Fall 2018 Single Lecture Presentations

The Fall 2018 Single Lecture Presentations will offer several single daytime and evening lectures offered throughout the months of September and October.

Single Lecture Presentations

1. Artificial Intelligence Demystified (September 24th)
2. The Art of Jazz Singing (September 25th)
3. Rebels and Radicals: Canada and the Spanish Civil War (September 26th)
4. Plunder or Preservation? Lord Elgin and the Marbles (September 27th)
5. Three Voyagers: The Student, the Scholar, and the Admiral (October 1st)
6. How to Enjoy Reading James Joyce’s Ulysses – CANCELLED
7. Coping and Hoping…without God (October 3rd)
8. The Gouzenko Affair: A Watershed Moment in Canadian History (October 4th)
9. What’s Wrong with Gaza? Why Won’t Hamas Make Peace? (October 10th) FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
10. The Mavericks: Comets and Asteroids (October 11th)
11. A Canadian Abroad: Architecture, Poetry, and Calligraphy (October 15th)
12. Pawsitive Support (October 17th)
13. Wisdom that Brings Us to Peace and Happiness (October 18th)
14. Whistleblowers: Criminals or Heroes? (October 22nd)
15. Difficult Conversations (October 23rd)
16. The Conscious Mind (October 23rd)
17. Welcome to Romania! (October 23rd)Teal
NEW! 17b. Fifty Years of Darkness: Why We STILL Don’t Know What the Universe is Made of! (October 24th)
18. The Human Microbiome and How It Affects Health (October 24th)
19. The Art of Jazz Singing (Section II: repeat of Section I) (October 24th)
20. (re)Conciliation in Haudenosaunee Culture and Practice (October 25th)
21. Ottawa Architectural Landscape: Exploring Prosperity and Memory through Built Heritage (October 25th)
22. Theology in Colour: Introduction to Byzantine Iconography (October 25th)
23. War Art or War Memorial? What Exactly is Canada’s War Art? (October 29th)


Lecture 1
Artificial Intelligence Demystified
Lecturer: Misha Sokolov

Popular media depiction of artificial intelligence (AI) is a confused whirlwind of amazement and alarmism. On the one hand, we are told that AI will revolutionize our world; on the other, that it is going to put humans out of work, or worse. Unfortunately, most reporters, and their audiences, are woefully under-educated about the topic. In this lecture, we will go over the hundred year-old history of intelligent machines, discuss what they are, how they work, and why there is so much hype surrounding them right now.

Lecture, discussion, visual presentation, and film clips

  • Day: Monday, September 24th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Misha Sokolov received his undergraduate degree from University of Ottawa in Psychology, where his research focused on emotional perception and emotional mimicry in the non-suicidal self injury population. Following that, Misha completed the Master of Cognitive Science program at Carleton University, focusing on emotional language production in the psychopathic population. He is currently a PhD candidate in the Department of Psychology at Carleton University, where his research is focused on the linguistic and para-linguistic factors that allow individuals to manipulate others. Aside from research, Misha takes immense meaning from teaching mini-enrichment courses for Ottawa area high school students; and has a deep personal interest in philosophy of psychology, and philosophy of science.

Lecture 2
The Art of Jazz Singing (Section I)
Lecturer: Dr. Diane Nalini

Join jazz singer and songwriter Diane Nalini for an entertaining and engaging exploration of the art of jazz singing. With examples from Bessie Smith, Ella Fitzgerald, Nat King Cole, Sarah Vaughan, Billie Holiday, and others, she will provide insights into what made these singers so unique. Diane will also do live demonstrations, so participants will come away with a better understanding of different approaches to phrasing, interpreting a song, and interacting with musicians. (Note: Section I and Section II of this lecture presentation contain the same content)

Lecture, film clips, and short performances

  • Day: Tuesday, September 25th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Singer/songwriter Diane Nalini composes and sings in four languages. She has been a professional jazz singer for over 25 years and has recorded and produced four critically-acclaimed albums. She has sung at jazz festivals around the globe, and given gala performances for President Bill Clinton and Sir Paul McCartney. She was nominated for the Grand Prix de Jazz General Motors at the 2002 Montreal International Jazz Festival and was one of two finalists for the UK’s Young Jazz Vocalist of the Year awards for 2001. Diane’s original songs have also been featured in television, independent films, as well as the Hollywood movie “Charlotte Grey” starring Cate Blanchett, which featured her song “L’amour d’autrefois”, co-written with UK arranger/composer Dick Walter. Diane is also the resident vocalist with the Ottawa Jazz Orchestra and sings regularly with them at the National Arts Centre.

Dr. Nalini has given several keynote addresses for the Regina Teachers’ Association’s annual conference, the Bell Regional Science Fair in Montreal, the University of Waterloo, and the Dawson College graduation ceremony. Diane obtained her B.Sc. in Honours Physics from McGill University in 1995, and her doctorate in Materials Science (in the field of applied nuclear physics) from the University of Oxford in 1999, where she was a Rhodes Scholar. She then held two post-doctoral fellowships (she was an 1851 Research Fellow in the Department of Materials at the University of Oxford and the Salvesen Junior Research Fellow at New College, Oxford). She later joined the faculty at the University of Guelph for five and half years in the physics department, where she taught undergraduate physics, astronomy as well as an innovative course on the physics of music which allowed her to combine her two passions. She has also given numerous workshops and training sessions, and has been a guest speaker for numerous organizations. For the past seven years, Diane has lived in Ottawa. In her day job, she has held various roles for the federal Public Service. For more information, other press reviews and to listen to Diane’s music, please visit: dianenalini.com.

