Fall 2018 Session II (October 29 – December 7)

The Fall 2018 Session II will run over six weeks and will offer the following eleven lecture series, two writing workshops, and one language workshop.

Lecture Series

1. Quantum Weirdness: A Beginner’s Guide – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
2. We Shall Overcome: The Civil Rights Movement Through Song
3. Time is Just a Four Letter Word – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
4. Art Appreciation: Canadian Art (Daytime) – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
5. Women and Islam
6. Revolutions in Russian History – CANCELLED
6b. Learning to Look: Navigating the Mysteries of the Art World, Section II – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
7. “Everybody’s Business”: A Brief History of Diplomacy – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
8. Film Music: The Sounds of Hollywood – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
9. Theories of Personality and Beyond! – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
10. Art Appreciation: Canadian Art (Evening) – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
11. What’s Bugging You: Microbes and the Human Body – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
12. A Brief History of Jazz: Duke, Dizzy, Miles, Monk, Mingus, and More

Writing Workshops

1. Remembering Through Reading: Writing the Stories of My Life – WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
2. Remembering Through Space and Time: Writing the Stories of My Life – WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Language Workshop

1. Hispanic Rhythms for Low Intermediate Spanish Conversation – CANCELLED 
1b. Spanish for Travellers Level I – Section II – LANGUAGE WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN


Lecture Series 1
Quantum Weirdness: A Beginner’s Guide – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Andrew Robinson

The word “quantum” is often used to describe scientific phenomena, or indeed, an advance in a certain field.  Despite its profound conceptual and philosophical challenges to physicists, we can use quantum physics in a wide variety of everyday applications. In this lecture series, we will discuss the basics of what “Quantum Phenomena” are, and what they are not, and show how we experience quantum phenomena in a variety of everyday life situations. This will be a non-mathematical discussion of quantum phenomena and quantum mechanics. No knowledge of physics or mathematics is required.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Mondays, October 29th – December 3rd
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Dr. Andrew Robinson is a Contract Instructor in the Physics Department at Carleton University. He has degrees in Chemical Physics and Physical Chemistry from Bristol University and Bath University. He has worked as a professional scientist in Germany and the UK and moved to Canada in 2000. After working at the University of Saskatchewan, he moved to Ottawa in 2010. His research interest is now the teaching of Physics at the post-secondary level, and he uses innovative technology and pedagogical methods in his classes. He has won Faculty of Science Teaching Awards in 2012, 2014, and 2017.

Lecture Series 2
We Shall Overcome: The Civil Rights Movement Through Song
Lecturer: Dr. Stephen Richer 

The aim of this lecture series is to examine some key songs and singer/song-writers associated with the Abolition and Civil Rights movements in North America. Among the musicians to be discussed are Paul Robeson, Billie Holiday, Pete Seeger, Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Nina Simone, and Buffy Sainte-Marie. Our focus will be on how the biographies of such key personalities interact with historical context to produce protest songs affiliated with the above social movements.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips, and optional collective singing

  • Days: Mondays, October 29th – December 3rd
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline


Lecturer biography:
Dr. Stephen Richer is a retired Professor Emeritus of Sociology and former Chair of the Sociology and Anthropology Department at Carleton University. He has published seven books and many articles, mostly on education and Canadian society. After retirement, he took on several projects, including Education Director on an around-the-world cruise, teaching social research to Cree people on James Bay, leading sing-alongs for Alzheimer’s patients, and producing fundraising shows. He has been a folk/protest singer since he was eighteen and recently led protest singing against the CANSEC arms show and at rallies against the commercial development of Landsdowne Park.

Lecture Series 3
Time is Just a Four-Letter Word – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Peter Watson

Although it is a universal human experience, we understand very little about time. In this lecture series, we will explore how we think about time, how time permeates our culture, and how most of our naïve ideas are wrong. Topics will include how we perceive, talk about, and measure time; how matter bends time; the limits to prediction; time travel; and time’s representation in good literature and bad science.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: NEW! Tuesdays, November 6th – December 11th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Peter Watson infuriated his father by reading far too much science fiction as a kid. He learned physics and math at Edinburgh and Durham universities, and joined Carleton University in 1974, becoming chair of the Physics Dept and then Dean of Science. He has worked at CERN in Switzerland, Oxford and Edinburgh Universities, and spent two years in Nigeria. In addition to a 40 year research career in theoretical physics, he has taught a wide variety of courses at all levels, many involving innovative teaching methods. Although he retired in June 2008, he has continued to teach, give public lectures and do research.

