Fall 2018 Session I (September 12 – October 22)

The Fall 2018 Session I will run over six weeks and will offer eleven lecture series, four writing workshops, and one language workshop.

To view a PDF version of Learning in Retirement’s Fall 2018 Session I brochure, please click here.

Lecture Series
Fifteen Fascinating Muslims
How Accomplished Architects Live & Die
Understanding Scientific Issues and Controversies
Israel/Palestine: Will It Ever End?
Behind the Headlines: Current News and World Events – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
The Neuropsychology of Memory and Vision – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
The United Nations: What It Is and Does
Actively Listening to Music
Learning to Look: Navigating the Mysteries of the Art World – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Star Stuff to Life
Matters of the Heart: Comprehensive Cardiology

Writing Workshops
Writing the Stories of My Life: Remembering Through Music
The Personal Journal: A Springboard for Memoir – WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Writing Opinion Articles
Writing the Stories of My Life: Remembering Through Fashion

Language Workshop
Spanish for Travellers Level I – WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecture Series 1
Fifteen Fascinating Muslims
Lecturer: H. Masud Taj

From the madrasa graduate establishing the scientific method, to the inventor of algebra; from the geographer of the most accurate map in the pre-modern world, to the theologian poet whose travels exceeded Marco Polo; from a million-word medical encyclopedia, to Enlightenment’s bestselling Arabic novel; from North America’s bestselling poet, to Reagan’s favourite medieval economist; from a woman predating most Sufis, a Sharia judge inspiring Europe’s most freethinking university, to the scholar, who at the pinnacle of his fame, walks away from it all. We will examine their influence as we visit the brighter side of the medieval Dark Ages: the golden-age of Islam.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Mondays, September 10th – October 22nd (no class October 8th)
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 40 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: H Masud Taj, award winning Adjunct Professor of Architecture at Carleton University delivered Keynote at the International Conference of Islamic Art and Architecture. Engaging the Other (Macmillan) featured his research on a medieval mosque, church and synagogue in Andalusia, Spain that was showcased by the Faculty of Public Affairs and at Author Meets Readers event at the Ottawa International Writers Festival. He featured in Portraits of Canadian Writers (The Porcupine’s Quill 2016). His books are archived in the University’s Special Collections and one is inducted in the Library of Parliament.

Lecture Series 2
How Accomplished Architects Live & Die
Lecturer: H. Masud Taj

For lovers of biographies: illustrated lectures on the lives of thirteen accomplished architects from the USA, Europe, Turkey and India. Architects that come alive: Thomas Jefferson & Stanford White, Julia Morgan,   Frank Lloyd Wright & Nari Gandhi, Louis Kahn & Fazlur Khan, Mimar Sinan & Antoni Gaudi, Francesco Borromini & Carlo Scarpa, Le Corbusier & Eilleen Gray. Combining “academic insight, artistic creativity, and unique personal anecdote”, the talks, with wit and verve, seek not to dispel our existential loneliness, but face our finitude with fortitude and irrepressible creativity!

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Mondays, September 10th – October 22nd (no class October 8th)
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 40 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: H. Masud Taj is award winning Adjunct Professor at the Azrieli School of Architecture (and a car-crash, heart-attack survivor). His architectural projects include the Navy Memorial and the House of Last Days, which was commissioned by a dying client. He has featured at International Festival of Authors, Toronto.  His book on Indian apprentice to Architect Frank Lloyd Wright is archived in the Special Collection of Carleton University Library, and his Embassy of Liminal Spaces is a permanent installation in a Canadian Chancery and inducted into the Library of Parliament.

