Fall 2019 Single Lecture Presentations

The Fall 2019 Single Lecture Presentations will offer our largest collection of single daytime and evening lectures to date, spread throughout the months of September and October. We hope the wide selection of topics and dates will ensure there is something of interest for everyone.

Below you’ll find lecture times, dates, descriptions and lecturer biography details. Alternatively, you can also view a PDF version of Learning in Retirement Fall 2019 Single Lecture Presentations Brochure.

Registration for the Fall 2019 Single Lecture Presentations is now open! Please visit our registration page to register now.

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Single Lecture Presentations

1. Why Crosswords are NOT Helping you Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease (September 16)
2. Ottawa as Crown and Town: A Walking Tour of the Monuments of Elgin Street (September 17)
3. Five Fascinating Muslim Queens (September 18)
4. Music for Curious Ears: An Introduction to Unusual Musical Equipment (September 19)
5. Gallery Tour: Portraiture (September 19) – Lecture Full, Waitlist Open
6. Religion and Politics, in Canada and the United States (September 23)
7. Building on Words; Words on Buildings (September 24)
8. A Women’s Tour of Ottawa (September 25)
9. Front-row Seats at a Canadian Space Launch in Kazakhstan (September 25)
10. Forced Migration: Understanding the Global Refugee Crisis (September 26)
11. Mercy, the Afterlife, and the End of Capital Punishment in Canada (September 30)
12. Out of Alabama: From America Enslavement to Freedom and Exile in Africa (October 1)
13. How to Read the Landscape (October 2) – Lecture Full, Waitlist Open
14. Marihuana: Is It High Times or Is It Keep Off the Grass (October 3)
15. Gallery Tour: “My Kid Could Do That!” The Perils of Abstraction (October 3) – Lecture Full, Waitlist Open
16. Climate Change as an Ethical Dilemma (October 7)
17. Populism’s Appeal and Impact (October 8)
18. Brexit: Causes and Consequences (October 9) – Lecture Full, Waitlist Open
19. Wish Upon a Falling Star: Meteors and Meteorites (October 10)
20. The Power of 0 and 1 (October 15)
21. Fragile States and Transnational Terrorism (October 16)
22. How Canadians are Conquering the Ballet World (October 17)
23. NEW DATE! Gallery Tour: Saints and Sinners (October 10) – Lecture Full, Waitlist Open
24. You Can Learn to Read Russian! (October 21)
25. Iran’s Political System and the Making of Foreign Policy (October 22)
26. Deep Underground, Looking for Dark Matter (October 22)
27. Bad Movie Physics (October 23)
28. Democracy and Rule of Law Now (October 23)
29. Music and Technology (October 24)
30. The Remarkable Cultural Impact of the Haitian Revolution (October 24)
31. The Jazz Fusion Era (October 28)
32. How Real is a Real Number? (October 29) 


Lecture 1
Why Crosswords are NOT Helping you Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease
Lecturer: Ashley Thompson

Can brain exercises “keep your brain young”? This lecture will first cover the basics of how memory works in the brain, and Alzheimer’s disease pathology (i.e., what is going on in the brain in this disease). It will then explain why tasks such as completing crossword puzzles are not ideal for promoting mental fitness. We will discuss some of the most up-to-date advances in the area of Alzheimer’s disease research, as well as informed advice for protecting our ageing brains against disease.

  • Day: Monday, September 16
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Ashley Thompson is a senior doctoral student in the Neuroscience department at Carleton University. While completing her PhD research, Ashley works as a contract instructor in the Neuroscience department, teaching Introduction to Neurological Disease in both the fall and winter terms this year.Ashley began her PhD in Neuroscience at Carleton in 2013, working under the supervision of Dr. Shawn Hayley. Her research focuses on Parkinson’s disease (PD), and seeks to understand how we might be able to alter the environment of the regions known to be vulnerable in PD using substances that occur naturally in the brain. Read what LinR participants have said about Ashley Thompson.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019


Lecture 2

Ottawa as Crown and Town: A Walking Tour of the Monuments of Elgin Street
Lecturer: Dr. Tonya Davidson

During his tenure as Prime Minister, Mackenzie King imagined Ottawa’s Elgin Street as the Canadian Champs-Élysées. The National War Memorial was unveiled in 1939 at Elgin Street’s northern apex, to create a sort of Canadian Arc de Triomphe. Since then, Elgin Street visitors can walk through dominant narratives of the nation; however, the street and its monuments also allow for the undoing of these same narratives. We will visit monuments along Elgin Street (including the Oscar Peterson statue, the Canadian Tribute to Human Rights, and Enclave: The Women’s Monument) to explore how they allow for the generation of multiple sets of memories, nostalgia, and challenges to nationalist narratives. Note: this is the same tour as the last week of the Ottawology series that ran in Spring 2019.