Lecture Series 4
Art Appreciation: Canadian Art (Daytime) – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Angela Marcus

The panorama of art in the updated Canadian Galleries at the National Gallery is the field of exploration for this lecture series. Beginning with New France, we will follow the progress of Canada and its art through influences and practices to our current period. Portraiture, landscape, Group of Seven, Emily Carr, the Canadian Group of Painters, the Beaver Hall Group, the Woodland School, the Automatistes, and Painters Eleven, are some of the classic periods in Canadian art. First Nations’ and Inuit artists’ productions contribute to the varied story of Canadian art history.

Lectures and discussions

  • Days: Tuesdays, October 30th – December 4th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: National Gallery of Canada
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included); National Gallery entrance fee not included
  • Note: Please meet at the front entrance of the National Gallery of Canada.
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Lecture series outline (not applicable)

Lecturer biography: Angela Marcus (B.A. Hons/78 M.A./93) has taught in Art History/Art Appreciation for over two decades. She has taught for several years for the Learning in Retirement Program. She has been an independent researcher, art writer, and curator.

Lecture Series 5
Women and Islam
Lecturer: Dr. Monia Mazigh

This lecture series provides an introduction to contemporary issues related to women’s role in Islam, including veiling, polygamy, Islamic traditions, as well as Islamic feminism. Through a broad range of fiction and non-fiction books, articles, and videos, written by predominantly Muslim authors, the focus will be on historical, social, media, and political representations of Muslim women. Characters of some of the literary works will be studied under the light of common stereotypes. We will avoid the trap of easy media representation or sensationalism based on the orientalist discourse of passive Muslim women who need to be saved. Instead, we will explore the heterogeneity of “Women” and of “Islam”, applying a more nuanced and multidimensional approach.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Tuesdays, October 30th – December 4th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Dr. Monia Mazigh was born and raised in Tunisia and immigrated to Canada in 1991. She speaks Arabic, French, and English fluently and holds a Ph.D. in finance from McGill University. Dr. Mazigh has worked at the University of Ottawa and taught Finance at Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops, British Columbia. In 2004, she ran in the federal election as a candidate for the NDP, gaining the most votes for her riding in the history of the NDP. Dr. Mazigh was catapulted onto the public stage in 2002 when her husband Maher Arar, was deported to Syria where he was tortured and held without charge for over a year. During that time, Dr. Mazigh campaigned vigorously for her husband’s release and later fought to re-establish his reputation and sought reparations. In January 2007, after a lengthy inquiry, her husband finally received an apology from the Canadian. Dr. Mazigh has authored a book called Hope and Despair, which documents her ordeal after her husband was arrested and how she campaigned to clear his name. It was published in 2008 and shortlisted for the Ottawa Book Award. Dr. Mazigh wrote many articles published in the Globe and Mail, The Toronto Star, the Ottawa Citizen, Le Devoir and other newspapers. In 2011, Dr. Mazigh published a novel in French, Miroirs et Mirages. These stories of four Muslim women living in Canada were shortlisted for the prestigious Ontario Trillium award, for the Ottawa Book Award and for the Christine Dimitriu-Van-Saanen Award of the Salon du Livre de Toronto. In summer 2014, Mirrors and Mirages was published in English by the House of Anansi Press. Dr. Mazigh’s second novel about the events of the Arab Spring, Hope has Two Daughters, has been published in English in 2017 by the House of Anansi Press. The book was shortlisted for the Champlain Award. Dr. Mazigh presently lives in Ottawa with her husband and two children.

Lecture Series 6
Revolutions in Russian History – CANCELLED 
Lecturer: Dr. Carter Elwood 

Lecture Series 6b
Learning to Look: Navigating the Mysteries of the Art World, Section II – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Maria Martin

Do you feel like a novice when it comes to art? When you visit a gallery or a museum, do you feel overwhelmed by all the landscapes and portraits of people in powdered wigs? And what the heck is that splash of paint on canvas? My kid could do that! This six-week lecture series will help you navigate the mysteries of the art world, and develop your knowledge, appreciation, and comfort level when viewing and discussing art. The class will highlight works from the collection of the National Gallery of Canada, with reference to works from other prominent collections. Each week we will consider a different theme, including portraiture, landscape, history and still-life painting, photography, and abstract art.