Lecture Series 3
Understanding Scientific Issues and Controversies
Lecturer: Scott Dobson-Mitchell

How does science get made, acquire meaning, and have effects in our lives? What roles do the news, social and entertainment media, citizen science, and other avenues play in establishing our relationship to science? In this lecture series, we study a range of scientific controversies – from climate change to contagious diseases and genetically modified organisms – to build an understanding of these issues and examine why these subjects matter. We examine different theoretical models for science communication, such as the deficit model and the framing model, and use these to approach specific scientific issues and controversies.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Mondays, September 10th – October 22nd (no class October 8th)
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 608, Robertson Hall (Senate Room)
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 50 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Scott Mitchell is a PhD candidate and lecturer in Carleton University’s School of Journalism and Communication, and a former newspaper columnist and writer, blogger and cartoonist with Maclean’s magazine. After completing a BSc in Biomedical Sciences at the University of Waterloo, and a Master of Science with research in bioinformatics, Scott decided to focus his research interests on the public communication of science, risk communication, critical data studies, and visual culture. Scott’s dissertation (which was awarded a Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship) examines digital disease tracking tools and apps, studying how they contribute to conceptions of disease and risk. Scott is a research associate with The Warning Project, an international partnership between academics, consultants, and practitioners that helps organizations build capacity to better communicate during emergencies or other high risk events. He’s also a researcher with Carleton’s ALiGN Digital Media Lab, created by Dr. Merlyna Lim, which works with marginalized communities and groups engaged with challenging dominant narratives, and attempts to make academic research more accessible to general audiences. Scott has published extensively in his field, including in the Canadian Journal of Communication, Communication and the Public, Online Information Review, and Convergence.

Lecture Series 4
Israel/Palestine: Will It Ever End?
Lecturer: Dr. Peter Larson

Over the last 70 years, the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians has cost thousands of lives and imposed misery on many innocent people. To many Canadians, the issue appears unsolvable. It is difficult to have a calm discussion about it, as emotions are high on all sides. This lecture series will examine the Israeli and Palestinian narratives and compare them to the historical record and current reality. We will also look at whether Canada’s current policies are likely to help bring about a resolution.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Tuesdays, September 11th – October 16th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Peter Larson is the Chair of Canada Talks Israel Palestine, (CTIP) a Canadian human rights organization focusing on the Middle East. His professional career included periods at the Public Policy Forum, the Conference Board of Canada, Le Droit, and as a consultant to labour unions and federal government departments and agencies. For the last 10 years, he has taken a particular interest in human rights issues in the Middle East, visiting Israel, Iran, Jordan, Egypt and the occupied Palestinian territories of the West Bank and Gaza. He has also led many trips to Israel/Palestine for Canadians interested in gaining a deeper understanding of the complex Israel/Palestine issue. He is a frequent lecturer for church and labour groups, retiree associations and service clubs. His presentations are appreciated for being fact based and balanced. He was the founding Chair of the Middle East Study Group of the Canadian International Council (National Capital Region), and was also a board member of the National Council on Canada Arab Relations, and the first chair of its National Education Committee on Israel/Palestine. In 2012, he was awarded The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal by the Governor General of Canada in recognition of his educational work on Canada Arab relations. Peter graduated in Economics from the University of Western Ontario in 1968. He holds a Ph.D. in Political Economy from Université de Grenoble, France. In addition to English, he speaks fluent French and passable Italian and Spanish. He lives in Ottawa, Canada.

Lecture Series 5
Behind the Headlines: Current News and World Events – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Elliot Tepper

In this World Affairs lecture series, we will discuss current events that are making the news. Hot topics of the week will be explored in depth, providing context and background for stories in the headlines. We will also be exploring some topics that did not make the headlines, but should have. The content will be determined weekly by emerging issues of importance to Canadians that affect our lives and our world. Come for lively discussion of the news that matters, led by a veteran Carleton University political scientist and media commentator. Perspective and analysis will be provided by the lecturer, followed by discussion with participants.

