Fall 2017 Session II (October 30 – December 8)

The Fall 2017 Session II will run over six weeks and will offer the following thirteen lecture series and one language series.

To view a PDF version of Learning in Retirement’s Fall 2017 Session II brochure, please click here.

Israel/Palestine: Can it Ever be Solved? – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Solidarity Forever: The Labour Movement Through Song
Women and Islam – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
France in the Era of Louis XIV – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Writing Stories From My Life – WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
The Art of Memoir and Travel Writing – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Impressionism and Beyond (Daytime) – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Impressionism and Beyond Section II (Daytime) – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
African American Music of the 1940s – 1970s: Blues, R&B, Soul, and Funk
From Longhouse to Lumber to Legislation: An Anecdotal History of Ottawa – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
The Ottoman Empire: From Expanding Power to the Sick Man of Europe – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
The Balkans: Powder Keg of Europe – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Modern Korean History: 1876-Present – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
A Canadian Perspective on Musical Theatre
Spanish Conversation for Travellers II – LANGUAGE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecture Series 1
Israel/Palestine: Can it Ever be Solved? – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Peter Larson

Over the last 70 years, the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians has cost thousands of lives and imposed misery on many innocent people. To many Canadians the issue appears unsolvable. It is difficult to have a calm discussion about it, as emotions are high on all sides. This lecture series will examine the Israeli and Palestinian narratives and compare them to the historical record and current reality. We will also look at whether Canada’s current policies are likely to help bring about a resolution.

Lectures, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Mondays, October 30th – December 4th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Peter Larson is the Chair of Canada Talks Israel Palestine, (CTIP) a Canadian human rights organization focusing on the Middle East. His professional career included periods at the Public Policy Forum, the Conference Board of Canada, Le Droit, and as a consultant to labour unions and federal government departments and agencies. For the last 10 years, he has taken a particular interest in human rights issues in the Middle East, visiting Israel, Lebanon, Iran, Jordan, Egypt, and the occupied Palestinian territories of the West Bank and Gaza. He has also led many trips to Israel/Palestine for Canadians interested in gaining a deeper understanding of the complex Israel/Palestine issue. He is a frequent lecturer for church and labour groups, retiree associations, and service clubs. His presentations are appreciated for being fact-based and balanced. He is also the principal author of a weekly series of articles on the Middle East to be found at CanadaTalksIsraelPalestine.ca.    

Lecture Series 2
Solidarity Forever: The Labour Movement Through Song

Lecturer: Dr. Stephen Richer

The aim of this lecture series is to examine a selection of key songs and singer/song-writers associated with the development of the labour movement in North America. Among the musicians to be discussed are Joe Hill, Ralph Chaplin, Florence Reece, Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, and Rita MacNeil. Our focus will be on how the biographies of such key personalities interact with social context to produce protest songs related to labour issues.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips, and optional collective singing

  • Days: Mondays, October 30th – December 4th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Dr. Stephen Richer is a retired Professor Emeritus of Sociology and former Chair of the Sociology and Anthropology Department at Carleton University. He has published seven books and many articles, mostly on education and Canadian society. After retirement, he took on several projects, including Education Director on an around-the-world cruise, teaching social research to Cree people on James Bay, leading sing-alongs for Alzheimer’s patients, and producing fundraising shows. He has been a folk/protest singer since he was eighteen and recently led protest singing against the CANSEC arms show and at rallies against the commercial development of Lansdowne Park.

Lecture Series 3
Women and Islam – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Monia Mazigh

This lecture series is an introduction to contemporary issues related to women in Islam. Through a broad range of fiction and non-fiction books, articles, and videos, written by predominantly Muslim authors, the focus will be on historical, social, media, and political representations of Muslim women. We will avoid the trap of easy media representation or sensationalism centered on the orientalist discourse of passive Muslim women in need to be saved. Instead, a more nuanced and multidimensional approach to tackle some of the issues affecting Muslim women will be explored. We will examine Women and Islam not as a homogeneous entity but rather the heterogeneity of “Women” and of “Islam.” Participants will be introduced to several fiction and non-fiction works by some of the most known contemporary Muslim women writers. Characters of some of these literary works will be studied under the light of common stereotypes. Issues such as women’s role in Islam, veiling, polygamy, Islamic traditions, as well as Islamic feminism will be discussed.