  • Day: Tuesday, September 17
  • Time: 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableLocation: National War Memorial
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 30 participants
  • Note: Completion of a liability waiver is required
  • Meeting place: National War Memorial

Picture of LinR Lecturer Dr. Tonya DavidsonLecturer biography: Tonya Davidson is an Instructor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Carleton University. Her research interests have focused on questions of memory, national belonging, and the built environment. More specifically, Tonya has spent many years studying the social lives of statues in Ottawa. Her sociological research has been published in Journal of Canadian Studies, Space and Culture, The Public Historian, and Topia. With Ondine Park, she co-edited Ecologies of Affect: Placing Nostalgia, Desire, and Hope (2011, Wilfrid Laurier University Press). She is currently working with Ondine Park on a co-edited book for sociology students, called Seasonal Sociology (University of Toronto Press, forthcoming). In her free time she likes to give walking tours of Ottawa with Ottawa Detours.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 3
Five Fascinating Muslim Queens
Lecturer: H. Masud Taj

Together with Taj, consider these five fascinating Muslim queens: from rags to the richest woman in the world in 8th century Baghdad; the first woman to occupy the throne of Egypt after Cleopatra in 13th century Cairo, and her contemporary in Delhi who continues to be the subject of Bollywood films and TV mini-series eight centuries later; the emigrant who becomes a queen in 16th century Morocco, and her contemporary, the girl from Ukraine that defied royal traditions in Istanbul. In recent years countries such as Bangladesh, Indonesia, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Mali, Mauritius, Northern Cyprus, Pakistan, Senegal, Singapore and Turkey have continued the tradition with Muslim women as head of state or government.

  • Day: Wednesday, September 18
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 40 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer H. Masud TajLecturer biography: H. Masud Taj, award-winning Adjunct Professor of Architecture & Urbanism at Carleton University, was mentored by the leading exponent of Islamic Architecture, Hassan Fathy in Egypt. He delivered the Keynote at the Second International Conference of Islamic Art and Architecture. Engaging the Other (Macmillan) featured his research in Spain, which was also showcased by Carleton University’s Faculty of Public Affairs and at Author Meets Readers: Ottawa International Writers Festival. His books are archived in Carleton University’s Special Collections and one is inducted to the Library of Parliament.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 4
Music for Curious Ears: An Introduction to Unusual Musical Equipment
Lecturer: Dr. Jesse Stewart

Have you ever wondered what instrument makes the spooky sound in horror movies? Or what a flute made out of 50,000 year old wood sounds like? Join Juno award-winning composer/percussionist—and Carleton University professor—Dr. Jesse Stewart for a discussion and demonstration of a wide variety of unusual musical instruments that he has collected throughout his career. This interactive lecture will take place at the Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre.

  • Day: Thursday, September 19
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableLocation: Woodside Hall, Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre (355 Cooper Street)
  • Fee: FREE (Registration Required)
  • Enrollment capacity: 120 participants

Lecturer biography: Carleton University music professor Jesse Stewart is an award-winning composer, percussionist, artist, and educator. His music has been documented on over twenty recordings including Stretch Orchestra’s self-titled debut album, which was honoured with the 2012 “Instrumental Album of the Year” JUNO award. He has performed and recorded with musical luminaries from around the world, and has been widely commissioned as a composer and artist. OttawaJazzScene.ca has described him as “one of the most innovative musicians in Canada.” See more of Jesse’s work in this documentary and on his website.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 5
Gallery Tour: Portraiture – Lecture Full, Waitlist Open
Lecturer: Maria Martin

The way we present ourselves, or choose to be portrayed, can be very revealing. Join us in the European and Canadian galleries of the National Gallery of Canada, to view how artists have captured themselves and their subjects in sculpture, painting and photography. We will learn about the artists and the times in which they lived. We will also reflect on what the person in the portrait may have been trying to communicate. This single lecture is excerpted from Maria’s “Learning to Look at the Gallery” series.

  • Day: Thursday, September 19
  • Time: 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableLocation: National Gallery of Canada
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
    • Free entrance to the National Gallery on Thursday evenings
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Note: Meet at the National Gallery front entrance

Picture of LinR lecturer Maria MartinLecturer biography: Maria Martin has studied and worked in the Arts for many years. She holds a Master’s Degree in the History of Art from Queen’s University, and a Bachelor’s Degree in Art History from Carleton University. Currently a Manager with the federal government, Maria previously worked at the Canada Council for the Arts as an Art Consultant at the Council’s Art Bank, and as an Education Officer and Guide at the National Gallery of Canada.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 6
Religion and Politics, in Canada and the United States
Lecturer: Dr. Tom Sherwood

With federal elections in Canada this year and in the United States in 2020, we are aware of religious groups and values in public and political discourse. The religious history and make-up of the two countries are somewhat similar, and yet religion seems to function quite differently in the public life of Canada and the United States. (“God Keep Our Land” vs. In God We Trust.”) How can we understand this better? What are the key distinctions in our histories and constitutions? How can we anticipate the role of religion in the future of each country?

  • Day: Monday, September 23
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Tom SherwoodLecturer biography: Tom Sherwood has two sets of professional credentials. As an ordained United Church minister, he had a full-time clergy career in parish and campus ministry (including as Carleton University Chaplain, 1999-2009). As a part-time university teacher since 1982, he has taught courses in anthropology, sociology, and religion at Carleton and Saint Paul University, from first year to MA levels, usually with an emphasis on Canadian history and society. He has an MA in Canadian Studies in addition to a PhD in Sociology, and another Masters in Theology. His research has been published in a book, and several articles and book chapters, and presented in documentary theatre projects.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 7
Building on Words; Words on Buildings
Lecturer: H. Masud Taj

As an architectural calligrapher, Taj pursues the Masonry Script (Arabic medieval modular calligraphy). He will show two examples of his three-dimensional calligraphy along with their polyhedral and philosophical underpinning. The two examples of his calligraphy will explain the twin obsessions of the Muslim civilization: architecture and calligraphy. He will also present his research from one summer in Andalusian Spain, reading Don Quixote while reading inscriptions on a medieval mosque, church and synagogue in Toledo. No previous knowledge of architecture, calligraphy or polyhedra are required to enjoy the session.

