Late Fall 2019 Session

The Late Fall 2019 Session will feature eighteen lecture series, three writing workshops, and three language workshops, as detailed below. (You can also view a PDF version of Learning in Retirement’s Early and Late Fall 2019 Session brochure.)

Note that our program now has TWO locations: main campus, and the new Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre. Please check your lecture or workshop’s location carefully.

Registration for the Early and Late Fall 2019 Sessions is now open! Please visit our registration page to register now.

Parking symbol legend:Parking legend. Double PP letters indicate prepaid virtual parking and PAYG indicates pay-as-you-go metered parking is available on a first-come first-served basis.

Lecture Series
1. How Outstanding Architects Live (& Die)
2. I Ain’t Marching Anymore: Songs of War and Peace
3. Matters of the Heart: Comprehensive Cardiology
4. Art Appreciation: Renaissance to Romanticism (Daytime) – Lecture Series Full, Waitlist Open
5. Behind the Headlines: Current News and World Events – Lecture Series Full, Waitlist Open
6. Babylon to the Big Bang: The Rest of the Journey
7. Women and Islam: Advanced Topics (Politics, Sexuality, Fiction and More)
8. The Weird World of Neuroscience
9. Structures of the Mind: Cognition, Memory, Perception, Emotion, Intelligence and More
10. Rock in the Late 1960s and Beyond – Lecture Series Full, Waitlist Open
11. The Hollywood Masterworks of Alfred Hitchcock – Lecture Series Full, Waitlist Open
12. Is There a Universal Truth about How One Should Live One’s Life?
13. Art Appreciation: Renaissance to Romanticism (Evening)
14. Learning to Look at the Gallery: Navigating the Mysteries of the Art World – Lecture Series Full, Waitlist Open
15. Classics of Detective Fiction: From the 1960s to Today – Lecture Series Full, Waitlist Open
16. A Brief History of the Cold War
17. World Religions – Lecture Series Full, Waitlist Open
18. The Archetypes of the Greek Pantheon: From Human to Divine

Writing Workshop
1. The Personal Journal: A Springboard for Memoir – Workshop Full, Waitlist Open
2. Elements of Fiction: Core Skills and Concepts for Storytellers
3. Writing the Stories of My Life: Remembering Through Reading

Language Workshops
1. Italian for Travellers Level I, Part II (Mon/Wed)
2. Italian for Travellers Level I, Part II (Tues/Fri)
3. Spanish for Travellers Level II


Lecture Series

Lecture Series 1
How Outstanding Architects Live (& Die)

Lecturer: H. Masud Taj

Lovers of biographies, join Taj for illustrated lectures on thirteen architects from Canada, USA, Europe, the Middle East, and India: Buckminster Fuller, Ron Thom, and Arthur Erickson; Wren and Brunel; Soane and Pugin; Hasan Fathy and Samuel Mockbee; Utzon and Aalto; and Charles Correa and Zaha Hadid. Combining “academic insight, artistic creativity, and unique personal anecdote”, the talks with wit and verve, seek not to dispel our existential loneliness, but make it more user-friendly. A life lived with irrepressible creativity may just about suffice to ensure that we face our finitude with fortitude.

  • Days: Mondays, October 28 – December 2
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 40 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer H. Masud TajLecturer biography: H. Masud Taj is an award winning adjunct professor at the Azrieli School of Architecture & Urbanism, and survivor of car-crash and a heart attack that left him with five stents. His architectural projects include the Navy Memorial and the House of Last Days which was commissioned by a dying client. He has featured at International Festival of Authors, Toronto; his book on an Indian apprentice to Architect Frank Lloyd Wright is archived in the Special Collection of Carleton University Library and his Embassy of Liminal Spaces calligraphy is a permanent installation in a Canadian Chancery abroad and the book inducted in the Library of Parliament. Read what LinR participants have said about Taj’s “How Outstanding Architects Live (& Die)” series.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 2
I Ain’t Marching Anymore: Songs of War and Peace
Lecturer: Dr. Stephen Richer

Together we will examine some key songs and singer/song-writers associated with the major wars of the past 250 years or so: the American Revolution, the American Civil War, WWI, WWII, and the Vietnam War. Among the musicians to be discussed are Pete Seeger, Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Phil Ochs, Eric Bogle, Neil Young, and Arlo Guthrie. Our focus will be on how the biographies of such key personalities interact with social context to produce songs related to war and peace. Through lectures, discussions, video clips and optional collective singing with instrumental accompaniment, the songs and their meanings will come alive.