Lectures and discussions

  • Days: Tuesdays, October 31st – December 5th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Dr. Monia Mazigh was born and raised in Tunisia and immigrated to Canada in 1991. She speaks Arabic, French, and English fluently and holds a Ph.D. in finance from McGill University. Dr. Mazigh has worked at the University of Ottawa and taught Finance at Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops, British Columbia. In 2004, she ran in the federal election as a candidate for the NDP, gaining the most votes for her riding in the history of the NDP. Dr. Mazigh was catapulted onto the public stage in 2002 when her husband, Maher Arar, was deported to Syria where he was tortured and held without charge for over a year. During that time, Dr. Mazigh campaigned vigorously for her husband’s release and later fought to re-establish his reputation and sought reparations. In January 2007, after a lengthy inquiry, her husband finally received an apology from the Canadian Government.

She has authored a book called Hope and Despair which documents her ordeal after her husband was arrested and how she campaigned to clear his name. Dr. Mazigh has written many articles published in the Globe and Mail, the Toronto Star, the Ottawa Citizen, Le Devoir, and other newspapers. In 2011, Dr. Mazigh published a novel in French, Miroirs et Mirages, stories of four Muslim women living in Canada. Miroirs et Mirages was shortlisted for the prestigious Ontario Trillium award, for the Ottawa Book Award, and for the Christine Dimitriu-Van- Saanen Award of the Salon du Livre de Toronto. In the summer of 2014, Mirrors and Mirages was published in English by Anansi House. Dr. Mazigh wrote a second novel about the events of the Arab Spring. Hope has Two Daughters, a story of revolutions and political awakening, was published in English in 2017 by Anansi House. Dr. Mazigh presently lives in Ottawa with her husband and two children.

Lecture Series 4
France in the Era of Louis XIV – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Michael Dawson

September 1st, 2015 marked the 300th anniversary of the death of Louis XIV, the Sun King. Louis reigned from 1643 to 1715, one of the longest reigns in European history. Louis’ personal reign (from 1661) was famously characterized as the prototype of “absolute monarchy.” At its end, however, medieval legacies and the compromises of his reign and those of his predecessors still shaped the French state. The lectures will explore themes of royal governance, culture and life at court, foreign policy and war, religious issues and revolt, and crime and punishment, through carefully selected representative individuals and events.

Lectures, discussions, and visual presentations

  • Days: Tuesdays, October 31st – December 5th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Michael Dawson received his PhD. in Early Modern European History from the University of Toronto,  specializing in seventeenth century France, in particular administrative and social issues. He has taught at the University of Toronto, Carleton University (Political Science Department), and at the graduate level at the Joseph Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. He is a retired Canadian Foreign Service Officer, with postings in New Delhi, India, Moscow, U.S.S.R., the Canadian Embassy in Washington, and at NORAD Headquarters in Colorado Springs where he was Canadian Political Advisor to the Commander of NORAD and US Northern Command from 2010 to 2014.

Lecture Series 5
Writing Stories From My Life – WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

“We write to taste life twice: once in the moment and once in retrospection” (Anaïs Nin). We all have a story to tell. Often we think of a life story or memoir as a chronology of events. However, knowing where to begin can become so overwhelming that we put off writing the story at all. This is an invitation to re-collect, record, and share the stories from your life. Please bring your own writing instruments to a safe environment where you will experiment with writing strategies using prompts, share your writing with others, and begin your collection of life-stories. Commitment: Six weeks is a very short time! Participants are encouraged to commit to writing five times a week for a minimum of fifteen minutes – prompts will be given. The more you write the more comfortable you will become as a writer; think of this as a “get fit” program. And of course, the more you write about your own life, the stories from your life, the more you will remember. Please choose one piece that you will share with the group at the beginning of class.

Writing Workshop

  • Days: Tuesdays, October 31st – December 5th
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $195.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Dr. Anna Rumin is a native Montrealer, whose identity has been in part shaped by the political landscape of her home province, her Russian roots, a passion for life-long learning that has been woven both formally in educational institutions and informally through travel, voracious reading, the belief that each person has a unique story to tell, and a near obsession with the outdoors, be it in the forest, on a lake or a mountain. Regardless of who she is working with, Anna is committed to supporting those she leads in providing them with opportunities to set and meet their goals. Her guiding questions in both her professional and personal life are: “why am I doing what I am doing and how is that practice supported through research, experience, an ethic of caring, and wisdom?” Having moved to Ottawa in the fall of 2014, Anna continues to look for ways in which she can make a meaningful contribution to the community using the skills she has acquired in the journey that is her life.