Lecture 3
Rebels and Radicals: Canada and the Spanish Civil War
Lecturer: Dr. Patryk Polec

What would compel more than 1,500 Canadians to travel to Spain to confront fascist forces when the Spanish Civil War erupted in 1936? Almost none of the volunteers had any personal connection to Spain. About 400 of them were killed. In the decades following the war, even as thousands more Canadians were soon fighting fascism in Europe during the Second World War, Canadian Spanish Civil War veterans had difficulty getting recognition at home. A monument to their memory was finally erected in Ottawa in 2001. This lecture focuses on the Canadian volunteers who formed their own fighting unit, the Mackenzie-Papineau Battalion, and their legacy. It will also explore Canada’s response to the war, government surveillance, and memory and commemoration.

Lecture, discussion, visual presentation, and film clips

  • Day: Wednesday, September 26th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Patryk Polec has a PhD from the University of Ottawa, where he taught Canadian History as an Assistant Professor. His main areas of interest include ethnic and immigration history, surveillance, 20th century radicalism, and military history. He has also worked as an historical consultant in the public and private sectors, advising on heritage projects and commemoration. He is the author of Hurrah Revolutionaries (McGill-Queen’s University Press), and A Diary at Sea (Gdansk University Press). He has published numerous articles in peer-reviewed journals and edited collections.

Lecture 4
Plunder or Preservation? Lord Elgin and the Marbles
Lecturer: David Walden

The “Elgin Marbles” (now referred to as the “Parthenon Marbles”) comprise a collection of Classical Greek marble sculptures and architectural features that were part of the temple of Parthenon and other buildings on the Acropolis Hill in Athens. From 1801 to 1812, Thomas Bruce, the 7th Earl of Elgin, and his agents removed about half of the sculptures of the Parthenon and transported them to Britain, amid controversy over Elgin’s actions. Discover the story of the marbles from 1801 to the present, exploring the circumstances of their removal, their “life” at the British Museum, and the ongoing efforts of the Government of Greece to have them returned. The return of the marbles is still contemporary, controversial, and political, as Greece is threatening to oppose any Brexit agreement in the European Parliament if the marbles are not returned.

Lecture and visual presentation

  • Day: Thursday, September 27th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: David Walden holds a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in History and Political Science and a Master of Arts in Canadian Studies, both from Carleton University. He has over  30 years’ experience working with UNESCO, culminating in his appointment as Secretary-General of the Canadian Commission for UNESCO in 1999. David’s extensive international involvement includes chairing the UNESCO Intergovernmental Committee for Promoting the Return of Cultural Property to its Countries of Origin or its Restitution in Case of Illicit Appropriation; the Executive Board and General Conference of UNESCO; the International Network on Cultural Policy; and the UN Economic Commission for Europe. A member of the Executive Management Committee of the Canada Council for the Arts from 1999 until his retirement in 2013, David now works as a consultant in international organizations and governance. Since 2013 he has also been a lecturer in cultural affairs and cultural policy at Carleton University, the University of Ottawa, and Brock University. David currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Perley and Rideau Veterans’ Health Centre (Ottawa) where he is a member of the Executive Committee and the Chair of the Stakeholder and Community Relations Committee.

Lecture 5
Three Voyagers: The Student, the Scholar, and the Admiral
Lecturer: H. Masud Taj 

This lecture probes the historical relationship between the twin superpowers of the past: the empires of the Muslim world and China. In the 12th century CE, the daughter of an Andalusian merchant in China travels to Isfahan/Baghdad to study, then to Damascus/Cairo to teach; when she dies, her students continue her travels and her work as educators. In the 14th century, a scholar returns home with tales from his thirty years wandering between Morocco and China, covering more distance than anyone ever had until then. In the 15th century, a Chinese admiral sails west on a mission of imperial power and peace, completing seven voyages on a fleet of the largest ships the world had ever seen. The journey quests of three Muslims ripple across centuries to reach our time.

Lecture, discussion, visual presentation, and film clips

  • Day: Monday, October 1st
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 40 participants

Lecturer biography: H Masud Taj is award winning Adjunct Professor at Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism and lectures on topics of Muslim Civilization at the Centre for Initiatives in Education. He delivered the Keynote at the Second International Conference of Islamic Art & Architecture. His research in Andalusia, Spain featured at the Faculty of Public Affairs and at Author Meets Readers, Ottawa International Writers Festival. He featured in the International Festival of Authors in Toronto, and recently in Portraits of Canadian Writers. His books are archived in Carleton University Special Collections; The Embassy of Liminal Spaces was permanently installed in a Canadian Chancery and inducted in the Library of Parliament.