  • Days: Mondays, October 28 – December 2
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

LinR lecturer Dr. Stephen RicherLecturer biography: Dr. Stephen Richer is a retired Professor Emeritus of Sociology and former Chair of the Sociology and Anthropology Department at Carleton University. He has published seven books and many articles, mostly on education and Canadian society. After retirement, he took on several projects, including Education Director on an around-the-world cruise, teaching social research to Cree people on James Bay, leading sing-alongs for Alzheimer’s patients, and producing fundraising shows. He has been a folk/protest singer since he was eighteen and more recently led protest singing against the CANSEC arms show and at rallies against the commercial development of Lansdowne Park. For the past several years Professor Richer has been teaching a series of courses on the history of protest music. Read what LinR participants have said about Dr. Stephen Richer.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 3
Matters of the Heart: Comprehensive Cardiology

Lecturer: Sarah Beanlands

The heart is a fascinating and complex organ. Join an experienced health care professional to demystify heart anatomy, functions, illnesses and treatment. We will discuss all matters of the heart, including arrhythmia disorders, conditions of the heart valves and vessels, and congenital heart diseases. We will also address the disease progression and latest treatment technology and drugs for each of these conditions. Come learn about cardiac risk factors, ways to keep your heart healthy, and cardiac diagnostic technologies and tests. Lectures and a hands-on exercise to interpret an ECG, plus time for questions and answers, will leave you more knowledgeable about this important subject.

  • Days: Tuesdays, October 29 – December 3
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Sarah BeanlandsLecturer biography: Since graduating as Valedictorian from her Bachelor’s degree in Nursing, Sarah Beanlands has completed a MSc in Health, Science, Technology and Policy and taught at the post-secondary level in multiple settings. As an instructor for Algonquin College, she lectured on theoretical material in classrooms and provided hands-on learning for students in a lab setting. In 2014, she was part of Algonquin College’s Breath of Life Team that travelled to Tanzania to teach local healthcare workers about neonatal resuscitation. Sarah has worked as a registered nurse in a variety of settings, from outpatient adult care as a research assistant, to critical pediatric care at Sick Kids Hospital, and now, as a Public Health Nurse at the Sexual Health Centre and the Safe Injection Site. Read what LinR participants have said about Sarah Beanlands.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 4
Art Appreciation: Renaissance to Romanticism (Daytime) – Lecture Series Full, Waitlist Open

Lecturer: Angela Marcus

Original artworks in the permanent collection of European Art at the National Gallery of Canada will form the path for this tour and talk. It will begin with an early Renaissance mini altarpiece, and end with paintings of Romantic themes and style of the 19th century. We will see the art of several countries, as this lecture series will encompass the Renaissance, Mannerist, Baroque, Rococo, Neo-Classical periods, and Realism. Iconography and subject matter will be far-ranging as will the political context of the various periods. Analysis will be led by the lecturer and enhanced by class participation and discussion.

