future since the so-called “end” of the Cold War.

  • Days: Mondays, September 9 – October 21 (no class October 14)
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 17, Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre (355 Cooper Street)
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 30 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR Lecturer Stefani NielsonLecturer biography: Stefani Nielson studied undergraduate literature and publishing at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, B.C. After working with a Vancouver non-fiction publisher, she subsequently taught writing courses while completing an MA in American literature at Pennsylvania State University, researching for the Ernest Hemingway Collected Letters Project. After moving to Ottawa in 2006, Stefani completed an MA in modern philosophy and cultural issues. Stefani has worked as a freelance editor and writer for local publications. From 2014 to 2016, Stefani lectured for Carleton’s Learning in Retirement program and the University of Ottawa’s Continuing Education program on such topics as travel writing, 20th century American fiction and detective fiction. Stefani currently works with the Government of Canada as a technical writer and training adviser for technology projects. She enjoys films and gardening. Read what LinR participants have said about Stefani Nielson.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 4
Life of Stars

Lecturer: Robert Dick

Everything we know and experience depends on our Sun. But all stars, including our Sun, are born, evolve and eventually die and fade away. This series presents the life cycle of stars from the beginning of the Universe to the present, and into the future. We will use images to punctuate notable periods in a star’s life. We will discuss the science and the observations that give insight into these processes.

  • Days: Tuesdays, September 10 – October 15
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Robert Dick Lecturer biography: Mr. Dick is a Professional Engineer with a B.Eng in Mechanical Engineering and a M.Eng in Aerodynamics. Robert is a life member of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada and is actively involved at the national level in several fields, for which he has been awarded The President’s Medal and Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada. As a mechanical engineer he has taken lead positions on several aerospace programs and satellites. Based on his reputation as a communicator and educator, he was invited by the Canadian Space Agency to be the astronomy instructor for the Canadian Astronauts. He has taught full credit courses on astronomy at Carleton University, the University of Ottawa and Algonquin College. Read what LinR participants have said about Robert Dick.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 5
Baroque Music: More Than Meets the Ear – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Olivier Henchiri

Develop your knowledge and appreciation of Baroque music in this series by the founder of the Ottawa Baroque Consort. Through guided listening, we will explore concepts such as the doctrine of affections, intrinsic emotions of musical keys, counterpoint, imitative writing, ornamentation, and word painting. One lecture will be dedicated to uncovering the abundant and vivid word painting in Vivaldi’s Four Seasons. Historical performance practice will also be discussed and demonstrated in class using a period instrument. The series will give you the tools to not only recognize music from this era instantly, but also to see it—and hear it—in a completely new light.

  • Days: Tuesdays, September 10 – October 15
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Olivier HenchiriLecturer biography: A strong advocate for early music in Ottawa for over fifteen years, Olivier Henchiri founded and directs the Ottawa Baroque Consort, a professional orchestra on period instruments. A master’s recipient from uOttawa and graduate of the Conservatory of Music in Gatineau and the Tafelmusik Institute, Olivier specializes in Baroque music and historical performance practices. He has performed cello in a number of chamber ensembles, orchestras and festivals in Ottawa, Montreal and Toronto. He has written several concert-plays on Baroque-era characters and stories performed with live orchestra, and he frequently delivers masterclasses, workshops, and talks on Baroque music.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 6
Babylon to the Big Bang: The First Billion Miles – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Peter Watson

Astronomy starts with the Babylonians, and in this lecture series, we will see why. Following their legacy, we will explore the Greeks as well as modern ideas of Copernicus, Galileo, and Newton. We will examine the vast variety of new ideas and techniques of the 20th century, and how these developments gave us a far more profound understanding of our solar system. The theme throughout will be our drive to understand how the universe works. The Late Fall 2019 Session lecture series entitled “Babylon to the Big Bang: The Rest of the Journey” will carry on where this one ends. However, the two lecture series are freestanding.