  • Day: Tuesday, September 24
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 40 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer H. Masud TajLecturer biography: H. Masud Taj, award-winning Adjunct Professor of Architecture & Urbanism at Carleton University, was mentored by the leading exponent of Islamic Architecture, Hassan Fathy in Egypt. He delivered the Keynote at the Second International Conference of Islamic Art and Architecture. Engaging the Other (Macmillan) featured his research in Spain, which was also showcased by Carleton University’s Faculty of Public Affairs and at Author Meets Readers: Ottawa International Writers Festival. His books are archived in Carleton University’s Special Collections and one is inducted to the Library of Parliament.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 8
A Women’s Tour of Ottawa
Lecturer: Dr. Tonya Davidson

Beginning at the Centennial Flame on Parliament Hill, on this walking tour we address how women have historically been imagined in relation to nation-building in Canada. The tour progresses along Elgin Street, for a sociological reading of how mundane but crucial urban infrastructure, such as public transportation, parks, and public washrooms, are gendered in their design and use. Stopping at the National War Memorial, the National Arts Centre, City Hall, and various monuments, we will discuss the feminization of poverty and homelessness, homophobia, women’s role in municipal politics, housing, violence against women, and Ottawa feminisms.

  • Day: Wednesday, September 25
  • Time: 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableLocation: Parliament Hill
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 30 participants
  • Note: Completion of a liability waiver is required
  • Meeting place: Centennial Flame on Parliament Hill

Picture of LinR Lecturer Dr. Tonya DavidsonLecturer biography: Tonya Davidson is an Instructor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Carleton University. Her research interests have focused on questions of memory, national belonging, and the built environment. More specifically, Tonya has spent many years studying the social lives of statues in Ottawa. Her sociological research has been published in Journal of Canadian Studies, Space and Culture, The Public Historian, and Topia. With Ondine Park, she co-edited Ecologies of Affect: Placing Nostalgia, Desire, and Hope (2011, Wilfrid Laurier University Press). She is currently working with Ondine Park on a co-edited book for sociology students, called Seasonal Sociology (University of Toronto Press, forthcoming). In her free time she likes to give walking tours of Ottawa with Ottawa Detours.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 9
Front-row Seats at a Canadian Space Launch in Kazakhstan
Lecturer: Elizabeth Howell

Spend an evening with space and science journalist Elizabeth Howell, following along with the launch preparations of Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques in Baikonur, Kazakhstan as he got ready for his launch to the International Space Station. Howell’s on-site photography will show Saint-Jacques’ final steps before going to space in December 2018. Then NASA photography will carry on his adventures in space, which ended with a safe landing in Kazakhstan in June 2019. We will also discuss how the Space Station shaped Canada’s space program, and the history of the formerly top-secret Baikonur Cosmodrome.

  • Day: Wednesday, September 25
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Elizabeth Howell is a space and science journalist based in Ottawa. To better understand what it’s like to be an astronaut, she’s watched five rocket launches in person (including two in Kazakhstan), lived on a simulated Mars base for two weeks, and is close to completing a PhD about astronaut communication. Her work has appeared in outlets such as CBC News, Space.com, Sky&Telescope, Astronomy and Forbes. She teaches part-time at several Ottawa universities and community colleges. Elizabeth is also president of Science Writers and Communicators of Canada, a non-profit group devoted to increasing science communication literacy. She is writing two books.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 10
Forced Migration: Understanding the Global Refugee Crisis
Lecturer: Dr. Joseph Landry

With 70+ million people displaced worldwide, we see tensions between human rights and the domestic, regional, and international politics surrounding internally displaced persons and asylum seekers. Examples include sprawling refugee camps in Africa and Asia, the plight of so-called “boat people” seeking refuge in Europe and North America, and hot button political controversies surrounding asylum seekers in the global North. This lecture will clarify terms and address the major themes and tensions that currently affect the global refugee crisis. We will also apply these concepts to contemporary political situations, examining the difficulties of ensuring refugees’ protection while balancing concerns around national security.

  • Day: Thursday, September 26
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Picture of LinR lectuer Dr. Joseph LandryLecturer biography: Joe Landry is currently Senior Analyst and Bureau Coordinator with the Peace and Stabilization Operations Program (PSOPs) at Global Affairs Canada, responsible for the coordination and development of the PSOPs 2019-2022 Strategy and for the priority country selection process. He also is an adjunct lecturer at Carleton University. Joe holds a PhD in International Conflict Analysis and Management from the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs at Carleton University. He was recently named as a fellow at the Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies (MIGS).

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 11
Mercy, the Afterlife, and the End of Capital Punishment in Canada
Lecturer: Dr. Joel Kropf

In the 1960s and 1970s, Canadian authorities decided to eliminate the death penalty, a longstanding feature of criminal justice. Why did abolition finally occur in this particular period? This lecture will explore one dimension of the explanation by stepping back into the mid-1800s to examine public executions, events in which we can see perhaps surprising motifs of mercy and forgiveness, and a tendency to highlight the humanity of the convict. We will then discuss the 1960s to discover how changed sensibilities about mercy, and altered assumptions about death and the afterlife, helped to end the death penalty in Canada.

