Fall 2017 Evening Lectures

During the month of October, the Learning in Retirement program will feature seven one-time, evening lectures.

To view a PDF version of Learning in Retirement’s Fall 2017 Evening Lectures brochure, please click here.

The Bookstand and the Book
How Nutrition Changes the Aging Brain – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
How Nutrition Changes the Aging Brain – Section II
New Orleans and the Roots of Jazz
Can Protesting Stop Trump?
An Introduction to Neural Networks
From Delta Blues to Memphis Rock ‘n’ Roll
The Art of War: The Fate of Art Looted in World War II – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Evening Lecture 1
The Bookstand and the Book

Lecturer: H. Masud Taj

Traditional timber book stands unfold to support the Quran; the meaning is in the making. Such constructions construe knowledge: a persistence of pattern across centuries of craftsmanship that intersect material and memory, geography and geometry, cosmogenesis and cultures. This lecture will probe the reciprocal relationship between the bookstand and the book as it journeys (rihlata) the global, the urban, the architectural, via the speaker’s folding interpretations, to the unfolding joinery (rahla) held in the hand.

  • Date: Tuesday, October 3rd, 2017
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building

Lecture, visual presentation, and film clips

Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
Enrollment capacity: 40 participants

Lecturer biography: H Masud Taj, award winning Adjunct Professor of Architecture at Carleton University and Visiting Fellow at Aligarh Muslim University, India, was mentored by the leading exponent of Islamic Architecture, Hassan Fathy, in Egypt. He delivered Keynote at the International Conference of Islamic Art and Architecture. Engaging the Other (Macmillan) featured his research in Andalusia, Spain that was showcased by the Faculty of Public Affairs in 2015 and at Author Meets Readers event at the Ottawa International Writers Festival in 2016. His books are archived in University’s Special Collections and one has been inducted in the Library of Parliament.

Evening Lecture 2
How Nutrition Changes the Aging Brain – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Nafisa Jadavji

This lecture will examine the role of vitamins and nutrients on neurological function during aging. An introduction to basic neurology will be covered at the beginning of the lecture. There will be a specific focus on neurology and how vitamins and nutrients affect normal aging and neurodegenerative disease processes in the brain. Topics covered throughout the lecture will include how nutrient and vitamin deficiencies affect Alzheimer’s disease, mild cognitive impairment, vascular cognitive impairment, stroke, as well as the impact of vitamin supplementation on brain function.

  • Date: Wednesday, October 4th, 2017
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building

Lecture, discussion, visual presentation, and film clips

Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Dr. Nafisa M. Jadavji is a Neuroscientist. Currently, she is postdoctoral fellow researcher and instructor at Carleton University and the University of Ottawa, in Ottawa, Canada. She completed her doctoral training at McGill University in Montréal, Canada and postdoctoral training at the Charité Medical University in Berlin, Germany. Her post-doctoral research focuses on understanding how dietary and genetic deficiencies in one carbon metabolism, specifically, folate metabolism, affects neurological function over the lifespan using a mouse model. Her research has been published in Behavioural Brain Research, Biochemical Journal, Neuroendocrinology, Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, Human Molecular Genetics, European Journal of Neuroscience, Journal of Pediatric Reviews, Neural Regeneration Research, Environmental Epigenetics, and Neuroscience. Dr. Jadavji has been funded by the Federation of European Neuroscience Society (Europe), NeuroWIND (Germany), Canadian Association for Neuroscience, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, National Science & Engineering Research Council (Canada), International Brain Research Organization, Parkinson’s disease Foundation (US), Burroughs Wellcome Fund (US) and Fonds de la recherché en santé Québec (Canada). She is a regular reviewer for the Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, Neurotoxicity Research, Journal of Molecular Medicine and Neuroscience. Currently, Dr. Jadavji is an Editorial member for Updates in Nutritional Disorders and Therapy and JSM Nutritional Disorders Journals. She is also the Chair of the Board of Directors for the Journal of Young Investigators (JYI).