Lecture Series 6
The Art of Memoir and Travel Writing – WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Laurie Gough

Our lives are interlaced with stories: intriguing, fascinating, funny, tumultuous, sad, extraordinary, heartfelt, and unique to each of us. This workshop offers you tools and insights from the master memoirists, as well as the instructor’s own experience writing three memoirs, to help transform the stories of your life into a literary work. Memoir writing isn’t writing your whole life. It is writing stories from life, from any time of your life – any story you feel is worth telling. Through discussions of specific topics about memoir and travel writing, and in-class exercises that are fun and thought-provoking, you’ll learn how to craft your stories into inspiring narratives.

Writing Workshop

  • Days: Tuesdays, October 31st – December 5th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $195.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Laurie Gough is a journalist and award-winning author of three memoirs: the newly-released, Stolen Child: A Mother’s Journey to Rescue Her Son from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (Dundurn); Kiss the Sunset Pig: An American Road Trip with Exotic Detours (Penguin); and Kite Strings of the Southern Cross: A Woman’s Travel Odyssey (Random House), shortlisted for the Thomas Cook Travel Book Award in the U.K., and silver medal winner of ForeWord Magazine’s Travel Book of the Year in the U.S. Over twenty of her stories have been anthologized in literary travel books. She has been a regular contributor to The Globe and Mail, and has written for The Guardian, The L.A. Times, Maclean’s, The Walrus, USA Today, salon.com, Huffington Post, The National Post, Canadian Geographic, among others. She has her Bachelor of Education and Honours B.A. in English and has been teaching memoir and travel writing for twenty years. For further information see: lauriegough.com. 

Lecture Series 7
Impressionism and Beyond (Daytime) – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Angela Marcus

In the 1850s, many European artists opened up art subjects and imagery to reflect the modern world of their time. Following French Impressionism, which developed around 1870 and became a strong force, many modern art movements emerged. In this lecture series, based on the National Gallery’s collection, we will survey the evolution of art from the 1850s, through the 20th, and to the 21st century, tracing art’s progress through Post Impressionism, Fauvism, Cubism, early modern, Dada, Surrealism, Conceptual, Abstract Expressionism, Pop, and beyond, including Canadian Contemporary and Aboriginal art. We will view works from European, American, Canadian, and international sources, discussing topics and issues along the way.

National Gallery entrance fee not included

Note: Please meet at front entrance of the National Gallery of Canada.

  • Days: Tuesdays, October 31st – December 5th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: National Gallery of Canada
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Angela Marcus (BAHons/78, MA/93) has taught Art History/Art Appreciation for over two decades. For several years in Learning in Retirement. She has been an independent researcher, art writer, curator.

NEW! Impressionism and Beyond Section II (Daytime) – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Angela Marcus

In the 1850s, many European artists opened up art subjects and imagery to reflect the modern world of their time. Following French Impressionism, which developed around 1870 and became a strong force, many modern art movements emerged. In this lecture series, based on the National Gallery’s collection, we will survey the evolution of art from the 1850s, through the 20th, and to the 21st century, tracing art’s progress through Post Impressionism, Fauvism, Cubism, early modern, Dada, Surrealism, Conceptual, Abstract Expressionism, Pop, and beyond, including Canadian Contemporary and Aboriginal art. We will view works from European, American, Canadian, and international sources, discussing topics and issues along the way.

National Gallery entrance fee not included

Note: Please meet at front entrance of the National Gallery of Canada.

  • Days: Fridays, November 3rd – December 8th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: National Gallery of Canada
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Angela Marcus (BAHons/78, MA/93) has taught Art History/Art Appreciation for over two decades. For several years in Learning in Retirement. She has been an independent researcher, art writer, curator.

Lecture Series 8
African American Music of the 1940s – 1970s: Blues, R&B, Soul, and Funk

Lecturer: Keith McCuaig

This lecture series will give an overview of some of the most popular musical genres from the 1940s to the 1970s. The history of this music will be covered, including the main figures, important recordings, and the musical features of each style. The cultural importance and impact of this music will also be discussed, including the overlap between these genres, and the ways in which one genre influenced another. From Muddy Waters and Marvin Gaye to Aretha Franklin and James Brown, this series will be an exciting musical journey.

Lectures, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Wednesdays, November 1st – December 6th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: With an M.A. in Music and Culture, and more than twenty years of experience as a musician, Keith  McCuaig is a specialist in all things music and art. He loves exploring the histories of popular music, especially the interconnectedness of genres, and looking at the socio-cultural significance of music. Keith has extensive experience in researching, writing and teaching a variety of musicological topics; he’s delivered guest lectures at two universities, presented at multiple international musicology conferences, and taught musicology courses through Carleton University and the University of Ottawa. From performing, writing, recording, and producing, to lecturing, giving music lessons, and working with community music programs such as Ottawa Bluesfest’s Blues in the Schools and Be in the Band, Keith’s life and passion is music.