  • Days: Tuesdays, October 29 – December 3
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: National Gallery of Canada
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $140.00 (HST included)
    • National Gallery Entrance fee not included
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Note: Please meet at the front entrance of the National Gallery of Canada.
  • Lecture series outline

LPicture of LinR lecturer Angela Marcusecturer biography: Angela Marcus (BA Hons/78 MA/93) has taught in Art History and Art Appreciation for over two decades. She has taught for several years for the Learning in Retirement Program. She has been an independent researcher, art writer, and curator.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 5
Behind the Headlines: Current News and World Events – Lecture Series Full, Waitlist Open

Lecturer: Dr. Elliot Tepper

In this World Affairs lecture series, we will discuss current events that are making the news. Hot topics of the week will be explored in depth, providing context and background for stories in the headlines. We will also be exploring some topics that did not make the headlines, but should have. The content will be determined weekly by emerging issues of importance to Canadians that affect our lives and our world. Come for lively discussions of the news that matters, led by a veteran Carleton University political scientist and media commentator. Perspective and analysis will be provided by the lecturer, followed by discussion with participants.

  • Days: Tuesdays, October 29 – December 3
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline not applicable

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Elliot TepperLecturer biography: Dr. Tepper is a veteran professor of comparative politics and international relations at Carleton University. He regularly provides media commentary at home and abroad on a wide range of topics, providing context and deep background to the news stories of the day. Dr. Tepper’s career in academia and public policy provides the basis for thoughtful analysis on current events, and his lifetime of teaching on-campus and through the public media provides the basis for an engaging, interactive classroom experience. An internationally recognized scholar, Dr. Tepper provides analysis and policy advice to national and international organizations. Read what LinR participants have said about Dr. Elliot Tepper.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 6
Babylon to the Big Bang: The Rest of the Journey

Lecturer: Dr. Peter Watson

The oldest written creation myth dates back to the Babylonians. Our modern understanding, involving ideas as exotic as dark matter and dark energy, represents the same drive to understand how the universe works. In this lecture series, we will step out beyond the solar system, understand stars and galaxies, and finally speculate about the origin and fate of the universe itself. This lecture series will carry on where the Early Fall 2019 Session series entitled “Babylon to the Big Bang: The First Billion Miles”, left off, but each series is freestanding.

  • Days: Tuesdays, October 29 – December 3
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 17, Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre (355 Cooper Street)
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 30 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Peter WatsonLecturer biography: Peter Watson learned physics and math at Edinburgh and Durham universities, and joined Carleton University in 1974, becoming chair of the Physics Department and then Dean of Science. He has worked at CERN (Switzerland) and Oxford and Edinburgh Universities, and spent two years in Nigeria. In addition to a 40-year research career in theoretical physics, he has taught a wide variety of courses at all levels, many involving innovative teaching methods. Although he retired in June 2008, he has continued to teach, give public lectures and do research. Read what LinR participants have said about Dr. Watson.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 7
Women and Islam: Advanced Topics (Politics, Sexuality, Fiction and More)

Lecturer: Dr. Monia Mazigh

This lecture series offers participants an opportunity to learn about topics usually neglected by media, or overly simplified by popular culture. We will cultivate a deeper understanding of women and Islam, through lectures, discussion, and academic and fiction sources. We will explore complex issues such as Muslim women in politics and in the Quran, Muslim women’s self-representation in fiction, women in Saudia Arabia and the Islamic Republic of Iran, and Muslim women and sexuality. This series follows on Dr. Mazigh’s well-received “Women and Islam” series, but does not have pre-requisites or need previous knowledge about the topics.

  • Days: Wednesdays, October 30 – November 27 (5 weeks)
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Monia MazighLecturer biography: Monia Mazigh is an academic, author and human rights advocate. She was the former National Coordinator of the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group. Mazigh was born and raised in Tunisia and immigrated to Canada in 1991. She was catapulted onto the public stage in 2002 when her husband, Maher Arar, was deported to Syria where he was tortured and held without charge for over a year. She campaigned tirelessly for his release. Mazigh holds a PhD in finance from McGill University. In 2008, she published a memoir about her pursuit of justice, Hope and Despair, shortlisted for the Ottawa Book Award. Her first novel, Mirrors and Mirages (2014), was short listed for the Book Trillium Award and for the Ottawa Book Award. Her 2017 novel, Hope Has Two Daughters, was published by Anansi House. She writes in her blog at moniamazigh.com.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 8
The Weird World of Neuroscience

Lecturer: Ashley Thompson

This lecture series will explore some of the most famous and strange cases in neuroscience, and what they have revealed to us about how the brain functions. From the most famous case of amnesia to a young man whose personality changed dramatically following a mining accident, some of the most revealing stories of brain function come from true stories of brain damage and the impairments that followed. We will discuss people who taste colours, have phantom limbs, and who believe their loved ones have been replaced by imposters. Don’t miss this journey as we discover some of the most interesting case studies in neuroscience!