Lectures, discussions, and visual presentations

  • Days: Tuesdays, September 11th – October 16th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline (not applicable)

Lecturer biography: Dr. Tepper is a veteran professor of comparative politics and international relations at Carleton University. He regularly provides media commentary at home and abroad on a wide range of topics, providing context and deep background to the news stories of the day. Balancing a career in academia and public policy, provides the basis for thoughtful analysis on current events. A lifetime of teaching on-campus and through the public media provides the basis for an engaging, interactive classroom experience. An internationally recognized scholar, Dr. Tepper provides analysis and policy advice to national and international organizations. He has published widely, headed national professional organizations, received many research awards, and serves on the Boards of Directors of a variety of professional and voluntary associations. He is very active with the Ottawa diplomatic corps, academic seminar milieu, and with national and provincial political circles. Current academic titles include: Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs; Senior Research Fellow at NPSIA’s Centre for Security and Defence Studies; Research Fellow, Conference of Defence Associations Institute; Adjunct Research Professor at both Royal Roads University and in his long-time home, the Department of Political Science, Carleton University.

Lecture Series 6
The Neuropsychology of Memory and Vision – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Peter Fried

We like to believe that memories are filed away to be retrieved, in their original state, at a later date. We also tend to believe that “seeing is believing”. In fact, in both cases, this is barely an approximation of what really happens. Memories are modified according to our brain’s current emotions, expectancies, past experiences and beliefs. Similarly, visual perception is shaped by current events, assumptions and biases, so that what we see is as much the product of our brain as our eyes. How the brain constructs our memories and visual perceptions is the theme of these lectures that will include class participation and illustrative clinical findings.

Lectures, discussions, and visual presentations

  • Days: Wednesdays, September 12th – October 17th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Peter Fried (Ph.D) is a Distinguished Research Professor and Professor Emeritus of Carleton University’s Psychology department. His more then four decades of teaching includes introductory psychology, neuropsychology, perception and sensation, physiological psychology as well as in the Learning in Retirement program. He is the director of an investigation, initiated in 1978, of the neurobehavioral consequences of marijuana use during pregnancy upon offspring. His findings are the most widely cited in the marijuana-pregnancy scientific literature and have resulted in numerous awards and invitations to lecture around the world. He has worked with many international neuropsychologists and will couple this collaboration with his own research and teaching experience in this series of lectures.

Lecture Series 7
The United Nations: What It Is and Does
Lecturer: Dr. Marcel Jesenský

The United Nations (UN) touches the lives of people everywhere. It is the latest and most ambitious attempt to build an organization that would harmonize the conflicting interests of our global community, and depends on informed public opinion. In the seventy-plus years since its establishment in 1945, the UN has been central to international relations in such areas as peace, development, human rights, humanitarian assistance, disarmament, and international law. This lecture series introduces this organization’s six principal organs, to promote better understanding about the UN and its presence in our lives.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Wednesdays, September 12th – October 17th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline – coming soon!

Lecturer biography: Dr. Marcel Jesenský is a specialist on the United Nations, international relations, diplomacy and European history. He holds a Ph.D. in History (University of Ottawa). His book The Slovak-Polish Border, 1918-1947 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014) chronicles the legacy of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. He is teaching at the University of Ottawa and Carleton University, and his current research focuses on the Presidency of the United Nations General Assembly.

Lecture Series 8
Actively Listening to Music
Lecturer: Keith McCuaig

This lecture series will help you to fine tune your ears and develop strong listening abilities. Learn about musical forms like the 12-bar blues and 32-bar chorus, and how to identify individual instruments through sound. A wide variety of popular music genres will be covered including rock, pop, blues, country, R&B, reggae, and more. The ultimate goal of this lecture series is to increase your enjoyment of music through a greater understanding of what you are hearing. Our analyses will not be overly technical, and you don’t need to have a musical background; all you need is a love of music.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Thursdays, September 13th – October 18th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: With an M.A. in Music and Culture, and over twenty years experience as a musician, Keith McCuaig is a specialist in all things music and art. He loves exploring the histories of popular music, especially the interconnectedness of genres, and the socio-cultural significance of music. Keith has extensive experience in researching, writing and teaching a variety of music-related topics; he’s taught musicology courses through Carleton University and the University of Ottawa, and presented at international musicology conferences. From performing, writing, recording, and producing, to lecturing, giving music lessons, and working with community music programs such as Ottawa Bluesfest’s Blues in the Schools and Be in the Band, Keith’s life and passion is music.