Lecture 6
How to Enjoy Reading James Joyce’s Ulysses – CANCELLED
Lecturer: Sylvie Hill

Explicit, stylistic, and a challenging read, Ulysses is as entertaining as it is complex, and reading it remains on many people’s “To Do” list. Ulysses, modeled after Homer’s Odyssey, is the story of Molly and Leopold Bloom, and Stephen Dedalus from Joyce’s autobiographical novel, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. The story unfolds over the course of one day, June 16, 1904, which is celebrated internationally each year as “Bloomsday”. After this lecture, participants will understand how to approach and finish one of the most important (and previously banned) books of the 20th century.

Lecture, discussion, visual presentation, and film clips

  • Day: Tuesday, October 2nd
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Professor Sylvie Hill holds an M.A. in English Literature and Language from Carleton University. The focus of her research explored the intersection of sexual frustration and artistic expression in James Joyce’s Ulysses. Her passion for teaching the topic of sexuality in literature is evident in the many courses she has created at uOttawa’s past Personal Enrichment Activities Program, including popular workshops on James Joyce (presented at McGill University as part of Bloomsday 2016), “Tales of Female Betrayals” and “Women Who (M)use Men.” Sylvie is also poet and former fiery columnist whose writing is well known to Ottawans.

Lecture 7
Coping and Hoping…without God
Lecturer: Dr. Tom Sherwood

A traditional function of religion is to respond to human suffering, interpreting the experience and offering support. But some people see religion itself as a cause of suffering. Where do they turn for answers and comfort when facing death, disease, disaster, and divorce? Many are the children and grandchildren of religious people who reject family religious traditions. Many identify as “SBNR” (Spiritual But Not Religious) and are quite vocal in identifying religion as a source of suffering. Tom Sherwood reports on his study of this attitude, and the theodicy that develops when bad things happen to SBNR people.

Lecture, discussion, and visual presentation

  • Day: Wednesday, October 3rd
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Tom Sherwood has two sets of professional credentials. As an ordained United Church minister, he had a full-time clergy career in parish and campus ministry (including as Carleton University Chaplain, 1999-2009). As a part-time university teacher since 1982, he has taught courses in anthropology, sociology, and religion at Carleton and Saint Paul University from First Year to M.A. levels. In 2009, he was appointed the McGeachy Senior Scholar in the United Church of Canada, and commissioned to undertake a national study of the spirituality and values of Canadians born in the 1980s, published as Listening to The Echo – young adults talk about religion, spirituality, God, gods and their world (FriesenPress, 2016). His research has also been published in several articles and book chapters, and presented in documentary theatre projects: The god Monologues (2013), godVERBATIM in the 2014 Ottawa Fringe Festival, O god in the 2015 Fringe, Trans-Script in 2016-18, and Hope? In 2018. He continues to teach and supervise graduate students at Carleton, and in 2017-18 is Dean of the Ottawa School of Theology and Spirituality.

Lecture 8
The Gouzenko Affair: A Watershed Moment in Canadian History
Lecturer: Dr. Patryk Polec

On September 5, 1945, Igor Gouzenko, a 26-year-old cipher clerk who worked for a branch of Soviet intelligence in Ottawa, decided to defect. He left the Soviet Embassy with over 100 documents stuffed under his shirt. After several unsuccessful attempts, Gouzenko convinced Canadian authorities that an elaborate Soviet spy ring was operating in Canada. The Gouzenko Affair, as it became known, sparked the Cold War, and it changed the way Canadians saw the chilling relations between East and West after the Second World War. This lecture will examine the Gouzenko Affair, and its impact on both international Cold War-era relations and the Canadian government’s approach to dealing with an extensive espionage network in Canada.

Lecture, discussion, visual presentation, and film clips

  • Day: Thursday, October 4th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Patryk Polec has a PhD from he University of Ottawa, where he taught Canadian History as an Assistant Professor. His main areas of interest include ethnic and immigration history, surveillance, 20th century radicalism, and military history. He has also worked as an historical consultant in the public and private sectors, advising on heritage projects and commemoration. He is the author of Hurrah Revolutionaries (McGill-Queen’s University Press), and A Diary at Sea (Gdansk University Press). He has published numerous articles in peer-reviewed journals and edited collections.

Lecture 9
What’s Wrong with Gaza? Why Won’t Hamas Make Peace? – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Peter Larson

Of all of the Israel/Palestine tensions, Gaza seems to be a perennial hotspot. In the last 10 years there have been three murderous wars in which thousands have been killed. A new phase of the conflict was launched last March 30 when thousands of (mostly) unarmed Palestinians marched to the Gaza perimeter, demanding an end to the blockade and the right to return to their homes and villages, which are now in Israel. They were met by Israeli military force. Dr. Larson visited Gaza in April, saw the demonstrations, and spoke to participants, medical staff, and even some of the organizers. He will report on what he saw and heard. He will also put this current conflict in the context of the history of the tensions between Israel and Gaza, and examine the role of Hamas.