  • Day: Monday, September 30
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Joel Kropf is a historical researcher and a contract instructor in the Department of Law and Legal Studies at Carleton University. He obtained a PhD in 2015 from Carleton’s Department of History, completing a dissertation on the ethical thought of Canadian penal reformers in the first two thirds of the twentieth century. He previously wrote an MA thesis on the Canadian debate over the abolition of the death penalty in the 1960s and 1970s.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 12
Out of Alabama: From American Enslavement to Freedom and Exile in Africa
Lecturer: Dr. James Miller and Dr. Mary Margaret Johnston-Miller

This is the story of Harrison Ellis. As an enslaved blacksmith in Alabama, Ellis taught himself to read and write. His advanced literacy and devout Christianity came to the attention of the Presbyterian Church, which took the extraordinary step of purchasing Ellis, ordaining him as a minister, and sending him to Liberia as a missionary. From there, things started to go terribly wrong, as we shall see. The lecture tells a fascinating tale of one person’s extraordinary life. Ellis’ life also illuminates the larger questions of American slavery and abolition that dominated the times in which he lived.

  • Day: Tuesday, October 1
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: James Miller is an Associate Professor in the Department of History at Carleton University. He teaches courses on US history, slavery and abolition, and the history of Madness. His PhD dissertation, subsequently published, was on the mass westward movement of slaves and slaveholders. His research and teaching interests include the plantation society of the American South and the colonization movement that established Liberia as a new ‘home’ for free and emancipated African Americans.

A more recent interest is the history of outsider art, also known as art brut, especially the art work of psychiatric patients. He is currently working with Mary Margaret Johnston-Miller, historian and art archivist at Library and Archives Canada, researching the history of the Art Extraordinary Collection, located in Glasgow, an important Scottish collection of such work.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 13
How to Read the Landscape – Lecture Full, Waitlist Open
Lecturer: Dr. Elena Ponomarenko

During this field trip to the woods and meadows of the Stony Swamp conservation area, you will learn how to “read” the landscape, and detect what has disturbed it. We will discuss unique geological features and soils, and analyze traces of fires, hurricanes, tornadoes, insect infestation, and past anthropogenic disturbances such as logging and farming. By the end of our eco-forensic class you will be able to recognize traces of past disturbances along your hiking routes, in your own woodlot or backyard, and even on some landscape paintings! Finally, you will learn how adults of all ages can use these skills to contribute to a citizen science project.

  • Day: Wednesday, October 2
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Stony Swamp Conservation, 4897 Old Richmond Rd (Ottawa West)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 18 participants
  • Note: Completion of a liability waiver is required, and please wear comfortable shoes, socks and long pants to protect against ticks.

Lecturer biography: Dr. Elena Ponomarenko is a consulting soil scientist at Ecosystem Archaeology Services and a part-time professor at the University of Ottawa and Carleton University. She received her education in the Lomonossov State University in Moscow, Russia, and conducted her research globe-wide. Her research and teaching are focused on developing methods of disturbance history reconstruction. All major disturbances, such as extreme windstorms, fires, floods, and herbivory leave traces in the soil; Elena’s eco-forensic methods allow to decipher these traces through the soil analysis. Recently, she initiated a citizen science project “Mapping the Wind”, aiming to trace and map past hurricane tracks in Eastern Canada.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 14
Marihuana: Is It High Times or Is It Keep Off the Grass?
Lecturer: Dr. Peter Fried

Since Canada recently legalized marihuana (only the second country in the world to do so), interest in objective information on “weed” has naturally soared dramatically. In this lecture, topics that will be discussed include the chemistry of the plant, how the brain is impacted to produce the high, use during vulnerable nervous system developmental periods such as pregnancy and adolescence, medical attributes, and the legal status in Canada and the United States. Information garnered from this lecture will help you make both an informed decision for yourself and to discuss this controversial topic with family and friends.

  • Day: Thursday, October 3
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Picture of LinR Lecturer Peter FriedLecturer biography: Peter Fried is a Distinguished Research Professor and Professor Emeritus of Carleton University’s Psychology department. His more than three decades of teaching includes introductory psychology, neuropsychology, perception and sensation, and physiological psychology. He has also taught in the Learning in Retirement program for several years and, recently, has lectured on cruise ships. He is the director of an investigation, initiated in 1978, of the neurobehavioral consequences of marihuana use during pregnancy upon offspring. The findings are the most widely cited in the marihuana-pregnancy scientific literature and have resulted in numerous awards and invitations to lecture around the world. He has worked with numerous international neuropsychologists and will couple this collaboration with his own research and teaching experience in the Learning in Retirement program.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 15
Gallery Tour: “My Kid Could Do That! The Perils of Abstraction – Lecture Full, Waitlist Open
Lecturer: Maria Martin

When Barnett Newman’s “Voice of Fire” painting was purchased and exhibited in the National Gallery of Canada after the building opened in 1988, a storm of controversy ensued. What is it about abstract art that infuriates the public? How do we approach works of art that seem so simple, and not wonder whether the artist is “having us on”? We will visit the National Gallery to look at abstract paintings and sculptures from the early 20th century to the present day, to consider the artist’s message and its meaning for us. This single lecture is excerpted from Maria’s “Learning to Look at the Gallery” series.