Lecture Series 9
From Longhouse to Lumber to Legislation: An Anecdotal History of Ottawa – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Phil Jenkins

A series of six lively lectures combining the anecdotal, biographical, administrative, and infrastructural to provide a chronological social history of Ottawa, from the arrival of the First Nations to the region, through the arrival of the Europeans, to the present multicultural city. The philosophical approach to the story of Bytown/Ottawa running through the lectures is to see how each arriving group (Algonquin, French, British) made use of the geographical setting of Ottawa. Each lecture is augmented by the extensive use of illustrations, photographs, and a song or two, all the songs having some aspect of Ottawa history as their theme.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Wednesdays, November 1st – December 6th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Phil Jenkins returned to Ottawa from Liverpool in 1978, with an honours degree in Environmental Sciences and a Middle Years Teaching Certificate. He is a writer and performing musician. He has written over eight hundred columns on Ottawa’s story in the Ottawa Citizen since 1991, and four national bestsellers; Fields of Vision, An Acre of Time (an Ottawa history), River Song, and Beneath My Feet as well as three commissioned local histories; The Library Book, Off the Shelf, and A Better Heart. He teaches and lectures in writing and Ottawa history.

Lecture Series 10
The Ottoman Empire: From Expanding Power to the Sick Man of Europe – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Oksana Drozdova

The Ottoman state rose to become a world empire that lasted for over five centuries. This lecture series will examine the early history of the Ottoman state, which emerged in Asia Minor during the breakdown of the empire of the Seljuk Turks. It will further explore the conquest of Constantinople by Mahmoud II and the rise of the empire to the pinnacle of its glory. The final session will wrap up the history of the Ottoman Empire from its decline until World War I, when the modern Turkish state led by Mustafa Kemal Ataturk emerged from the empire’s ashes. A discussion of the Turkish language and culture will be integrated into the various lectures of this series.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips, and hands-on learning. Coins and various artifacts will be brought to class to enhance the learning experience.

  • Days: Thursdays, November 2nd – December 7th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Oksana Drozdova is an Ottawa-based researcher and consultant. She studied history and art history at Magnitogorsk State University, in Russia, where she wrote a senior thesis on the artistic representations of Catherine the Great. After completing her undergraduate studies, Ms. Drozdova obtained an MA in history at the University of Ottawa. Her graduate research was centred on Turkey’s relationship with the European Union. Her current areas of research include Turkey, Eastern Europe, and security.

Lecture Series 11
The Balkans: Powder Keg of Europe – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Oksana Drozdova

On the eve of the twentieth century, the Balkans were already known as the “powder keg” of Europe. A mosaic of closely related nations, this region witnessed many inter-ethnic struggles, whose results still determine the life of its people. The Balkan wars of 1912 and 1913, the two World Wars, the Greco-Turkish War of 1919-1921, the Serbo-Croatian war, and the bloody war in Bosnia and Herzegovina: These are but a few of the conflicts that tore the region apart. What turned the Balkans into a land of conflict and contradiction? This lecture series will answer this question by exploring the region’s past.

Lectures, discussion, visual presentations, film clips, and hands-on learning. Coins and various artifacts will be brought to class to enhance the learning experience.

  • Days: Thursdays, November 2nd – December 7th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Oksana Drozdova is an Ottawa-based researcher and consultant. She studied history and art history at Magnitogorsk State University, in Russia, where she wrote a senior thesis on the artistic representations of Catherine the Great. After completing her undergraduate studies, Ms. Drozdova obtained an MA in history at the University of Ottawa. Her graduate research was centred on Turkey’s relationship with the European Union. Her current areas of research include Turkey, Eastern Europe, and security.

Lecture Series 12
Modern Korean History: 1876 – Present – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Brendan Wright

Modern Korea is a curious paradox: Remarkably forward-looking, yet anchored by the ghosts of its tortuous past. How did the peninsula and its people arrive at this point? Where is it going? This lecture series explores the remarkable and often tragic modern history of the Korean peninsula. Topics include traditional Korean culture and society, the role of imperialism, colonialism, civil war, dictatorship, democratization, and the history of North Korea.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Fridays, November 3rd – December 8th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Dr. Wright received his PhD from the University of British Columbia in 2016 in the fields of Korean history, Cold War history, and trauma and memory studies. He has researched, taught, and published on the Korean War, the Vietnam War, international relations, and global history.