  • Days: Wednesdays, October 30 – December 4
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Ashley Thompson is a senior doctoral student in the Neuroscience department at Carleton University. While completing her PhD research, Ashley works as a contract instructor in the Neuroscience department, teaching Introduction to Neurological Disease in both the fall and winter terms this year. Ashley began her PhD in Neuroscience at Carleton in 2013, working under the supervision of Dr. Shawn Hayley. Her research focuses on Parkinson’s disease (PD), and seeks to understand how we might be able to alter the environment of the regions known to be vulnerable in PD using substances that occur naturally in the brain. Read what LinR participants have said about Ashley Thompson.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 9
Structures of the Mind: Cognition, Memory, Perception, Emotion, Intelligence and More

Lecturer: Misha Sokolov

The human mind is an astonishingly complex system of interwoven internal structures that allow us to interact with our environment. This lecture series will explore some of these underlying structures and how they allow us to navigate the world. The first half we will focus on fundamentals of cognition such as how the brain creates the mind, how memory works, and how we perceive the world around us. The second half of the series will delve into more complicated phenomena such as intelligence, emotions, and social cognition.

  • Days: Thursdays, October 31 – December 5
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Misha SokolovLecturer biography: Misha Sokolov received his undergraduate degree from University of Ottawa in Psychology, and completed the Master of Cognitive Science program at Carleton University, focusing on emotional language production in the psychopathic population. He is currently a PhD candidate in the Department of Psychology at Carleton University, where his research is focused on the linguistic and para-linguistic factors that allow individuals to manipulate others. Aside from research, Misha takes immense meaning from teaching mini-enrichment courses for Ottawa area high school students, as well as lecturing in the Learning in Retirement program. He has a deep personal interest in the philosophy of psychology and philosophy of science. Read what LinR participants have said about Misha.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 10
Rock in the Late 1960s and Beyond – Lecture Series Full, Waitlist Open

Lecturer: Keith McCuaig

By the mid-to-late 1960s, rock music had solidified its place as a respected artform. This series focuses on the musical and cultural significance of rock music from 1967-1980, including subgenres such as psychedelic rock, blues rock, progressive rock, and early punk. Rock styles from the 1980s to the 21st century will also be examined, as well as the major figures and social and historical context of this genre. Discover the characteristics, sounds, and cultural influences of this exciting era of rock music, through lectures, audio and video examples, and live demonstrations. See also Keith’s Early Fall lecture series, “The Story of Rock and Roll: 1951-1966”.

  • Days: Thursdays, October 31 – December 5
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 17, Dominion Chalmers Centre (355 Cooper Street)
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 30 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Keith McCuaigLecturer biography: With an MA in Music and Culture, and over 20 years’ experience as a musician, Keith McCuaig is dedicated to all things music and art. He loves exploring the histories of popular music, especially the interconnectedness of genres, and the socio-cultural significance of music. Keith has extensive experience in researching, writing and teaching a variety of music-related topics; he’s taught musicology courses through Carleton University and the University of Ottawa, and presented at international musicology conferences. From performing, writing, recording, and producing, to lecturing, giving music lessons, and working with community music programs (such as Ottawa Bluesfest’s Blues in the Schools and Be in the Band), Keith’s life and passion is music. Read what LinR participants have said about Keith McCuaig.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 11
The Hollywood Masterworks of Alfred Hitchcock – Lecture Series Full, Waitlist Open