Lecture, discussion, visual presentation, and film clips

  • Day: Wednesday, October 10th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Peter Larson is the Chair of Canada Talks Israel Palestine, (CTIP) a Canadian human rights organization focusing on the Middle East. His professional career included periods at the Public Policy Forum, the Conference Board of Canada, Le Droit, and as a consultant to labour unions and federal government departments and agencies. For the last 10 years, he has taken a particular interest in human rights issues in the Middle East, visiting Israel, Iran, Jordan, Egypt and the occupied Palestinian territories of the West Bank and Gaza. He has also led many trips to Israel/Palestine for Canadians interested in gaining a deeper understanding of the complex Israel/Palestine issue.He is a frequent lecturer for church and labour groups, retiree associations and service clubs. His presentations are appreciated for being fact based and balanced. He was the founding Chair of the Middle East Study Group of the Canadian International Council (National Capital Region), and was also a board member of the National Council on Canada Arab Relations, and the first chair of its National Education Committee on Israel/Palestine. In 2012, he was awarded The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal by the Governor General of Canada in recognition of his educational work on Canada Arab relations.Peter graduated in Economics from the University of Western Ontario in 1968. He holds a Ph.D. in Political Economy from Université de Grenoble, France. In addition to English, he speaks fluent French and passable Italian and Spanish. He lives in Ottawa, Canada.

Lecture 10
The Mavericks: Comets and Asteroids
Lecturer: Robert Dick

Occasionally, comets provide a faint celestial display for rural citizens and people in darkened suburbs. Most pass by out-of-sight and out-of-mind. Their importance in the formation of our solar system and our world is usually ignored or dismissed. However, comets and asteroids were the building blocks of Earth. Their precarious orbits also continue to put our world at risk. This presentation will answer questions about the contribution of comets and asteroids to the formation and evolution of our solar system. What can they tell us about the dangers that lurk in the darkness?

Lecture, discussion, and visual presentation

  • Day: Thursday, October 11th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Mr. Dick is a Professional Engineer with a B.Eng in Mechanical Engineering and a M.Eng in Aerodynamics. Few people can claim to have combined their passion with their profession. Robert is a life member of the Royal astronomical Society of Canada and is actively involved at the national level in several fields for which he has been awarded The President’s Medal and Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada. As a mechanical engineer he has taken lead positions on several aerospace programs and satellites. Based on his reputation as a communicator and educator, he was invited by the Canadian Space Agency to be the astronomy instructor for the Canadian Astronauts. The night sky has drawn Robert outside for over 50 years. Robert shares his knowledge and interest with the public and has taught full credit courses on astronomy at Carleton University, the University of Ottawa and Algonquin College.Through articles in newspapers and magazines, with contributions to several CD-ROM and DVD products, and appearances on television and radio, Robert brings a lifelong interest and respect for the night sky and night ecology to the public of all ages. With pictures and films, Robert brings the sky alive for the audience of all ages.

Lecture 11
A Canadian Abroad: Architecture, Poetry, and Calligraphy
Lecturer: H. Masud Taj

For the past decade, the lecturer has been travelling abroad each summer: researching in the libraries of Oxford University; field researching in Ottoman sites in Turkey, Andalusian sites in Spain, and the boom-towns of the Gulf in Middle East; and lecturing in England and different cities of India (some of the sites of his architectural projects). We follow the trail of one such summer and share his creative productions and projects poetic, calligraphic, videographic, and architectural. Participants will gain an insight into how the creative process works in situations as mundane as tackling a parking ticket to designing a house for a man to spend his last days.

Lecture, discussion, visual presentation, and film clips

  • Day: Monday, October 15th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 40 participants

Lecturer biography: H Masud Taj is award winning Adjunct Professor at Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism and lectures on topics of Muslim Civilization at Carleton University’s Centre for Initiatives in Education. He delivered the Keynote at the Second International Conference of Islamic Art & Architecture. His research in Andalusia, Spain was featured at the Faculty of Public Affairs and at Author Meets Readers, Ottawa International Writers Festival. He featured in the International Festival of Authors in Toronto, as well as in Portraits of Canadian Writers. His books are archived in Carleton University Special Collections; The Embassy of Liminal Spaces was permanently installed in a Canadian Chancery and inducted in the Library of Parliament.

Lecture 12
Pawsitive Support
Lecturer: Shannon Noonan

Positive Psychology experts have suggested more proactive, holistic approaches for individuals to learn about different coping mechanisms, resilience, and self-care. Shannon Noonan is here to discuss a more “pawsitive” approach and how “man’s best friend” is proving to be a viable strategy to assist with mental health. This discussion will delve into some of the scientific reasons why we feel so good around our pets, and how to tap into their potential. It will also provide some insight into the different types of working dogs you may see in Ottawa. There will be a therapy dog present, whom you will be welcome to meet and greet if you like.

Lecture, discussion, and visual presentation

  • Day: Wednesday, October 17th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture poster

Lecturer biography: Shannon is a Student Affairs professional who works with students to engage them in taking care of their own wellness. Shannon believes in Pet Therapy as a viable strategy to help support students in their transition to university, as well as sustained mental health. This is achieved thanks to the therapeutic effects of animal contact, including: reduced homesickness, increased confidence levels through social interaction, building trusting relationships, and physical health benefits. Contact with a dog increases levels of oxytocin (stress reducing hormone) in the brain and reduces the levels of cortisol. Shannon has used pet therapy to connect with Carleton students on a level unparalleled by other professional interactions. In the past, Blue and Shannon have facilitated a number of referrals to counsellors, and provided a low-level, less resource-intensive outlet for students who simply needed a visit with the dog to cope with everyday stresses. Blue was appointed the position of the official ESP Therapy Dog for students in the Enriched Support Program in order to assist with retention and sense of belonging for students in the program. Alongside Blue, Shannon has supported students through any issue ranging from missing home to larger problems like drug addiction or financial crisis. Shannon is an experienced people-manager who is trained in suicide intervention, mental health first aid, and motivational interviewing; she is also a member of the Campus Student Mental Health Advisory Committee, and a trained Therapy Dog volunteer. Shannon currently works as a Special Projects Officer for Student Mental Health in the Office of the Vice President (Students and Enrolment). Shannon holds a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from the University of New Brunswick. Blue is a registered Ottawa Therapy Dog, and has been certified through the Canadian Kennel Club as an official Canine Good Neighbour. He has also passed his Level 2 Agility with flying colors!