Lecture Series 9
Learning to Look: Navigating the Mysteries of the Art World – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Maria Martin

Do you feel like a novice when it comes to art? When you visit a gallery or a museum, do you feel overwhelmed by all the landscapes and portraits of people in powdered wigs? And what the heck is that splash of paint on canvas? My kid could do that! This six-week lecture series will help you navigate the mysteries of the art world, and develop your knowledge, appreciation, and comfort level when viewing and discussing art. The class will highlight works from the collection of the National Gallery of Canada, with reference to works from other prominent collections. Each week we will consider a different theme, including portraiture, landscape, history and still-life painting, photography, and abstract art.

Lectures, discussions, and visual presentations

  • Days: Thursdays, September 13th – October 18th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Maria Martin has studied and worked in the Arts for many years. She holds a Master’s Degree in the History of Art from Queen’s University, and a Bachelor’s Degree in Art History from Carleton University. Currently a Manager with the federal government, Maria previously worked at the Canada Council for the Arts as an Art Consultant at the Council’s Art Bank, and as an Education Officer and Guide at the National Gallery of Canada.

Lecture Series 10
Star Stuff to Life
Lecturer: Robert Dick

How ubiquitous is life in the Universe? Life depends on the structure and elements of our Universe. It also depends on an environment conducive to its beginning, which might be provided by planetary bodies. What are the astronomical requirements for life? We’ll discuss why life was successful on Earth, and the basic biochemistry of Earth-based life. We’ll explore how it has changed over the past four billion years. We’ll then look to other planets for similar environments. We will also consider more alien environments, and reassess what’s needed for life to form and flourish.

Lectures, discussions, and visual presentations

  • Days: Fridays, September 14th – October 19th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Mr. Dick is a Professional Engineer with a B.Eng in Mechanical Engineering and a M.Eng in Aerodynamics. Few people can claim to have combined their passion with their profession. Robert is a life member of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada and is actively involved at the national level in several fields for which he has been awarded The President’s Medal and Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada. As a mechanical engineer he has taken lead positions on several aerospace programs and satellites. Based on his reputation as a communicator and educator, he was invited by the Canadian Space Agency to be the astronomy instructor for the Canadian Astronauts. The night sky has drawn Robert outside for over 50 years. Robert shares his knowledge and interest with the public and  has taught full credit courses on astronomy at Carleton University, the University of Ottawa and Algonquin College. Through articles in newspapers and magazines, with contributions to several digital products, and appearances on television and radio, Robert brings a lifelong interest and respect for the night sky and night ecology to the public of all ages. With pictures and films, Robert brings the sky alive for audiences of all ages.

Lecture Series 11
Matters of the Heart: Comprehensive Cardiology
Lecturer: Sarah Beanlands

The heart is a fascinating and complex organ. In this lecture series, all matters of the heart will be discussed, such as the structural anatomy and physiology of this organ, the electrical system of the heart, arrythmia disorders, conditions of the heart valves and vessels, and congenital heart diseases. We will also address the disease progression and treatment for each of these conditions. In addition, cardiac diagnostic technologies and tests will be discussed, as well as cardiac risk factors and ways to keep your heart healthy.

Lectures, discussions, and visual presentations

  • Days: Fridays, September 14th – October 19th (5 weeks; no class October 5th)
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Since graduating as Valedictorian from her Bachelor’s degree in Nursing, Sarah Beanlands has completed a Masters of Science in Health, Science, Technology and Policy and taught at the post- secondary level in multiple settings. As an instructor for Algonquin College, she lectured on theoretical material in classrooms and provided hands-on learning for students in a lab setting. In 2014, she was part of Algonquin College’s Breath of Life Team that travelled to Tanzania to teach local healthcare workers about neonatal resuscitation. Sarah has worked as a registered nurse in a variety of settings, from outpatient adult care as a research assistant, to critical pediatric care at Sick Kids Hospital, and now, as a Public Health Nurse at the Sexual Health Centre and the Safe Injection Site. Sarah started her health care career 8 years ago at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute as a research assistant and presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Society Conference that year. Since then, she has presented at multiple conferences, and has been asked to be the keynote speaker for an event related to the Breath of Life Project.