  • Day: Thursday, October 3
  • Time: 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableLocation: National Gallery of Canada
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
    • Free entrance to the National Gallery on Thursday evenings
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Note: Meet at the National Gallery front entrance

Picture of LinR lecturer Maria MartinLecturer biography: Maria Martin has studied and worked in the Arts for many years. She holds a Master’s Degree in the History of Art from Queen’s University, and a Bachelor’s Degree in Art History from Carleton University. Currently a Manager with the federal government, Maria previously worked at the Canada Council for the Arts as an Art Consultant at the Council’s Art Bank, and as an Education Officer and Guide at the National Gallery of Canada.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 16
Climate Change as an Ethical Dilemma
Lecturer: Dr. Nalini Ramlakhan

This lecture explores the ethical aspects of climate change, something often considered a political or economic issue. Should developed nations cut back their greenhouse gas emissions in order to allow developing countries to develop and not harm the environment in doing so? What responsibilities do we have to future generations in mitigating climate change? What are some moral obligations or ethical duties that we can provide as solutions to mitigate climate change? Discover what prominent ethicists have to say about the issue. Through this example of climate change, you’ll also experience a philosophical approach to ethical dilemmas.

  • Day: Monday, October 7
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Nalini Ramlakhan has been lecturing at Carleton University since 2013. She teaches in the philosophy department and at the institute of cognitive science. She has an MA in philosophy, with a focus on ethical and moral decision-making, and a PhD in cognitive science, with a focus on moral psychology, examining the motivation behind moral decisions. Recently, Nalini has shifted her focus in research from moral psychology to ethics and public policy in climate change, using some of her research in decision-making to approach issues in climate ethics. She enjoys teaching, and often attends teaching workshops at Carleton’s Educational Development Centre to broaden her skills and understand new and creative approaches to teaching.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 17
Populism’s Appeal and Impact
Lecturer: Dr. Milana Nikolko

Why does populism resonate today? Social turbulence, economic crises, and migration are all believed to fuel populist resentment against political and economic elites. This lecture will address the appeal of populism, as well as why some consider it a threat to democracy. Together we will explore the transformation of populism over the course of the 20th century in order to understand its modern variants, its contexts, and its impact on political discourse today.

  • Day: Tuesday, October 8
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer Milana NikolkoLecturer biography: Milana Nikolko, PhD, is an adjunct professor at the Institute of European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (EURUS), Carleton University. From 2005 to 2014 she was associate Professor of Political Science (Docent) at V.I. Vernadsky Taurida National University (Ukraine), and in 2008 was appointed as visiting professor in the Political Science Department, Valdosta State University (USA).Dr. Nikolko is co-editor of Post-Soviet Migration and Diasporas: From Global Perspectives to Everyday Practices (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017). Her fields of interest include research on Ukraine’s national building process, mediation of grey zone conflicts, political narratives of victimization among ethnic groups, migration and diasporas in post-Soviet space, and research on social capital and diaspora networks.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 18
Brexit: Causes and Consequences – Lecture Full, Waitlist Open
Lecturer: Dr. André Lecours

The exit of the United Kingdom (UK) from the European Union (EU) represents one of the most significant political events of the early 21st century. How and why did the United Kingdom vote to leave the EU? What will be the impact of Brexit on the EU? On the UK? This lecture will tackle these questions. It first examines the origins and workings of the EU, and its relationship with the UK. Then, the lecture analyzes the immediate causes of the Brexit referendum, the results of the vote, the subsequent negotiations, and its impact on the EU and UK.

  • Day: Wednesday, October 9
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: André Lecours is Professor in the School of Political Studies at the University of Ottawa. He holds a PhD from Carleton University (2001). His main research interests are Canadian politics, European politics, nationalism (with a focus on Quebec, Scotland, Flanders, Catalonia and the Basque country) and federalism. He is the editor of New Institutionalism. Theory and Analysis published by the University of Toronto Press in 2005, the author of Basque Nationalism and the Spanish State (University of Nevada Press, 2007), the co-author (with Daniel Béland) of Nationalism and Social Policy. The Politics of Territorial Solidarity (Oxford University Press, 2008); and the co-author (with Daniel Béland, Gregory Marchildon, Haizhen Mou and Rose Olfert) of Fiscal Federalism and Equalization Policy in Canada. Political and Economic Dimensions (University of Toronto Press, 2017).

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 19
Wish Upon a Falling Star: Meteors and Meteorites
Lecturer: Howard Simkover

For many thousands of years, humans have gazed up in wonder at “shooting stars” in the night sky. What causes these sudden flashes of light, as well as craters on the surface of our planet and other solar system objects? Join Howard Simkover from Montreal’s Dow Planetarium for a highly visual, thought-provoking presentation about meteors and meteorites. Howard will share his experiences, and his considerable knowledge of these “rocks from space”, including two particularly noteworthy incidents. One took place over Russia in 2013… and the other gave the dinosaurs a very bad day 66 million years ago.