Lecture 13
Wisdom that Brings Us to Peace and Happiness
Lecturer: Tan Ngo

In Buddhism, all paths must lead to “wisdom”. If one practices deeply, one would discover that body and mind are equally empty. This realization leads one to overcome all discontents. This lecture will help participants understand the essences of Buddhism using the discourse “Wisdom that Takes Us to the Other Shore”. Does “the self” exist or is it just a flawed assumption? Do “Objects of Mind” have their own self-nature, or are they actually empty? These two important aspects, if viewed rightly, can bring peace and happiness to people even in materialistic societies.

Lecture, discussion, and visual presentation

  • Day: Thursday, October 18th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Tan was born in Vietnam and started his Buddhist monkhood at the age of 8. After the death of his teacher, Tan left the monastery and joined the South Vietnamese army in 1971 as a lieutenant. After the fall of Saigon in 1975, Tan was confined in several concentration camps in Vietnam. After 3 years in the camps, Tan escaped as part of the boat people and settled in Ottawa in 1978. Tan worked as a database specialist in the government and retired in 2004. Tan returned to monkhood in 2011, and began his PhD studies in Political Science at Carleton in the fall of 2016. He has an MA in Religion and Public Life from Carleton University and a BA in Psychology from the University of Ottawa. Presently, Tan is a teaching assistant to first year political science courses. In 2017, Tan was nominated for an Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award. Tan’s research interests lie primarily in comparative politics and public affairs and policy analysis. On request, Tan gives presentations on Buddhism to high school students in the Ottawa area. Tan has also been a guest speaker to students at Carleton University. Tan teaches Myanmar tradition meditation to people who are interested in learning how to relax and live a stress-free life. His Buddhist practice is rooted in Mahayana tradition.

Lecture 14
Whistleblowers: Criminals or Heroes?
Lecturer: Kathy Dobson

Most whistleblowers are corporate or governmental insiders who anonymously report internal misconduct. Why and under what circumstances do people either act on the spot to stop illegal and otherwise unacceptable behaviour, or report it to the media? And why does the public often have such divisive and changing responses to these whistleblowers, who arguably are only looking out for the greater good? For example, Daniel Ellsberg, who leaked the Pentagon Papers to the New York Times, faced terrible repercussions by the Nixon administration at the time, but is now widely acknowledged as courageous. Within this historical context, we will explore contemporary whistleblowers such as Edward Snowden and Chelsea Manning, and websites such as Julian Assange’s WikiLeaks.

Lecture and visual presentation

  • Day: Monday, October 22nd
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Kathy Dobson is an award-winning journalist and published creative non-fiction author with extensive teaching and guest speaking experience. She is a Vanier Scholar in the School of Journalism and Communication at Carleton University currently completing a PhD, with numerous peer-reviewed academic publications. Her research interests include the datafication of social assistance programs, media framing of marginalized communities, and the political economy of news. Her dissertation (which was awarded a Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship, Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship, and Ontario Graduate Scholarship) is examining how welfare fraud detection programs are used to support misleading media narratives about ‘welfare cheats.’ Kathy is a researcher and member of the ALiGN Media Lab, created by Dr. Merlyna Lim, which includes working with marginalized communities and groups engaged with challenging dominant narratives. Prior to starting her PhD, Kathy worked as a journalist and news photographer for over 20 years. Her work has appeared in numerous national newspapers and magazines, including the Globe and Mail, National Post, Ottawa Citizen, Montreal Gazette, and Maclean’s, Canadian Living, and Chatelaine magazines. She also worked for the CBC for over seven years, producing documentaries and news stories on a variety of social issues. She also hosts The Poverty Report, a podcast featured on the Carleton University ALiGN Media Lab, and has been twice awarded the Robert McKeown Doctoral Scholarship in Communication. Kathy is also an award winning creative non-fiction author. Her first book, With A Closed Fist: Growing up in Canada’s Toughest Neighbourhood (Vehicule Press, 2001) is a memoir and about to go into its third printing. Her second book, Kicking and Punching: Leaving Canada’s Toughest Neighbourhood (Vehicule Press, 2018) will be released early next month. She is also currently writing a book, The History of Whistleblowing, to be published in 2019.

Lecture 15
Difficult Conversations
Lecturer: Dr. Rebecca Bromwich

Difficult conversation and interpersonal conflict are inevitable in our personal and professional lives, as well as in politics. Most of us find it tempting to avoid difficult conversation altogether but avoiding conflict can prevent us from moving forward in our work and personal relationships. Learn practical suggestions, grounded in theories about negotiation and mediation developed at the Harvard Negotiation Project, to keep projects and people functioning productively. Knowing how to navigate a difficult conversation will ensure that you are able to have those challenging, yet important, dialogues in a way that allows you to reach your goals and maintain good relationships. This lecture will help equip participants to step up to manage conflict in relationships and have transformative conversations, no matter how difficult it might be.