  • Days: Tuesdays, September 10 – October 15
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 17, Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre (355 Cooper Street)
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 30 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Peter WatsonLecturer biography: Peter Watson learned physics and math at Edinburgh and Durham universities, and joined Carleton University in 1974, becoming chair of the Physics Department and then Dean of Science. He has worked at CERN (Switzerland) and Oxford and Edinburgh Universities, and spent two years in Nigeria. In addition to a 40-year research career in theoretical physics, he has taught a wide variety of courses at all levels, many involving innovative teaching methods. Although he retired in June 2008, he has continued to teach, give public lectures and do research. Read what LinR participants have said about Dr. Watson.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 7
The Brain and the Mind: The Neuropsychology of Being Human – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Peter Fried

The prefrontal cortex, the brain region that undergoes the greatest expansion both in evolution and individual maturation, controls the “essence” of our humanity: planning, anticipation, flexibility in thinking processes, language expression, understanding jokes, social interactions, inhibitions and our conscience. This lecture series will address behaviours in the growing child and adolescent that reveal the progressive development and functioning of the prefrontal cortex, as well as its role in risk taking, jazz and autism. It will include some neuroanatomy, and cover the impact of some prenatal drugs (including marihuana) upon the development of this region. Class participation and clinical findings will also be used to explore this CEO of the brain.

  • Days: Wednesdays, September 11 – October 16
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Peter FriedLecturer biography: Peter Fried is a Distinguished Research Professor and Professor Emeritus of Carleton University’s Psychology department. His more than three decades of teaching includes introductory psychology, neuropsychology, perception and sensation, and physiological psychology. He has also taught in the Learning in Retirement series for several years and, recently, has lectured on cruise ships. He is the director of an investigation, initiated in 1978, of the neurobehavioral consequences of marihuana use during pregnancy upon offspring. The findings are the most widely cited in the marihuana-pregnancy scientific literature and have resulted in numerous awards and invitations to lecture around the world. He has worked with numerous international neuropsychologists and will couple this collaboration with his own research and teaching experience in the Learning in Retirement program.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 8
Finance Matters: Capital, Cryptocurrencies, and Much More

Lecturer: Dr. Monia Mazigh

What do you know about economic modelling, derivatives, or Bitcoin? This lecture series is designed to give participants a basic knowledge in finance, while being exposed to complex and new topics in the field. (It isn’t about how to create wealth or become a successful investor, though your new knowledge may give you more confidence to pursue those goals.) We will address economic theories, financial markets, capital, financial instruments, the financialization of the economy, and cryptocurrencies. This isn’t a class about number crunching and hard graphics to decipher. No economic or mathematical background is required.

  • Days: Wednesdays, September 11 – October 16
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Monia MazighLecturer biography: Monia Mazigh is an academic, author and human rights advocate. She was the former National Coordinator of the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group. Mazigh was born and raised in Tunisia and immigrated to Canada in 1991. She was catapulted onto the public stage in 2002 when her husband, Maher Arar, was deported to Syria where he was tortured and held without charge for over a year. She campaigned tirelessly for his release. Mazigh holds a PhD in finance from McGill University. In 2008, she published a memoir about her pursuit of justice, Hope and Despair, shortlisted for the Ottawa Book Award. Her first novel, Mirrors and Mirages (2014), was short listed for the Book Trillium Award and for the Ottawa Book Award. Her 2017 novel, Hope Has Two Daughters, was published by Anansi House. She writes in her blog at moniamazigh.com.

Read what LinR participants have said about Dr. Monia Mazigh’s “History of Financial Crises” series.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 9
A Brief History of Ancient Greece – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Marcel Jesenský

Ancient Greece is a fascinating success story of a small population that created one of the world’s most remarkable cultures. It is known for its thinkers and philosophers, the Olympics, the conquests of Alexander the Great, the building of the Parthenon at Athens and the temple of Zeus at Olympia. Its literary accomplishments include the Homeric epics (The Iliad and the Odyssey), the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, and the comedies of Aristophanes. Ancient Greece left a rich record of achievements in art, literature, politics, philosophy, mathematics, science, and war, and its legacy is still alive. This series traces this remarkable chapter of them world’s history.