Writing Workshop 1
Writing the Stories of My Life: Remembering Through Music
Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

We all have a story to tell. However, knowing where to begin can become so overwhelming that we put off writing the story at all. This is an invitation to re-collect, record and share the stories from your life through the lens of music. What are the stories behind your favourite bands – where did you listen to music and what festivals, concerts, or operas did you attend? Did you sing or play a musical instrument? How did music play a role in your family when you were a child? What music did your parents and grandparents enjoy? What music transforms your mood? What was the first song you slow-danced to? What music do you associate with loss, love, and those you love? Please bring your own writing instruments to a safe environment where you will experiment with writing strategies using prompts, share your writing with others, and begin your collection of life-stories.

Workshop

  • Days: Mondays, September 10th – October 22nd (no class October 8th)
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $200.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Writing workshop outline – coming soon!

Lecturer biography: Dr. Anna Rumin is a native Montrealer, whose identity has been shaped by the political landscape of her home province, her Russian roots, and a passion for life-long learning that has been woven both formally in educational institutions and informally through travel, voracious reading, the belief that each person has a unique story to tell, and a near obsession with the outdoors, be it in the forest, on a lake or a mountain. Regardless of who she is working with, Anna is committed to supporting those she leads, by providing them with opportunities to set and meet their goals. Her guiding questions in both her professional and personal life are: “why am I doing what I am doing and how is that practice supported through research, experience, an ethic of caring, and wisdom?” Having moved to Ottawa in the fall of 2014, Anna continues to look for ways in which she can make a meaningful contribution to the community, using the skills she has acquired in the journey that is her life.

Writing Workshop 2
The Personal Journal: A Springboard for Memoir – WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

Hemingway said, “in order to write about life, you must live it”. Whether we call ourselves writers or not, writing gives clarity to our lived experiences. This is a workshop for those who are interested in pausing, looking back and honouring their lives through focused journal writing. While the goal of this writing workshop is to gather memories and stories, participants can expect to learn about writing as a craft, and how it is we go from writing for ourselves to writing for others. We will move from daily “me-centered” free-form writing that is often the spark for creativity, to writing with a purpose and audience.

Workshop

  • Days: Mondays, September 10th – October 22nd (no class October 8th)
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $200.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Writing workshop outline – coming soon!

Lecturer biography: Dr. Anna Rumin is a native Montrealer, whose identity has been shaped by the political landscape of her home province, her Russian roots, and a passion for life-long learning that has been woven both formally in educational institutions and informally through travel, voracious reading, the belief that each person has a unique story to tell, and a near obsession with the outdoors, be it in the forest, on a lake or a mountain. Regardless of who she is working with, Anna is committed to supporting those she leads, by providing them with opportunities to set and meet their goals. Her guiding questions in both her professional and personal life are: “why am I doing what I am doing and how is that practice supported through research, experience, an ethic of caring, and wisdom?” Having moved to Ottawa in the fall of 2014, Anna continues to look for ways in which she can make a meaningful contribution to the community, using the skills she has acquired in the journey that is her life.

Writing Workshop 3
Writing Opinion Articles
Lecturer: Kate Heartfield

Democracy thrives when citizens from all walks of life can express their opinions. There have never been more opportunities to join the public conversation, but it can be hard to make oneself heard. Writers who understand what editors are looking for from opinion pieces, including the unspoken rules and assumptions, will have better luck placing their articles. This workshop will train participants to write and submit opinion articles to newspapers and magazines. Participants will learn how to hook readers, convey expertise in a compelling way, and maybe even change a few minds. The same skills are also applicable to blog posts, social media, and letters to the editor. By the end of the workshop, participants will have a polished op-ed ready to submit.