Lecture and visual presentation

  • Day: Tuesday, October 23rd
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Rebecca Jaremko Bromwich is Program Director for the Graduate Diploma in Conflict Resolution program. Dr. Bromwich is also a per diem Crown Attorney with the Ministry of the Attorney General in Ottawa. She is a member of the Alternative Dispute Resolution Institute of Ontario (ADRIO) and has a Certificate from the Program on Negotiation Master Class at Harvard University (2017). Rebecca received her Ph.D. in 2015 from the Carleton University Department of Law and Legal Studies, and was the first ever graduate of that program. She was awarded a Carleton Senate Medal as well as the 2015 CLSA Graduate Student Essay Prize for her graduate work. Rebecca also has an LL.M. and LL.B., received from Queen’s University in 2002 and 2001 respectively, and holds a Graduate Certificate in Women’s Studies from the University of Cincinnati.

In addition to her several years teaching at the University of Ottawa’s Faculty of Law, Rebecca has taught at the University of Western Ontario’s Faculty of Law, and at the University of Cincinnati. She has also been a columnist for the Lawyers Weekly and has authored and co-authored several legal textbooks for students and legal system practitioners, including lawyers, paralegals and police. Rebecca has been an Ontario lawyer for over sixteen years. She worked in private practice from 2003 – 2009, starting at a large firm, doing a wide range of litigation work. She also worked for six years as Staff Lawyer, Law Reform and Equality, to the Canadian Bar Association, then as a Policy Counsel with the Federation of Law Societies of Canada. Rebecca is a co-editor of Robson Hall Law School’s criminal law and justice blog: robsoncrim.com and is a research associate with the UK’s Restorative Justice for All Institute.

Lecture 16
The Conscious Mind
Lecturer: Misha Sokolov

Consciousness is the mysterious quality that turns an object into a subject: the me into I. However, in our secular age of reductionist empiricism, consciousness is equated with awareness. In serious scientific circles, the topic is taboo by virtue of silence, for fear of association with New-Age Mysticism. In this lecture, we will take a “philosophy of cognition” approach to understanding consciousness. We will attempt to define consciousness and its relation to cutting-edge research in cognitive science. We will also address scientifically viable theories that attempt to explain the thinking and feeling subject that each one of us is.

Lecture, discussion, visual presentation, and film clips

  • Day: Tuesday, October 23rd
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Misha Sokolov received his undergraduate degree from University of Ottawa in Psychology, where his research focused on emotional perception and emotional mimicry in the non-suicidal self injury population. Following that, Misha completed the Master of Cognitive Science program at Carleton University, focusing on emotional language production in the psychopathic population. He is currently a PhD candidate in the Department of Psychology at Carleton University, where his research is focused on the linguistic and para-linguistic factors that allow individuals to manipulate others. Aside from research, Misha takes immense meaning from teaching mini-enrichment courses for Ottawa area high school students; and has a deep personal interest in philosophy of psychology, and philosophy of science.

Lecture 17
Welcome to Romania!
Lecturer: Dr. Ioana Dimitriu

Welcome to Romania! Designed as a virtual trip to Romania, this workshop offers an overview of some of the landmarks of this Eastern European country, while focusing on the diverse cultural traditions and on some of the historical and geographical aspects that make for the uniqueness and the richness of this “Island of Latinity”. Participants will also be introduced to some common expressions that can be used when communicating with Romanian friends in the community or when travelling to Romania.

Lecture, discussion, visual presentation, and film clips

  • Day: Tuesday, October 23rd
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Ioana Dimitriu holds a PhD in Spanish Literature and an MA in Spanish Comparative Linguistics from the University of Ottawa (2010; 2002). Her Doctoral dissertation focused on the figure of the labyrinth as a literary metaphor in the fantastic prose by Argentine author Jorge Luis Borges, and by Romanian historian of religions Mircea Eliade. She worked as an Assistant to the Ambassador of Argentina to Canada, and as a Spanish Sessional Lecturer at the University of Ottawa (2001-2008) and at Carleton University (2010 – 2017). In addition, Ioana has several years of experience teaching Spanish to adults who learn the language for travel purposes. Ioana’s personal interests include studying theology, exploring other cultures through reading and travel, and kayaking on Loon Lake in South-Eastern Ontario.

NEW!

Lecture 17b
Fifty Years of Darkness: Why We STILL Don’t Know What the Universe is Made of
Lecturer: Dr. Peter Watson

In the late 1960s it became clear there was a lot of material in galaxies that we could not identify. It became known generically as “Dark Matter”.  This lecture will include the story of how Vera Rubin and her group started the controversy, and how physicists and astronomers scrambled to explain the observations. In the years since then, our understanding of what it is NOT has become much more precise, but unfortunately that only deepens the mystery. And then Dark Energy came along to further confuse us!