Lecturer: Dr. David Jarraway

By 1964, Alfred Hitchcock was the highest-paid director in Hollywood history. This lecture series will chart the rise to prominence of this ex-pat British filmmaker. We will examine Hitchcock’s made-in-America films in the context of war, post-war and Cold War times, from Rebecca (1940) and Suspicion (1941) through to Psycho (1960), The Birds (1963), and Marnie (1964). Themes will include Hitchcock’s use of the femme fatale, spectatorship, stasis and movement, and the anti-hero. Along the way we’ll address Hitchcock’s indebtedness to the “gothic” or “noir” influence of American writers like Edgar Allan Poe and Henry James, as well as to the American mid-century preoccupation with psychoanalysis.

  • Days: Thursdays, October 31 – December 5
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. David JarrawayLecturer biography: David Jarraway is Professor Emeritus in the English Department at the University of Ottawa where he specializes in the fields of Modern American Literature and American Film Studies. He is the author of Wallace Stevens and the Question of Belief: “Metaphysician in the Dark” (1993), Going the Distance: Dissident Subjectivity in Modernist American Literature (2003), and Wallace Stevens Among Others: Diva-Dames, Deleuze, and American Culture (2015), with chapters on George Cukor, George Stevens and Alfred Hitchcock. He is also the editor of Double-takes: Intersections between Canadian Literature and Film (2013).

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 12
Is There a Universal Truth about How One Should Live One’s Life?

Lecturer: Dr. Gordon Davis

Doing the “right thing” may often seem like common sense. However, human cultures exhibit divergent ethical norms. In this series, we will address ethical questions via an intercultural analysis, comparing Western and Buddhist approaches. Is there a “moral” answer or some other kind of “universal truth” about ethics? Some philosophers argue that the term “truth” is out of place here; others argue that such truths exist. Join us in this exploration: Will intercultural comparisons cast doubt on the objectivity of ethics? Or will such comparisons support the idea of objective normative (universal) truth?

  • Days: Thursdays, October 31 – December 5 (5 weeks)
    • No class November 21
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 17, Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre (355 Cooper Street)
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 30 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: After earning a BA in Philosophy from McGill University, and two Masters degrees (one in Philosophy, and one in History & Theory of Education), Gordon Davis obtained his doctorate in philosophy from the University of Oxford. He specializes in an area of ethical theory called meta-ethics, which draws on a range of fields, such as logic, epistemology and metaphysics, to better understand the nature of ethical reasons, moral reasoning and moral debate. His research has explored a range of historical comparisons of views on these questions, including comparisons of non-Western perspectives such as those found in several Buddhist philosophical traditions. In the Philosophy Department at Carleton, Dr. Davis has regularly taught courses in ethical theory, history of ethics and Asian philosophical traditions.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 13
Art Appreciation: Renaissance to Romanticism (Evening)
Lecturer: Angela Marcus

Original artworks in the permanent collection of European Art at the National Gallery of Canada will form the path for this tour and talk. It will begin with an early Renaissance mini altarpiece, and end with paintings of Romantic themes and style of the 19th century. We will see the art of several countries, as this lecture series will encompass the Renaissance, Mannerist, Baroque, Rococo, Neo-Classical periods, and Realism. Iconography and subject matter will be far-ranging as will the political context of the various periods. Analysis will be led by the lecturer and enhanced by class participation and discussion.

  • Days: Thursdays, October 31 – December 5
  • Time: 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
  • Location: National Gallery of Canada
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $140.00 (HST included)
    • Free entrance to the National Gallery on Thursday evenings
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Note: Please meet at the front entrance of the National Gallery of Canada.
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Angela MarcusLecturer biography: Angela Marcus (BA Hons/78 MA/93) has taught in Art History and Art Appreciation for over two decades. She has taught for several years for the Learning in Retirement Program. She has been an independent researcher, art writer, and curator.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 14
Learning to Look at the Gallery: Navigating the Mysteries of the Art World – Lecture Series Full, Waitlist Open
Lecturer: Maria Martin