Lectures, discussions, and hands-on learning

  • Days: Tuesdays, September 11th – October 16th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $200.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Writing workshop outline

Lecturer biography: Kate Heartfield is the former opinion editor of the Ottawa Citizen, where she worked for more than a decade as a columnist, editorial writer and editor. In 2015, she was nominated for a National Newspaper Award in the editorial writing category. That same year, she left the newspaper and now works as a freelancer editor and writer. She also teaches in the journalism department at Carleton University, where she received a master of journalism in 2001. Her undergraduate degree is in political science from the University of Ottawa. Kate is a regular online teacher for the Loft Literary Center and has given workshops in opinion writing to think tanks, non-profits and academics. She is a longtime mentor/editor for The OpEd Project and Informed Opinions. Kate also writes fiction; her first novel, Armed in Her Fashion, was published by ChiZine Publications in 2018. Her interactive novel, The Road to Canterbury, is out now from Choice of Games. Tor.com Publishing will publish two time-travel novellas by Kate beginning in late 2018. Her short stories have appeared in several magazines and anthologies. Kate’s website is kateheartfield.com and she can be found on Twitter as @kateheartfield.

Writing Workshop 4
Writing the Stories of My Life: Remembering Through Fashion
Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

Often we think of a life story or memoir as a chronology of events. However, knowing where to begin can become so overwhelming that we put off writing, despite having a story to tell. This is an invitation to re-collect, record, and share the stories from your life through the lens of fashion. Our clothes are full of stories, history and memories. Are there pieces you cannot give away? What are the stories behind your uniforms and childhood clothes? What were the best ten items of clothing you owned and wore in your twenties, thirties, forties and fifties? Let’s not even start with the shoes! Please bring your own writing instruments to a safe environment where you will experiment with writing strategies using prompts, share your writing with others, and begin your collection of life-stories.

Lectures, discussions, and hands-on learning

  • Days: Tuesdays, September 11th – October 16th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $200.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Writing workshop outline – coming soon!

Lecturer biography: Dr. Anna Rumin is a native Montrealer, whose identity has been shaped by the political landscape of her home province, her Russian roots, and a passion for life-long learning that has been woven both formally in educational institutions and informally through travel, voracious reading, the belief that each person has a unique story to tell, and a near obsession with the outdoors, be it in the forest, on a lake or a mountain. Regardless of who she is working with, Anna is committed to supporting those she leads, by providing them with opportunities to set and meet their goals. Her guiding questions in both her professional and personal life are: “why am I doing what I am doing and how is that practice supported through research, experience, an ethic of caring, and wisdom?” Having moved to Ottawa in the fall of 2014, Anna continues to look for ways in which she can make a meaningful contribution to the community, using the skills she has acquired in the journey that is her life.

Language Workshop
Spanish for Travellers Level I – WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Ioana Dimitriu

This introductory Spanish workshop aims to provide participants with the grammatical and lexical elements that are essential for basic communication. Conversation topics will focus on travel and will include asking for directions, talking about the weather and the schedule, expressing food and accommodation preferences, describing places and tourist attractions, shopping for souvenirs, expressing medical concerns, and making an emergency call. Audiovisual materials will include cultural components related to different parts of the Spanish-speaking world. The workshop is practical for people who wish to be able to communicate in Spanish while travelling; it is also enjoyable for all armchair travellers.

Language workshop

  • Days: Tuesdays & Thursdays, September 11th – October 18th
  • Time: 5:15 p.m. – 6:45 p.m. (1.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 342, St. Patrick’s Building
  • Fee: $250.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Language workshop outline – coming soon!

Lecturer biography: Ioana Dimitriu holds a PhD in Spanish Literature and an MA in Spanish Comparative Linguistics from the University of Ottawa (2010; 2002). Her Doctoral dissertation focused on the figure of the labyrinth as a literary metaphor in the fantastic prose by Argentine author Jorge Luis Borges, and by Romanian historian of religions Mircea Eliade. She worked as an Assistant to the Ambassador of Argentina to Canada, and as a Spanish Sessional Lecturer at the University of Ottawa (2001-2008) and at Carleton University (2010 – 2018). In addition, Ioana has several years of experience teaching Spanish to adults who learn the language for travel purposes. Ioana’s personal interests include studying theology, exploring other cultures through reading and travel, and kayaking on Loon Lake in South-Eastern Ontario.