Lecture and visual presentation

  • Day: Wednesday, October 24th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture poster

Lecturer biography: Peter Watson learned physics and math at Edinburgh and Durham universities, and joined Carleton University in 1974, becoming chair of the Physics Department and then Dean of Science. He has worked at CERN in Switzerland, Oxford and Edinburgh Universities, and spent two years in Nigeria. In addition to a 40 year research career in theoretical physics, he has taught a wide variety of courses at all levels, many involving innovative teaching methods. Although he retired in June 2008, he has continued to teach, give public lectures and do research.

Lecture 18
The Human Microbiome and How It Affects Health
Lecturer: Dr. Nafisa Jadavji

Recent studies have reported that the human microbiome, an integral internal ecosystem of microorganisms, may play a significant role in human health. This lecture will introduce participants to the human microbiome and how it is linked to human health. For example, how does the microbiome interact with brain, cardiovascular, and immune functions? The lecture will end with an exploration of how the microbiome impacts different diseases such as neurodegeneration, cancer, diabetes, and obesity.

Lecture, visual presentation, and film clips

  • Day: Wednesday, October 24th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Dr. Nafisa M. Jadavji is a neuroscientist. Currently, she is postdoctoral fellow researcher and instructor at Carleton University and the University of Ottawa, in Ottawa, Canada. She completed her doctoral training at McGill University in Montréal, Canada and postdoctoral training at the Charité Medical University in Berlin, Germany. Her post-doctoral research focuses on understanding how dietary and genetic deficiencies in one carbon metabolism affect neurological function over the lifespan, using a mouse model. Her research has been published in Behavioural Brain Research, Biochemical Journal, Neuroendocrinology, Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, Human Molecular Genetics, European Journal of Neuroscience, Journal of Pediatric Reviews, Neural Regeneration Research, Environmental Epigenetics, Neurobiology of disease, and Neuroscience. Dr. Jadavji has been funded by the Federation of European Neuroscience Society (Europe), NeuroWIND (Germany), Canadian Association for Neuroscience, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, National Science & Engineering Research Council (Canada), International Brain Research Organization, Parkinson’s Disease Foundation (US), Burroughs Wellcome Fund (US) and Fonds de la recherché en santé Québec (Canada). She is a regular reviewer for the Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, Neurotoxicity Research, Journal of Molecular Medicine and Neuroscience. Currently, Dr. Jadavji is an Editorial member for Updates in Nutritional Disorders and Therapy and JSM Nutritional Disorders Journals. She is also the Chair of the Board of Directors for the Journal of Young Investigators (JYI) and a board member of the Canadian Society for Molecular Biosciences.

Lecture 19
The Art of Jazz Singing (Section II: repeat performance of Section I)
Lecturer: Dr. Diane Nalini

Join jazz singer and songwriter Diane Nalini for an entertaining and engaging exploration of the art of jazz singing. With examples from Bessie Smith, Ella Fitzgerald, Nat King Cole, Sarah Vaughan, Billie Holiday, and others, she will provide insights into what made these singers so unique. Diane will also do live demonstrations, so participants will come away with a better understanding of different approaches to phrasing, interpreting a song, and interacting with musicians. (Note: Section I and Section II of this lecture presentation contain the same content)

Lecture, film clips, and short performances

  • Day: Wednesday, October 24th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Note: this lecture is a repeat offering; read a review and interview at Apt613, and read what earlier participants had to say:
    • “Diane Nalini demonstrated particular aspects of various singers’ jazz artistry and brought her points across with concrete and specific details. I heard nuances in various singers’ styles that I had never heard before. Brava!”
    • “Nalini’s engagement with the audience, and her superb vocals, aided her demonstrations of jazz singing. She’s a very good teacher.”
    • “Diane’s enthusiasm for her subject was infectious. Her own vocal demonstrations were lovely to listen to, but also very instructive.”
    • “Diane was warm, passionate about her subject and had a good sense of humour. She was also obviously knowledgeable about her subject.”
  • Lecture Poster

Lecturer biography: Singer/songwriter Diane Nalini composes and sings in four languages. She has been a professional jazz singer for over 25 years and has recorded and produced four critically-acclaimed albums. She has sung at jazz festivals around the globe, and given gala performances for President Bill Clinton and Sir Paul McCartney. She was nominated for the Grand Prix de Jazz General Motors at the 2002 Montreal International Jazz Festival and was one of two finalists for the UK’s Young Jazz Vocalist of the Year awards for 2001. Diane’s original songs have also been featured in television, independent films, as well as the Hollywood movie “Charlotte Grey” starring Cate Blanchett, which featured her song “L’amour d’autrefois”, co-written with UK arranger/composer Dick Walter. Diane is also the resident vocalist with the Ottawa Jazz Orchestra and sings regularly with them at the National Arts Centre.

For more information, other press reviews and to listen to Diane’s music, please visit: dianenalini.com.

Lecture 20
(re)Conciliation in Haudenosaunee Culture and Practice
Lecturer: Dr. Kahente Horn-Miller

In order to “redress the legacy of residential schools and advance the process of Canadian reconciliation”, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission made 94 Calls to Action. As a result, we are all asking ourselves, what does reconciliation mean? What does it look like? Indigenous peoples are also asking the same questions, and find ourselves tasked with defining it in our own ways from our own cultural perspectives. This talk is about (re)conciliation from a Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) perspective. We will take an illustrated and narrative journey, through the visual history and meaning of conciliation in the signs and symbols of Haudenosaunee culture.