NEW! How Nutrition Changes the Aging Brain – Section II

Lecturer: Dr. Nafisa Jadavji

This lecture will examine the role of vitamins and nutrients on neurological function during aging. An introduction to basic neurology will be covered at the beginning of the lecture. There will be a specific focus on neurology and how vitamins and nutrients affect normal aging and neurodegenerative disease processes in the brain. Topics covered throughout the lecture will include how nutrient and vitamin deficiencies affect Alzheimer’s disease, mild cognitive impairment, vascular cognitive impairment, stroke, as well as the impact of vitamin supplementation on brain function.

  • Date: Thursday, October 5th, 2017
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building

Lecture, discussion, visual presentation, and film clips

Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
PowerPoint Presentation

Lecturer biography: Dr. Nafisa M. Jadavji is a Neuroscientist. Currently, she is postdoctoral fellow researcher and instructor at Carleton University and the University of Ottawa, in Ottawa, Canada. She completed her doctoral training at McGill University in Montréal, Canada and postdoctoral training at the Charité Medical University in Berlin, Germany. Her post-doctoral research focuses on understanding how dietary and genetic deficiencies in one carbon metabolism, specifically, folate metabolism, affects neurological function over the lifespan using a mouse model. Her research has been published in Behavioural Brain Research, Biochemical Journal, Neuroendocrinology, Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, Human Molecular Genetics, European Journal of Neuroscience, Journal of Pediatric Reviews, Neural Regeneration Research, Environmental Epigenetics, and Neuroscience. Dr. Jadavji has been funded by the Federation of European Neuroscience Society (Europe), NeuroWIND (Germany), Canadian Association for Neuroscience, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, National Science & Engineering Research Council (Canada), International Brain Research Organization, Parkinson’s disease Foundation (US), Burroughs Wellcome Fund (US) and Fonds de la recherché en santé Québec (Canada). She is a regular reviewer for the Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, Neurotoxicity Research, Journal of Molecular Medicine and Neuroscience. Currently, Dr. Jadavji is an Editorial member for Updates in Nutritional Disorders and Therapy and JSM Nutritional Disorders Journals. She is also the Chair of the Board of Directors for the Journal of Young Investigators (JYI).

Evening Lecture 3
New Orleans and the Roots of Jazz

Lecturer: Keith McCuaig

The Crescent City has been a melting pot of culture since at least the early 1800s. With an intermingling of diverse musical styles, including African, European, Caribbean, and others, New Orleans developed its distinct character. During the days of slavery in the United States, this was also one of the few cities where African Americans were able to express themselves artistically. By the early 1900s, this potent mix of cultures led to the birth of jazz.

  • Date: Tuesday, October 10th, 2017
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building

Lecture, visual presentation, and film clips

Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: With an M.A. in Music and Culture, and more than twenty years of experience as a musician, Keith McCuaig is a specialist in all things music and art. He loves exploring the histories of popular music, especially the interconnectedness of genres, and looking at the socio-cultural significance of music. Keith has extensive experience in researching, writing and teaching a variety of musicological topics; he has delivered guest lectures at two universities, presented at multiple international musicology conferences, and taught musicology courses through Carleton University and the University of Ottawa. From performing, writing, recording, and producing, to lecturing, giving music lessons, and working with community music programs such as Ottawa Bluesfest’s Blues in the Schools and Be in the Band, Keith’s life and passion is music.

Evening Lecture 4
Can Protesting Stop Trump?

Lecturer: Dr. Brian McDougall

Millions of people in the US, Canada, and elsewhere have been horrified by the election of Trump, demonstrating their opposition to his views and policies by protesting. Others, who also regard Trump as a threat, have refrained from such actions, in part because of questions about the efficacy of protests. Are protests the best way to ‘stop Trump’? Do they actually work? Are anti-Trump protests likely to become even larger? Using examples drawn from various countries and historical periods, this lecture will provide some of the intellectual tools and historical insights required to answer such questions.

  • Date: Wednesday, October 11th, 2017
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building

Lecture and visual presentation

Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Brian McDougall is a former university teacher, retired public servant, and life-long socialist and trade union activist in Ottawa. He draws upon his academic training (Doctorate in Sociology, Masters in Canadian Studies), his extensive experience in a variety of social movements (e.g., Indigenous rights, anti-war, anti-racism, pro-choice, gay rights, etc.) and his recent activity as the owner of a historical walking tour business (Peoples’ History Walking Tours) to talk about historical and political issues that are rarely discussed. Often provocative in his views, Brian’s lectures, tours and courses help people to see and think about their world in novel ways.