  • Days: Thursdays, September 12 – October 17
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lectuer Dr. Marcel JesenskýLecturer biography: Dr. Marcel Jesenský is a specialist on the United Nations, international relations, diplomacy and European history. He holds a PhD in History (University of Ottawa). His first book The Slovak-Polish Border, 1918-1947 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014) chronicles the legacy of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. His latest book The United Nations under Ban Ki-moon: Give Diplomacy a Chance (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019) narrates the story of the United Nations under Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon from 2007–2016. Dr. Jesenský teaches at the University of Ottawa and Carleton University. His current research focuses on the history of the United Nations after 1945. Read what LinR participants have said about Dr. Jesenský.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 10
The Story of Rock and Roll: 1951-1966 – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Keith McCuaig

This series celebrates the explosion of creativity in American and British popular music, using lectures, audio and video examples, and live demonstrations. We will explore the birth of rock and roll through to the British Invasion. Styles to be discussed include rockabilly, Brill Building pop, surf rock, folk, and more. We will also examine the social and historical context of this music, including a growing youth culture and changing race relations. From Elvis Presley and Bob Dylan, to the Beatles and the Rolling Stones, the music of the 1950s and early 1960s exerted a cultural influence that lives on to the present. See also Keith’s Late Fall lecture series, “Rock in the Late 1960s and Beyond”.

  • Days: Thursdays, September 12 – October 17
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 17, Dominion Chalmers Centre (355 Cooper Street)
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 30 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Keith McCuaigLecturer biography: With an MA in Music and Culture, and over 20 years’ experience as a musician, Keith McCuaig is dedicated to all things music and art. He loves exploring the histories of popular music, especially the interconnectedness of genres, and the socio-cultural significance of music. Keith has extensive experience in researching, writing and teaching a variety of music-related topics; he’s taught musicology courses through Carleton University and the University of Ottawa, and presented at international musicology conferences. From performing, writing, recording, and producing, to lecturing, giving music lessons, and working with community music programs (such as Ottawa Bluesfest’s Blues in the Schools and Be in the Band), Keith’s life and passion is music. Read what LinR participants have said about Keith McCuaig.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 11
Jane Austen’s England – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN  

Lecturer: Dr. Kerry Abel

The world of the English gentry that Jane Austen so brilliantly and delightfully depicted has fascinated generations of readers. In this series, we will look at the history behind the fiction. How have historians thought about the world of the “Long Eighteenth Century” (1750-1850) in England? How have Austen’s novels shaped our perceptions? What did she omit? And how do the many film adaptations of her work contribute to our ideas? No knowledge of Austen’s work is necessary. The lectures and discussions in this series will approach the subject from the viewpoint of an historian, not that of a literary specialist.

  • Days: Thursdays, September 12 – October 17
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Kerry Abel Lecturer biography: Kerry Abel is a retired member of the Carleton University department of History, where for many years, she taught courses in Canadian and Indigenous history with a particular emphasis on the north. Her publications include the prize-winning book Changing Places: History, Community, and Identity in Northeastern Ontario. In recent years, she has turned to the study of quite a different community and has been researching the biography of an Englishwoman who lived through much of the “Long Eighteenth Century” in a social world very like Jane Austen’s.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 12
Quantum Weirdness for Beginners – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Andrew Robinson

The word “quantum” is often used to describe scientific phenomena, or indeed, a significant advance in a certain field. Despite its profound conceptual and philosophical challenges to physicists, we can use quantum physics in a wide variety of everyday applications. In this lecture series, I will discuss the basics of what “quantum phenomena” are, and what they are not, and show how we experience quantum phenomena in a variety of everyday life situations. This will be a non-mathematical discussion of quantum phenomena and quantum mechanics. No knowledge of physics or mathematics is required.

  • Days: Fridays, September 13 – October 18
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Andrew RobinsonLecturer biography: Dr. Andrew Robinson is a Contract Instructor in the Physics Department at Carleton University. He has degrees in Chemical Physics and Physical Chemistry from Bristol University and Bath University. He has worked as a professional scientist in Germany and the UK, and moved to Canada in 2000. After working at the University of Saskatchewan, he moved to Ottawa in 2010. His current research interest is the teaching of Physics at the post-secondary level, and he uses innovative technology and pedagogical methods in his classes. He has won Faculty of Science Teaching Awards in 2012, 2014, and 2017.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 13
Iran’s Foreign Policy After 2015: Politics of Normalizers and Conservatives
Lecturer: Dr. Farhad Rezaei

How well do you understand Iran’s global relationships since the nuclear agreement of 2015? This lecture series examines Iran’s relations with Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Syria, and Turkey, as well as its foreign policy regarding the United States, Russia, and the European Union. We will also address the influence of terrorism, war in Syria, relations with Hezbollah and Hamas, and conflict with Israel. Throughout we will examine how Iran’s foreign policy has been shaped by two important factions in its political establishment: normalizers who want to integrate Iran into the community of nations, and their hardliner opposing forces, who don’t want changes in Iran’s international posture.