NOTE: This is a repeat of the sold-out Fall 2018 Session I lecture series.

Lectures, discussions, and visual presentations

  • Days: Wednesdays October 31st – December 5th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Maria Martin has studied and worked in the Arts for many years. She holds a Master’s Degree in the History of Art from Queen’s University, and a Bachelor’s Degree in Art History from Carleton University. Currently a Manager with the federal government, Maria previously worked at the Canada Council for the Arts as an Art Consultant at the Council’s Art Bank, and as an Education Officer and Guide at the National Gallery of Canada.

Lecture Series 7
“Everybody’s Business”: A Brief History of Diplomacy LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Marcel Jesenský

Diplomacy, the peaceful conduct of relations amongst states, their leaders and accredited agents, is very old. Even the most ancient and less organized societies required reliable means of communicating and dealing with their neighbours. With the emergence of states, the exigencies of dialogue between communities, rulers, states, and international organizations continue to place a high premium on the work of those skilled in mediation, negotiation, and representation. More than forty years ago, a former diplomat remarked: “In a world where war is everybody’s tragedy and everybody’s nightmare, diplomacy is everybody’s business.” Topics in this lecture series will include diplomatic practice in the “Old World”; Renaissance diplomacy; the evolution of “Old” and “New” diplomacy theory and practice; the role of the League of Nations; the United Nations and the Cold War; and current challenges in diplomacy.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Wednesdays, October 31st – December 5th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline – coming soon!

Lecturer biography: Dr. Marcel Jesenský is a specialist on the United Nations, international relations, diplomacy and European history. He holds a Ph.D. in History (University of Ottawa). His book The Slovak-Polish Border, 1918-1947 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014) chronicles the legacy of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. He teaches at the University of Ottawa and Carleton University, and his current research focuses on the Presidency of the United Nations General Assembly.

Lecture Series 8
Film Music: The Sounds of Hollywood – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Keith McCuaig

Music is a crucial component of virtually all Hollywood films. The sensation of suspense or joy or sadness that a film audience might feel is not only reflected in the music, but often dictated by the music. This lecture series will cover the use of music in film, from the silent era to the present. Film techniques and their relation to the score or soundtrack will also be discussed, as will some of the most prominent Hollywood composers. Each class will feature plenty of examples from films.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Thursdays, November 1st – December 6th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: With an M.A. in Music and Culture, and over twenty years experience as a musician, Keith McCuaig is a specialist in all things music and art. He loves exploring the histories of popular music, especially the interconnectedness of genres, and the socio-cultural significance of music. Keith has extensive experience in researching, writing and teaching a variety of music-related topics; he’s taught musicology courses through Carleton University and the University of Ottawa, and presented at international musicology conferences. From performing, writing, recording, and producing, to lecturing, giving music lessons, and working with community music programs such as Ottawa Bluesfest’s Blues in the Schools and Be in the Band, Keith’s life and passion is music.

Lecture Series 9
Theories of Personality and Beyond!  – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Misha Sokolov

This lecture series will explore how people develop into unique individuals yet remain similar to others. In the first part of the lecture series, we will explore classical theories of personality and contrast them with modern models of personality. The second part of the lecture series will focus on aspects of “Dark Personalities” and “Pathological Personalities”. Finally, we will explore how personality
research can be applied in everyday life, as well as how it is applied by professionals. As part of this class, participants will have the opportunity to anonymously take a series of personality tests.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Thursdays, November 1st – December 6th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Misha Sokolov received his undergraduate degree from University of Ottawa in Psychology, where his research focused on emotional perception and emotional mimicry in the non-suicidal self injury population. Following that, Misha completed the Master of Cognitive Science program at Carleton University, focusing on emotional language production in the psychopathic population. He is currently a PhD candidate in the Department of Psychology at Carleton University, where his research is focused on the linguistic and para-linguistic factors that allow individuals to manipulate others. Aside from research, Misha takes immense meaning from teaching mini-enrichment courses for Ottawa area high school students, and has a deep personal interest in the philosophy of psychology and philosophy of science.