  • Day: Thursday, October 10
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Picture of LinR lecturer Howard SimkoverHoward used his first telescope to observe the planet Mars when it came close to the Earth in 1956. Later, he became active in the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, where he served on the Observation Committee and the Board of Directors of the Montreal Centre. From 1968-89 he was a Producer/Lecturer with the Dow Planetarium (now the Planétarium de Montréal). He gave nearly two thousand live planetarium shows to the public. Some of the shows he produced there played to audiences in planetaria elsewhere in Canada and the US. He has lectured on astronomy at the National Museum of Science and Technology in Ottawa, and gives astronomy presentations to groups around the National Capital Region. Read what LinR participants have said about Howard.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 20
The Power of 0 and 1
Lecturer: Dr. Kevin Cheung

Modern digital computers are based on manipulating zeros and ones. However, you don’t need to be a computer engineer to appreciate the power of the numbers 0 and 1. In this lecture, we will first look at how to use these two simple numbers creatively to solve some interesting problems. We will then look at their role in the history of modern computing. The lecture is aimed at a general audience with a high school math background and an interest in math and technology.

  • Day: Tuesday, October 15
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  •  Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  •  Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer Kevin CheungLecturer biography: Dr. Kevin Cheung has been a faculty member of the School of Mathematics and Statistics at Carleton University since 2005. After completing his PhD at the University of Waterloo in 2003, he spent two years at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) Postdoctoral Fellow. His current academic interests include discrete optimization, designing and developing teaching tools, and exploiting technology to help students attain mastery.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 21
Fragile States and Transnational Terrorism
Lecturer: Dr. Joseph Landry

The terrorist acts of September 11, 2001 and their profound impact clearly demonstrate we are not immune to terrorism originating in countries with internal conflict, weak governance, or frail economies. This lecture examines terrorism, counter-terrorism, and the impact that terrorism from fragile states has on domestic and international security. How big of a risk is such terrorism, how is it spread, and what techniques are used to address it? Our discussion of both theoretical knowledge and case studies such as Libya and Afghanistan, will help you develop an academic and historical appreciation of this topic. Bring a critical and inquiring mind to this examination and critique of contentious issues.

  • Day: Wednesday, October 16
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer Joseph LandryLecturer biography: Joe Landry is currently Senior Analyst and Bureau Coordinator with the Peace and Stabilization Operations Program (PSOPs) at Global Affairs Canada, responsible for the coordination and development of the PSOPs 2019-2022 Strategy and for the priority country selection process. He also is an adjunct lecturer at Carleton University. Joe holds a PhD in International Conflict Analysis and Management from the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs at Carleton University. He was recently named as a fellow at the Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies (MIGS).

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 22
How Canadians are Conquering the Ballet World
Lecturer: Katherine Barber

When you think of hotbeds of balletic talent, Saskatoon and North Bay are not the first places that spring to mind. Yet Canadians are making waves all over the ballet world, often with little recognition at home. Get to know 18 of them in this entertaining talk, illustrated by video clips, which will also explore the variety of what constitutes “ballet” today.

  • Day: Thursday, October 17
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer Katherine BarberLecturer biography: Known as “Canada’s Word Lady”, Katherine Barber, MA (Lettres françaises, University of Ottawa) supervised the publication of two editions of the Canadian Oxford Dictionary and many other smaller dictionaries and appeared regularly on radio and TV. She is recognized as one of the foremost authorities on Canadian English and known to legions of fans for her knack for making word histories lively and entertaining. Her books Six Words You Never Knew Had Something to do With Pigs, a captivating romp through the history of the English language, and Only in Canada You Say, were Canadian bestsellers.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 23
Gallery Tour: Saints and Sinners – Lecture Full, Waitlist Open
Lecturer: Maria Martin

In this lecture we will visit the European Galleries at the National Gallery to view paintings and sculptures from the early Renaissance to the Baroque artistic periods. From religious subjects, to portraiture, to scenes from mythology, we will see how the work of European artists evolved stylistically between the 14th and 17th centuries. Together we will explore some of the signs and symbols that artists used in their depictions, to amplify and enrich the meaning of the image for the viewer. The range of female imagery, from depictions of Eve, to Venus, to the Virgin Mary, will also be considered. This single lecture is excerpted from Maria’s “Learning to Look at the Gallery” series.

  • Day: Thursday, October 10 (NEW DATE!)
  • Time: 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
  • Location: National Gallery of Canada
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $30.00 (HST included)
    • Free entrance to the National Gallery on Thursday evening
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Note: Meet at the National Gallery front entrance

Picture of LinR lecturer Maria MartinLecturer biography: Maria Martin has studied and worked in the Arts for many years. She holds a Master’s Degree in the History of Art from Queen’s University, and a Bachelor’s Degree in Art History from Carleton University. Currently a Manager with the federal government, Maria previously worked at the Canada Council for the Arts as an Art Consultant at the Council’s Art Bank, and as an Education Officer and Guide at the National Gallery of Canada.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 24
You Can Learn to Read Russian!
Lecturer: Dr. Marina Sabanadze

Although Dr. Marina Sabanadze cannot promise you’ll learn Russian in one single lecture, she promises to teach you the Russian alphabet. This “Cyrillic” alphabet was named after St. Cyril, the 9th century Byzantine monk reputed to have devised it. Dr. Sabanadze would like to share a small secret with you: the Cyrillic alphabet is much easier to master than usually assumed by complete beginners, so you will have it mastered in just a 2-hour session and have fun while doing it, too. Anyone can learn the basics of Russian reading quickly. Try and you will believe it, too!