  • Days: Fridays, September 13 – October 18
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Farhad RezaeiLecturer biography: Dr. Farhad Rezaei is an Ottawa-based researcher of Iran’s foreign policy. He is the author of four books, and numerous articles in refereed journals and chapters on a broad range of topics including Iran’s foreign policy, Iran’s nuclear program, nuclear intelligence within the framework of counterproliferation, and nuclear and radiological terrorism. His writings have appeared in Harvard-Iran Matters, the National Interest, Atlantic Council, Middle East Journal, Middle East Policy, British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies, Journal of International Affairs, Insight Turkey, Korean Journal of Defense Analysis, and Asian Affairs among others.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Writing Workshops

We all have a story to tell. However, knowing where to begin can become so overwhelming that we put off writing the story at all. In these workshops you are invited to re-collect, record and share the stories from your life through a specific lens. Bring your own writing instruments to a safe environment where you will begin your collection of life-stories.

Writing Workshop 1
Writing the Stories of My Life: Remembering My Mother – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

How do we capture our mother in a single story and is that even possible? What are the stories we want to remember, share and honour? We will work at isolating the small, rare and authentic stories that most effectively show who she was/is. How might writing about our mothers give us a glimpse into who we are, who we were and who we have become? Please prepare by collecting photographs and “artifacts” that you associate with your mother.

  • Days: Thursdays, September 12 – October 17
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 14, Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre (355 Cooper Street)
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $200.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Writing workshop outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Anna RuminLecturer biography: Dr. Anna Rumin is a native Montrealer whose identity has been shaped by the political landscape of her home province, her Russian roots, a passion for life-long learning that has been woven both formally in academia and informally through travel, voracious reading and writing, and a love for the stories hidden in our natural world. Her interest in narrative inquiry stems from her belief that not only do we all have a story to tell, but that our stories help us to better understand who we were, who we are and who we are becoming. She has now designed nine memoir-based writing courses that invite participants to think of themselves as the narrators of their life as seen and written through a particular lens. Regardless of who she is working with, Anna is committed to supporting those she leads, by providing them with opportunities to set and meet their goals. In her spare time Anna writes short fiction and has been the recipient of numerous awards.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Writing Workshop 2
Writing the Stories of My Life: Remembering Through Space and Time – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

We will explore and capture stories about the spaces and places that have played an important role in your life. What are your memorable journeys, big and small? What does it mean “to travel” and how do we use travel as memoir writing as opposed to “travel writing”? How does “exploration” give us a glimpse into who we were and who we have become?

  • Days: Thursdays, September 12 – October 17
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 14, Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre (355 Cooper Street)
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $200.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Writing workshop outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Anna RuminLecturer biography: Dr. Anna Rumin is a native Montrealer whose identity has been shaped by the political landscape of her home province, her Russian roots, a passion for life-long learning that has been woven both formally in academia and informally through travel, voracious reading and writing, and a love for the stories hidden in our natural world. Her interest in narrative inquiry stems from her belief that not only do we all have a story to tell, but that our stories help us to better understand who we were, who we are and who we are becoming. She has now designed nine memoir-based writing courses that invite participants to think of themselves as the narrators of their life as seen and written through a particular lens. Regardless of who she is working with, Anna is committed to supporting those she leads, by providing them with opportunities to set and meet their goals. In her spare time Anna writes short fiction and has been the recipient of numerous awards.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Language Workshops

Language Workshop 1
Italian for Travellers Level I, Part II
Lecturer: Carla Bonora

Continuing where Italian for Travellers Level I finished, we will cover additional basic interactions, enabling participants to feel comfortable while communicating during a trip to Italy or in an Italian environment. We will cover how to introduce ourselves and ask basic questions about others, as well as to speak about hobbies, dates and time, daily life and family members. A field trip will familiarize participants with Italian food products in an Italian shop (different from the Level I field trip). A/V materials about Italian culture and music, as well as holidays and how to celebrate them will also be explored

  • Days: Mondays & Wednesdays, September 9 – October 7
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 14, Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre (355 Cooper Street)
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $260.00 (HST included)
    • (Fee includes printed materials)
  • Enrollment capacity: 14 participants
  • Language workshop outline
  • Note: Last class will be a field trip to an Italian food shop
  • Pre-requisite: Italian for Travellers Level I