Lecture and visual presentation

  • Day: Thursday, October 25th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Dr. Kahente Horn-Miller (Kahente means “she walks ahead”) (Kanien:keha’ka/Mohawk) received her doctorate in 2009. She is a mother to four daughters. Currently she is an Assistant Professor in the School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies at Carleton University. As an active member of her community, Dr. Horn-Miller is a figurative bridge builder as she continues to research and write on issues that are relevant to her work and academic interests such as Indigenous methodologies, Indigenous women, identity politics, colonization, Indigenous governance, and consensus-based decision making for her community and the wider society. Her governance work and community-based research involves interpreting Haudenosaunee culture and bringing new life to old traditions. She continues to work with the research advisory for the Kahnawà:ke Diabetes Prevention Project, along with writing and publishing in her areas of interest. It is the fruit of her endeavors as a Mohawk, an educator, and a mother that she brings into her interactions with Kahnawà:ke:ronon (people of Kahnawà:ke) and the academic community. Academics for her is not only about theorizing the issues that Indigenous peoples face as a way to find solutions; it is also about putting these theories into practice. It is through her teaching that she challenges her students to learn about her culture and about themselves as humans, which in the long term will foster relationships between Indigenous and non-native peoples that will go beyond the written word and the classroom and research settings. 

Lecture 21
Ottawa Architectural Landscape: Exploring Prosperity and Memory through Built Heritage 
Lecturer: Emily Guy

From majestic hotels to the development of the parliamentary precinct and the mid-century-modern construction boom, Ottawa’s landscape has seen an evolution of interesting architectural styles. In examining several key sites in the city, the goal of this lecture is to explore how Ottawa’s built heritage tells a story of prosperity and expansion, but also of loss. In addition to the history and architectural character of these buildings, this lecture will touch on the impact of the 1950 Greber Plan on Ottawa’s landscape, specifically on the neighbourhoods that surround these iconic spaces, as well as the buildings, homes, and communities that have since disappeared.

Lecture, discussion, and visual presentation

  • Day: Thursday, October 25th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Emily Guy holds a BA in Canadian Studies (McGill), an MA in History (Memorial) and an MEd in Teaching and Learning (University of Ottawa). She has extensive experience in research and writing, specifically in the field of public memory and commemoration. Her research interests have stemmed from her experience living in Montreal, St. John’s, and in Ottawa – especially with respect to how culture and identity influence how history is taught and perceived. Emily is an enthusiastic and energetic instructor, with a keen interest in discussion and individuals’ stories. Currently, she is working as a Operations and Research Coordinator at an Architecture Firm in Ottawa, specializing in heritage restoration, urbanism and conservation.

Lecture 22
Theology in Colour: Introduction to Byzantine Iconography
Lecturer: Dr. Ioana Dimitriu

This lecture offers an overview of the history, the content, the style, and the meaning of icons in the Orthodox Christian traditions. What are Byzantine icons? What are the differences between Western and Eastern iconography? This lecture is intended for people who wish to get acquainted with Byzantine icons, as they prepare for travel to ancient Christian sites in Eastern Europe or in the Middle East, or for those who wish to discover and appreciate the colourful treasures hidden in over one dozen Eastern Christian churches in the Ottawa Valley.

Lecture, discussion, visual presentation, and film clips

  • Day: Thursday, October 25th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Ioana Dimitriu holds a PhD in Spanish Literature and an MA in Spanish Comparative Linguistics from the University of Ottawa (2010; 2002). Her Doctoral dissertation focused on the figure of the labyrinth as a literary metaphor in the fantastic prose by Argentine author Jorge Luis Borges, and by Romanian historian of religions Mircea Eliade. She worked as an Assistant to the Ambassador of Argentina to Canada, and as a Spanish Sessional Lecturer at the University of Ottawa (2001-2008) and at Carleton University (2010 – 2017). In addition, Ioana has several years of experience teaching Spanish to adults who learn the language for travel purposes. Ioana’s personal interests include studying theology, exploring other cultures through reading and travel, and kayaking on Loon Lake in South-Eastern Ontario.

Lecture 23
War Art or War Memorial? What Exactly is Canada’s War Art?
Lecturer: Dr. Laura Brandon

The Canadian War Museum possesses one of the finest twentieth-century official war art collections in the world. Until relatively recently, however, the collection has received limited public attention. This lecture explores Canada’s official First World War art as art history and war memorial. Better known and recognized as an accessible and meaningful visual record of the conflict, over the past 100 years Canada’s official war art has struggled to retain any substantive position in Canadian art history. Does it matter?

Lecture and visual presentation

  • Day: Monday, October 29th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Laura Brandon is a freelance writer, curator, and lecturer specializing in international and Canadian war art. She has a PhD in History from Carleton University (2002), an MA in Art History from Queen’s University (1992), and a BA (Honours) in European History and Art History from the University of Bristol, UK (1973). From 1992 to 2015, she was the Historian, Art & War at the Canadian War Museum. She has written and lectured internationally for nearly 40 years and curated more than 45 exhibitions. She is the author of two books on war art. Currently an Adjunct Research Professor in the School for Studies in Art and Culture and in the History Department at Carleton University, she was appointed to the Order of Canada in 2015.