  • Day: Monday, October 21
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Dr. Marina Sabanadze has been teaching Russian courses since 1988 at Carleton University, where she has earned many achievement and teaching awards. She earned her MA degree in Philology, Teaching Foreign Languages and Translation from the University of Vladikavkaz, USSR, and a PhD degree in General Linguistics from St. Petersburg University (former Leningrad), USSR, with a Canadian PhD equivalent from the University of Toronto. Dr. Sabanadze has also had an extensive teaching experience in Canada at the Departments of National Defense and External Affairs, where she was the youngest Director of the Russian Department (1988-1992). Her current research interests are in the area of theory and practice of translation.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 25
Iran’s Political System and the Making of Foreign Policy
Lecturer: Dr. Farhad Rezaei

If Iran’s political decisions seem opaque to you, join Dr. Rezaei for an overview of the republic’s political system and foreign policy decision-making process. Three major forces have an impact on Iran’s foreign policy: Normalizers who want integration into the community of nations, Hardliners who oppose changing Iran’s international posture, and the Supreme Leader who acts as a balancer. They constantly interact, change and negotiate over all things related to domestic and foreign policies. As you will hear, this complicated situation presents a problem because one can never predict how the interplay of these groups will dictate Iran’s foreign policy.

  • Day: Tuesday, October 22
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Farhad RezaeiLecturer biography: Dr. Farhad Rezaei is an Ottawa-based Iran’s foreign policy researcher. He is the author of four books, and numerous articles in refereed journals and chapters on a broad range of topics including Iran’s foreign policy, Iran’s nuclear program, nuclear intelligence within the framework of counterproliferation, and nuclear and radiological terrorism. His writings have appeared in Harvard-Iran Matters, the National Interest, Atlantic Council, Middle East Journal, Middle East Policy, British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies, Journal of International Affairs, Insight Turkey, Korean Journal of Defense Analysis, and Asian Affairs among others.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 26
Deep Underground, Looking for Dark Matter
Lecturer: Dr. Simon Viel

Dark matter is one of the main mysteries in fundamental physics today. Everything we can see directly around us is made of ordinary matter, yet our most recent models predict that the universe contains at least five times more dark matter than ordinary matter. Scientists around the world are trying to detect dark matter, including researchers working on the DEAP experiment located at SNOLAB in Sudbury, Ontario. Join Dr. Viel for an insider account of one of the ways he and other scientists look for dark matter with experimental particle physics: in SNOLAB underground detectors using liquid argon targets.

  • Day: Tuesday, October 22
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Simon VielLecturer biography: Simon Viel (Assistant Professor, Carleton University) is an early career investigator with 10 years of experience in experimental particle physics. Initially working on the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, during PhD studies at UBC and TRIUMF, he led searches for physics beyond the Standard Model and participated in early observations of the Higgs boson. Then as a postdoctoral fellow at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, he contributed to developments in silicon detector instrumentation and software for ATLAS detector upgrades. Now as a faculty member at Carleton since August 2017, with CFREF funding from the Arthur B. McDonald Canadian Astroparticle Physics Research Institute, he joined scientific collaborations operating underground at SNOLAB in Sudbury, Ontario, to search for rare phenomena such as dark matter interactions.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 27
Bad Movie Physics
Lecturer: Dr. Andrew Robinson

Movies often require the audience to suspend belief and portray scenes which are not physically possible. This is particularly true in action sequences. In this talk, I will mention some particularly outrageous, but entertaining, violations of the laws of physics, and discuss what would actually happen, and why events portrayed on screen would not happen in real life. Examples will be drawn from a range of movies, and will include vehicles jumping over collapsed bridges, cat burglars, space battles, image enhancement and firearms handling.

  • Day: Wednesday, October 23
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer Andrew RobinsonLecturer biography: Dr. Andrew Robinson is a Contract Instructor in the Physics Department at Carleton University. He has degrees in Chemical Physics and Physical Chemistry from Bristol University and Bath University. He has worked as a professional scientist in Germany and the UK, and moved to Canada in 2000. After working at the University of Saskatchewan, he moved to Ottawa in 2010. His current research interest is the teaching of Physics at the post-secondary level, and he uses innovative technology and pedagogical methods in his classes. He has won Faculty of Science Teaching Awards in 2012, 2014, and 2017.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 28
Democracy and Rule of Law Now
Lecturer: Dianne George

Liberal democracies such as ours are founded on law. However, populism rising in many democracies sets out to disrupt or dispense with democratic processes and to undermine law. This lecture will clarify the complex processes and values encapsulated in the term “rule of the law”, using Canadian examples. We will examine one of the cases that established the rule of law in Canada, in response to situations that have become alarmingly relevant again. We will also discuss the populist law and order movement in Canada, and its deleterious effects.