Picture of LinR lecturer Carla BonoraLecturer biography: A native of Naples, Italy, Carla Bonora has a Masters in History and Philosophy from the University of Naples. She is a journalist and has worked at the European Commission in Brussels, as well as for “Il Mattino”, the main newspaper of Naples. She also worked as an Ottawa correspondent for the Italian Canadian newspaper “Il Corriere Canadese”. She is an experienced teacher, having worked both in Naples and here as an Italian teacher. She has taught Italian Language and Culture at “Retraite en Action” in Ottawa since 2014. She is a member of the Board of Ottawa’s “Dante Alighieri Society”, and President of the Canadian Association “Friends of the Certosa of Capri”. Carla is a passionate traveller and she loves to cook Italian food.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Language Workshop 2
Italian for Travellers Level I – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Carla Bonora

This workshop will provide participants with the skills to feel comfortable while communicating during a trip to Italy or in an Italian environment. This workshop will teach you how to introduce yourself, make hotel reservations, ask for directions, make a phone call, write an email, order in a restaurant, and face emergency situations. One field trip will familiarize participants with Italian food products in an Italian shop. Audiovisual materials about Italian culture, music, and daily life will also be a part of the workshop. Vi aspettiamo!

  • Days: Tuesdays & Fridays, September 10 – October 8
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 342, St. Patrick’s Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $260.00 (HST included)
    • (Fee includes printed materials)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Language workshop outline
  • Note: Last class will be a field trip to an Italian food shop

Picture of LinR lecturer Carla BonoraLecturer biography: A native of Naples, Italy, Carla Bonora has a Masters in History and Philosophy from the University of Naples. She is a journalist and has worked at the European Commission in Brussels, as well as for “Il Mattino”, the main newspaper of Naples. She also worked as an Ottawa correspondent for the Italian Canadian newspaper “Il Corriere Canadese”. She is an experienced teacher, having worked both in Naples and here as an Italian teacher. She has taught Italian Language and Culture at “Retraite en Action” in Ottawa since 2014. She is a member of the Board of Ottawa’s “Dante Alighieri Society”, and President of the Canadian Association “Friends of the Certosa of Capri”. Carla is a passionate traveller and she loves to cook Italian food.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Language Workshop 3
Spanish for Travellers Level I – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Ioana Dimitriu

This introductory Spanish workshop aims to provide participants with the grammatical and lexical elements that are essential for basic communication. Conversation topics will focus on travel and will include asking for directions, talking about the weather and the schedule, expressing food and accommodation preferences, describing places and tourist attractions, shopping for souvenirs, expressing medical concerns, and making an emergency call. Audiovisual materials will include cultural components related to different parts of the Spanish-speaking world. The workshop is practical for people who wish to be able to communicate in Spanish while travelling; it is also enjoyable for all armchair travellers.

  • Days: Tuesdays & Thursdays, September 5 – October 10
    • No class September 24 and 26
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 342, St. Patrick’s Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $250.00 (HST included)
    • (Fee includes printed materials)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Language workshop outline

Picture of LinR lectuer Dr. Ioana DimitiruLecturer biography: Ioana Dimitriu has been developing and teaching Spanish for Travellers workshops at Levels I, II and III, in the Learning in Retirement Program since 2017. Ioana worked as an Assistant to the Ambassador of Argentina to Canada, and as a Spanish Sessional Lecturer at the University of Ottawa (2001-2008). She has recently been appointed a full-time Spanish Instructor at the School of Linguistics and Language Studies at Carleton University, where she has been working since 2010. Ioana holds a Ph.D. in Spanish (Comparative Literature) and an M.A. in Spanish (Applied Linguistics) from the University of Ottawa (2010; 2002). Her current research interests are in the area of testimonial writings, with a focus on memoirs of former political prisoners of totalitarian regimes in Latin-America and in Eastern Europe. In this context, Ioana is examining the role of the humanities and the arts in one’s upbringing, and specifically at how a significant background in languages, literatures, film, history, theology, and visual arts, nourishes and supports the human person in times of crisis. Ioana’s personal interests include exploring other cultures through literature, film and travel, and kayaking on Loon Lake in South-Eastern Ontario.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

You can view our Late Fall 2019 Session offerings here. We also offer a wide variety of Single Lecture Presentations (two hours each).