Evening Lecture 5
An Introduction to Neural Networks

Lecturer: Dr. Kevin Cheung

Neural networks are all the rage these days in artificial intelligence. They are used to power many applications such as spam filtering, recognizing faces, playing board and card games, natural language processing, making connections on social networks, and driving cars. This lecture will present a history of neural networks, their place in artificial intelligence, the mathematical concepts involved in their construction, examples of success, and some current developments in the battle for supremacy in the space.

  • Date: Thursday, October 12th, 2017
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building

Lecture and visual presentation

Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Kevin Cheung has been a faculty member of the School of Mathematics and Statistics at Carleton University since 2005. After completing his PhD. at the University of Waterloo in 2003, he spent two years at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) Postdoctoral Fellow. In addition to discrete optimization, his current academic interests include designing and developing teaching tools and exploiting technology to help students attain mastery.

Evening Lecture 6
From Delta Blues to Memphis Rock ‘n’ Roll

Lecturer: Keith McCuaig

Blues music is a foundational genre in American popular music and its influence cannot be overstated. Although the roots of the blues can be traced to several southern regions, the Mississippi Delta is perhaps the most significant area in terms of the blues’ development. Blues also had a direct impact on rock ‘n’ roll, and this can clearly be seen in the music of 1950’s Memphis, Tennessee. This city is arguably the birthplace of rock ‘n’ roll, largely due to the records made by Sam Phillips at Sun Studios.

  • Date: Tuesday, October 17th, 2017
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building

Lecture, visual presentation, and film clips

Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: With an M.A. in Music and Culture, and more than twenty years of experience as a musician, Keith McCuaig is a specialist in all things music and art. He loves exploring the histories of popular music, especially the interconnectedness of genres, and looking at the socio-cultural significance of music. Keith has extensive experience in researching, writing and teaching a variety of musicological topics; he has delivered guest lectures at two universities, presented at multiple international musicology conferences, and taught musicology courses through Carleton University and the University of Ottawa. From performing, writing, recording, and producing, to lecturing, giving music lessons, and working with community music programs such as Ottawa Bluesfest’s Blues in the Schools and Be in the Band, Keith’s life and passion is music.

Evening Lecture 7
The Art of War: The Fate of Art Looted in World War II

Lecturer: David Walden

In the 1930s, the Nazi Government of Germany began to systematically confiscate works of art from the collections of private citizens and art galleries, first in Germany and later in countries occupied by its armies. As World War II drew to a close, the Allied forces advanced on Germany from the West, while the army of the Soviet Union moved in from the East. Both armies soon discovered large caches of looted art, yet deciding what to do with hundreds of thousands of works of art could not have been more different: while the Allied armies sought to return the art to its rightful owners, the Soviet armies secreted it away and kept it as war reparations. The last 25 years have seen art, previously thought lost, reappear, increased public awareness of what took place, and refusals by governments to restitute looted art. This lecture examines the looting of art during the Nazi regime, the different approaches to its return after the war, and the continuing discoveries of looted art. It will also highlight successful cases of post-war recovery and return, as well as very public refusals to do so.

  • Date: Thursday, October 19th, 2017
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building

Lecture and visual presentation

Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: David Walden holds a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in History and Political Science and a Master of Arts in Canadian Studies, both from Carleton University. He has over 30 years’ experience working with UNESCO, culminating in his appointment as Secretary-General of the Canadian Commission for UNESCO in 1999. David’s extensive international involvement includes chairing the UNESCO Intergovernmental Committee for Promoting the Return of Cultural Property to its Countries of Origin or its Restitution in Case of Illicit Appropriation; the Executive Board and General Conference of UNESCO; the International Network on Cultural Policy; and the UN Economic Commission for Europe Meeting on Sustainable Development. A member of the Executive Management Committee of the Canada Council for the Arts from 1999 until his retirement in 2013, David now works as a consultant in international organizations and governance. Since 2013 he has also been a lecturer in cultural affairs and cultural policy at Carleton University, the University of Ottawa, and Brock University. David currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Perley Rideau Veterans’ Health Centre (Ottawa) where he is the Chair of the Stakeholder and Community Relations Committee.