  • Day: Wednesday, October 23
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Dianne George studied law at McGill University, passed the bar in Ottawa, and became a member of the Law Society of Upper Canada. She began teaching part-time at Carleton University while articling and later exchanged the practice law for a position teaching in the Law and Legal Studies Department where she taught and researched Rule of Law for a decade before retiring. She received a Student Teaching Award and An Award of Achievement from Carleton University. Further interests were Law and Literature and Law and Animals, both of which touch upon rule of law.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 29
Music and Technology
Lecturer: Keith McCuaig 

A plethora of 20th century technological advances in music–including new instruments and a variety of effects–resulted in the creation of new sounds. This lecture will explore some of these musical inventions, including instruments such as the Theremin, synthesizer, drum machine, sampler, and looper. We will also examine effects that can be used in studio or in live performance, including reverb/echo, delay, tremolo, and more. There will be a variety of musical examples and live demonstrations, with the ultimate goal of increasing your enjoyment of music through a better understanding of music and technology.

  • Day: Thursday, October 24
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer Keith McCuaigLecturer biography: With an MA in Music and Culture, and over 20 years’ experience as a musician, Keith McCuaig is dedicated to all things music and art. He loves exploring the histories of popular music, especially the interconnectedness of genres, and the socio-cultural significance of music. Keith has extensive experience in researching, writing and teaching a variety of music-related topics; he’s taught musicology courses through Carleton University and the University of Ottawa, and presented at international musicology conferences. From performing, writing, recording, and producing, to lecturing, giving music lessons, and working with community music programs (such as Ottawa Bluesfest’s Blues in the Schools and Be in the Band), Keith’s life and passion is music. Read what LinR participants have said about Keith McCuaig.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 30
The Remarkable Cultural Impact of the Haitian Revolution

Lecturer: Dr. Philip Kaisary

The Haitian Revolution overthrew slavery, white supremacy, and colonialism, culminating in the Haitian declaration of independence January 1, 1804. It has long held an iconic fascination for a diverse array of writers, artists, and intellectuals, from the poets William Wordsworth and John Greenleaf Whittier to the jazz musicians Sidney Bechet and Charles Mingus. In this interdisciplinary lecture we’ll examine the Haitian Revolution’s literary and cultural impact, using literature, letters, film, artwork, music, and legal materials. Our explorations will demonstrate why the Haitian Revolution, like the French Revolution, must be accounted for as a world-historical event of paramount significance.

  • Day: Thursday, October 24
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer Philip KaisaryLecturer biography: Philip Kaisary is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Law & Legal Studies at Carleton University, and cross-appointed to the Department of English Language & Literature and the Institute for Comparative Studies in Literature, Art & Culture (ICSLAC). He is author of The Haitian Revolution in the Literary Imagination: Radical Horizons, Conservative Constraints (University of Virginia Press, 2014), as well as journal articles on topics including slavery and film, the Haitian Revolution and rights, and hemispheric American literature. Prior to his appointment at Carleton, Philip was a Fulbright Visiting Scholar at Vanderbilt University and a tenure-track Assistant Professor of Law at Warwick University. As a legal practitioner (solicitor), Philip worked in the fields of criminal defence, civil litigation, and in local government.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 31
The Jazz Fusion Era
Lecturer: Wayne Eagles

Join fellow music-lovers for an appreciation of Jazz Fusion: music that blends jazz improvisation with rock, funk and other styles. While prominent in the late ’60s and early ’70s, the genre is often under-examined in jazz literature. This lecture will introduce you to some of the genre’s unique musical characteristics, drawing upon lesser-known artists/recordings as well as more renowned exponents of the genre. We’ll also examine Jazz Fusion’s influences, from improvised psychedelia and progressive rock to free jazz and world musics. The lecture will include informed listening of music placed into cultural context, and will provide you with further resources to pursue.

  • Day: Monday, October 28
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer Wayne EaglesLecturer biography: Wayne Eagles has been a Guitar Performance Instructor for Carleton University’s Music department since September 1992 and Director of the School’s Fusion Ensemble since 2007. He maintains a busy private teaching schedule, does independent concert promotion, manages the TetraArtist recording label, and is an Endorsing Artist for a several high-profile instrument manufacturers. Wayne’s performance history includes Canadian Jazz and Blues Festivals, university music showcases, television appearances, the industry expo’s NAMM Show, and extensive club work. He has performed/recorded with renowned artists including: Adam Nussbaum, Billy Kilson, Ian Froman, The Platters, Ken Rosser, Funkdawgs, Super Awesome Club, The Bitches Brew Tribute Band, and T Bruce Wittet.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Lecture 32
How Real is a Real Number?
Lecturer: Dr. Kevin Cheung

Most people have learned through high school math to associate numbers with points on a line called the real number line. The integers (…,-3,-2,-1,0,1,2,3…) are typically marked on such a line. The rational numbers (i.e., fractional quantities) appear to fill in between the gaps. However, as the ancient Greeks knew, there are numbers that are not rational. Representing all possible real numbers requires infinite sequences. For example, π = 3.14159265… In this lecture, we will examine some of the problems and counterintuitive surprises that result from the way real numbers are defined.

  • Day: Tuesday, October 29
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconLocation: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer Kevin CheungLecturer biography: Dr. Kevin Cheung has been a faculty member of the School of Mathematics and Statistics at Carleton University since 2005. After completing his PhD at the University of Waterloo in 2003, he spent two years at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) Postdoctoral Fellow. His current academic interests include discrete optimization, designing and developing teaching tools, and exploiting technology to help students attain mastery.

Register here, on or after August 8th

Don’t forget to check out the Early and Late Fall 2019 Session offerings now!