Lecture Series 13
A Canadian Perspective on Musical Theatre

Lecturer: Susan Blyth-Schofield

What makes a musical Canadian? Is it the creative team, the cast, the subject, the location of the production? In this lecture series, we will look at all of these factors using shows from the 1950s to the present. We will consider works by Canadian creative teams from Anne of Green Gables to Come From Away. We will examine the growth of a world-class musical theatre scene in Toronto. We will explore work from The Charlottetown Festival, The Stratford Festival, Livent, Mirvish Productions, and other Canadian producers. Lastly, we will look at the contribution of Canadian performers to the art form.

Lectures, discussions, and visual presentations

  • NEW!!! Days: Fridays, November 3rd – December 8th
    • NO CLASS November 10th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Susan Blyth-Schofield is happy to be lecturing again for the Learning in Retirement series having done so previously in 2012 and 2015. She has been a contract instructor at Carleton University since the early 2000’s giving courses in The History of Opera (post 1800) and The History of Musical Theatre. She has also lectured for the JCC Soloway Centre. Susan began her varied musical career as a performer in opera, operetta, and musical theatre across Canada and in Europe with such companies as The Canadian Opera Company, Opera Lyra Ottawa, Comus Music Theatre, Toronto Operetta Theatre, and Festival Estival. Her concert work includes recitals at The Barbican Centre (London), The Canadian Embassy (Washington D.C.) and The National Arts Centre. In Ottawa, she has been a soloist with the Musica Viva Singers, in Opera Gelato, in the Opera in Piazza concerts during Italian Week, with the Ceremonial Band of The Governor General’s Foot Guards, and for Order of Canada Investitures at Rideau Hall.

Behind the scenes, Susan has worked most often as a stage director of opera and musical theatre, although she has been known to turn her hand to stage management from time to time. Her directing credits include work for Carleton’s Musical Theatre Ensemble, Theatrical Adventures Ottawa, Opera Lyra Ottawa, Ooh La La Opera, The Ottawa School of Speech and Drama, Music Unlimited (Brussels), The Queen Elizabeth Dinner Theatre (Toronto), and Between Friends Music Theatre, Kitchener/Waterloo. She holds a Masters in Performance Studies from City University and the Guildhall (London, England), a Bachelor of Music in Performance from The University of Toronto, and is an Associate of The Royal Conservatory of Music, Toronto. She teaches voice and interpretation in her studio in Ottawa, and at Carleton University, where she also directs their Musical Theatre Ensemble. In addition to her one-on-one teaching, Susan is also a sought-after vocal adjudicator and gives frequent workshops and masterclasses on acting for singers, interpretation, and performance anxiety.

Language Series 1
Spanish Conversation for Travellers II – LANGUAGE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Ioana Dimitriu

This language series is intended as a refresher for students who have already acquired basic knowledge of Spanish. The main conversation topic will focus on travelling. A variety of short texts and audiovisual materials will be used to familiarize participants with the diverse socioeconomic and cultural realities of the Spanish-speaking world. Practical for people who wish to travel or for those who have travelled to Spanish-speaking countries and would like to share their experiences while improving their oral Spanish. This series builds on the knowledge acquired in Spanish Conversation for Travellers I, yet, students who have not taken the first series are welcome, provided that they have mastered basic communication skills in Spanish.

While there are no prerequisites to take this language series, please complete this questionnaire if you are interested in registering. The purpose of this questionnaire is to assist you in determining which workshop level, if any, is appropriate for you, based on your current proficiency in Spanish.

Language Workshop

  • Days: Wednesdays and Fridays, November 1st – December 8th
  • Time: 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
  • Location: Room 342, St. Patrick’s Building
  • Fee: $250.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Lecture series outline – coming soon!

Lecturer biography: Ioana Dimitriu holds a Ph.D. in Spanish Literature and an M.A. in Spanish Comparative Linguistics from the University of Ottawa (2010; 2002). Her Doctoral Dissertation focused on the figure of the labyrinth as a literary metaphor in the fantastic prose by Argentine author Jorge Luis Borges, and by Romanian historian of religions Mircea Eliade. She worked as an Assistant to the Ambassador of Argentina to Canada, and as a Spanish Sessional Lecturer at the University of Ottawa (2001-2008) and at Carleton University (2010 – 2017). Ioana also has several years of experience teaching Spanish to adults who learn the language for travel purposes. Ioana’s personal interests include studying theology, exploring other cultures through reading and travel, and kayaking on Loon Lake in South-Eastern Ontario.