Lecture Series 10
Art Appreciation: Canadian Art (Evening) – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Angela Marcus

The panorama of art in the updated Canadian Galleries at the National Gallery is the field of exploration for this class. Beginning with New France, we will follow the progress of Canada and its art through influences and practices to our current period. Portraiture, landscape, Group of Seven, Emily Carr, the Canadian Group of Painters, the Beaver Hall Group, the Woodland School, the Automatistes, and Painters Eleven are some of the classic periods in Canadian art. First Nations’ and Inuit artists’ productions contribute to the varied story of Canadian art history.

Lectures and discussions

  • Days: Thursdays, November 1st – December 6th
  • Time: 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
  • Location: National Gallery of Canada
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included); Free entrance to the National Gallery on Thursday evenings
  • Note: Please meet at the front entrance of the National Gallery of Canada.
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Lecture series outline (not applicable)

Lecturer biography: Angela Marcus (B.A. Hons/78 M.A./93) has taught in Art History/Art Appreciation for over two decades. She has taught for several years for the Learning in Retirement Program. She has been an independent researcher, art writer, and curator.

Lecture Series 11
What’s Bugging You: Microbes and the Human Body – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Daniel Burnside

Our bodies are full of bacteria, most of it good, some of it bad. What makes one bacteria type beneficial to our health, while another type is a vicious pathogen? After a brief overview of bacteria, viruses, and microbiology laboratory techniques, this lecture series will discuss some of the most common bacterial and viral infections we face. Using recent evidence, we will explore issues such as transmission, antibiotic resistant superbugs, vaccine safety, probiotics, and links between bacteria and mental health. No previous scientific knowledge is required to enjoy this lecture series.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Fridays, November 2nd – December 7th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Daniel Burnside is a microbiologist with a broad range of research interests in the health and biological fields. He primarily studies how proteins interact with each other and uses this information to better understand biological pathways such as the pathways that allow pathogenic microorganisms to invade our bodies. His recent work includes studying Zika virus and HIV infection, analyzing new anti-fungal compounds, and investigating DNA repair pathways. Daniel has taught several courses at Carleton including second and third-year Microbiology of Health. Additionally, he works for a local biotechnology company that develops protein-drugs using computational tools, a new frontier in drug development. He is currently in the final year of his PhD studies in Molecular Microbiology. Daniel aims to make his lectures not only informative, but also entertaining, engaging, and directly applicable to everyday life. He uses simplified explanations, metaphors, and modern examples to impart knowledge that can be translated directly from the classroom to the community. His goal is to make science simple and understandable for everyone.

Lecture Series 12
A Brief History of Jazz: Duke, Dizzy, Miles, Monk, Mingus and More
Lecturer: Adrian Cho

This lecture series will demystify jazz by helping participants understand how jazz originated and evolved, and how it was performed over the years. This will give participants the opportunity to appreciate jazz in its many forms. Key figures in the history of jazz including Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus, Gil Evans, Benny Goodman, and many others will be covered. The instructor will break down jazz performances by providing live demonstrations with other professional jazz musicians.

Lectures, discussions, and musical performances

  • Days: Fridays, November 2nd – December 7th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Adrian Cho performs as a bassist and conductor and the artistic director of the Ottawa Jazz Orchestra, an acclaimed ensemble that brings together an impressive array of professional jazz and symphony musicians. He performs across multiple musical genres in formats ranging from solo bass to large ensembles. Described by press, audiences and collaborators as “a cool guide to hot jazz,” “a musical missionary,” “a gifted teacher,” “a visionary and true collaborator” and “an extraordinary leader,” Adrian is the author of the acclaimed book, The Jazz Process: Collaboration, Innovation and Agility and has spoken about jazz and agility to corporate, academic and conference audiences throughout North America and Europe.

Writing Workshop 1
Remembering Through Reading: Writing the Stories of My Life – WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

A library is a good place to go when you feel unhappy, for there, in a book, you may find encouragement and comfort. A library is a good place to go when you feel bewildered or undecided, for there, in a book, you may have your question answered. Books are good company, in sad times and happy times, for books are people – people who have managed to stay alive by hiding between the covers of a book.” E.B White.

We all have a story to tell. Often we think of a life story or memoir as a chronology of events. However, knowing where to begin can become so overwhelming that we put off writing the story at all. This is an invitation to re-collect, record and share the stories from your life through the lens of reading. What picture books, novels, collections of poetry, songs, magazines, journals, fiction, non-fiction, science fiction, or historical fiction played an important role in your life? How might writing about what we read give us a glimpse into who we were and who we have become? Please bring your own writing instruments to a safe environment where you will experiment with writing strategies using prompts, share your writing with others, and begin your collection of life-stories.

Hands-on learning

  • Days: Tuesdays, October 30th – December 4th
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $200.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Writing workshop outline – coming soon!

Lecturer biography: Dr. Anna Rumin is a native Montrealer, whose identity has been shaped by the political landscape of her home province, her Russian roots, and a passion for life-long learning that has been woven both formally in educational institutions, and informally through travel, voracious reading, the belief that each person has a unique story to tell, and a near obsession with the outdoors, be it in the forest, on a lake or a mountain. Regardless of who she is working with, Anna is committed to supporting those she leads, by providing them with opportunities to set and meet their goals. Her guiding questions in both her professional and personal life are: “why am I doing what I am doing and how is that practice supported through research, experience, an ethic of caring, and wisdom?” Having moved to Ottawa in the fall of 2014, Anna continues to look for ways in which she can make a meaningful contribution to the community using the skills she has acquired in the journey that is her life.

Writing Workshop 2
Remembering Through Space and Time: Writing the Stories of My Life  – WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

We all have a story to tell. However, knowing where to begin can become so overwhelming that we put off writing the story at all. This is an invitation to re-collect, record, and share the stories from your life through space and time. What spaces and places have played an important role in your life? What are your memorable journeys, big and small? How does “exploration” give us
a glimpse into who we were and who we have become? What are our “a-ha!” moments that best illustrate a particular story, at a particular time, and in a particular place? Please bring your own writing instruments to a safe environment where you will experiment with writing strategies using prompts, share your writing with others, and begin your collection of life-stories.

Workshop

  • Days: Tuesdays, October 30th – December 4th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $200.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Writing workshop outline – coming soon!

Lecturer biography: Dr. Anna Rumin is a native Montrealer, whose identity has been shaped by the political landscape of her home province, her Russian roots, and a passion for life-long learning that has been woven both formally in educational institutions, and informally through travel, voracious reading, the belief that each person has a unique story to tell, and a near obsession with the outdoors, be it in the forest, on a lake or a mountain. Regardless of who she is working with, Anna is committed to supporting those she leads, by providing them with opportunities to set and meet their goals. Her guiding questions in both her professional and personal life are: “why am I doing what I am doing and how is that practice supported through research, experience, an ethic of caring, and wisdom?” Having moved to Ottawa in the fall of 2014, Anna continues to look for ways in which she can make a meaningful contribution to the community using the skills she has acquired in the journey that is her life.

Language Workshop 1
Hispanic Rhythms for Low Intermediate Spanish Conversation – CANCELLED
Lecturer: Dr. Ioana Dimitriu 

Language Workshop 1b
Spanish for Travellers Level 1 – Section II – LANGUAGE WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Ioana Dimitriu

This introductory Spanish workshop aims to provide participants with the grammatical and lexical elements that are essential for basic communication. Conversation topics will focus on travel and will include asking for directions, talking about the weather and the schedule, expressing food and accommodation preferences, describing places and tourist attractions, shopping for souvenirs, expressing medical concerns, and making an emergency call. Audiovisual materials will include cultural components related to different parts of the Spanish-speaking world. The workshop is practical for people who wish to be able to communicate in Spanish while travelling; it is also enjoyable for all armchair travellers.

Language workshop

  • Days: Tuesdays & Thursdays, October 30th – December 6th
  • Time: 5:15 p.m. – 6:45 p.m. (1.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 342, St. Patrick’s Building
  • Fee: $250.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Language workshop outline – coming soon!

Lecturer biography: Ioana Dimitriu holds a PhD in Spanish Literature and an MA in Spanish Comparative Linguistics from the University of Ottawa (2010; 2002). Her Doctoral dissertation focused on the figure of the labyrinth as a literary metaphor in the fantastic prose by Argentine author Jorge Luis Borges, and by Romanian historian of religions Mircea Eliade. She worked as an Assistant to the Ambassador of Argentina to Canada, and as a Spanish Sessional Lecturer at the University of Ottawa (2001-2008) and at Carleton University (2010 – 2018). In addition, Ioana has several years of experience teaching Spanish to adults who learn the language for travel purposes. Ioana’s personal interests include studying theology, exploring other cultures through reading and travel, and kayaking on Loon Lake in South-Eastern Ontario.