This series will help you to navigate the mysteries of the art world, and develop your knowledge, appreciation and comfort level when viewing and discussing art. Each week we will gather together at the National Gallery of Canada to view artworks from the collection. There will be a different theme every week: landscape art; portraiture; representations of history and historical figures; still lifes and symbolism; photography; and modern/contemporary art. Lectures and discussions will take place in front of selected works in the Gallery’s collection

  • Days: Thursdays, October 31 – December 5
  • Time: 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
  • Location: National Gallery of Canada
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $140.00 (HST included)
    • Free entrance to the National Gallery on Thursday evenings
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Note: Please meet at the front entrance of the National Gallery of Canada.
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Maria MartinLecturer biography: Maria Martin has studied and worked in the Arts for many years. She holds a Master’s Degree in the History of Art from Queen’s University, and a Bachelor’s Degree in Art History from Carleton University. Currently a Manager with the federal government, Maria previously worked at the Canada Council for the Arts as an Art Consultant at the Council’s Art Bank, and as an Education Officer and Guide at the National Gallery of Canada.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 15
Classics of Detective Fiction: From the 1960s to Today – Lecture Series Full, Waitlist Open
Lecturer: Stefani Nielson

This series will consider developments in detective-suspense fiction since the 1960s, drawing from authors including Ian Rankin and Sara Paretsky. Of special interest will be the growing popularity of niche genres within detective and suspense fiction since the 1960s, focusing on post-Chandler American noir, Scandinavian noir, post-Golden Age British historical mystery, the humorous Canadian cozy mystery, and finally the 21st century female detective. Join us as we consider conventions and changes in this intriguing genre, as well as how these works of fiction relate to their times and to our lives.

  • Days: Fridays, November 1 – December 6
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR Lecturer Stefani NielsonLecturer biography: Stefani Nielson studied undergraduate literature and publishing at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, B.C. After working with a Vancouver non-fiction publisher, she subsequently taught writing courses while completing an MA in American literature at Pennsylvania State University, researching for the Ernest Hemingway Collected Letters Project. After moving to Ottawa in 2006, Stefani completed an MA in modern philosophy and cultural issues. Stefani has worked as a freelance editor and writer for local publications. Stefani has lectured for Carleton’s Learning in Retirement program and the University of Ottawa’s Continuing Education program on such topics as travel writing, 20th century American fiction and detective fiction. Stefani currently works with the Government of Canada as a technical writer and training adviser for technology projects. She enjoys films and gardening. Read what LinR participants have said about Stefani Nielson.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 16
A Brief History of the Cold War
Lecturer: Dr. Marcel Jesenský

This lecture series examines the origins, developments, and sudden end of the Cold War – the battle for hearts and minds – as the dominant factor of the history of international relations since 1945. Both sides appreciated the need to avoid a final battle between the two blocs at the cost of their survival. Topics include the Grand Alliance, the United Nations, the German Question, Canada and the Cold War, the Vietnam War, the Korean War, the Suez Crisis, decolonisation, crises in the Middle East, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the detente, and the collapse of the Soviet Union.

  • Days: Fridays, November 1 – December 6
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 17, Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre (355 Cooper Street)
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 30 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lectuer Dr. Marcel JesenskýLecturer biography: Dr. Marcel Jesenský is a specialist on the United Nations, international relations, diplomacy and European history. He holds a PhD in History (University of Ottawa). His first book The Slovak-Polish Border, 1918-1947 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014) chronicles the legacy of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. His latest book The United Nations under Ban Ki-moon: Give Diplomacy a Chance (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019) narrates the story of the United Nations under Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in the decade 2007–2016. Dr. Jesenský is teaching at the University of Ottawa and Carleton University, and his current research focuses on the history of the United Nations after 1945. Read what LinR participants have said about Dr. Jesenský.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 17
World Religions – Lecture Series Full, Waitlist Open
Lecturers: Dr. Shawna Dolansky et al.

This series surveys major world religions, focusing on a different tradition each week. Ten lecturers from Carleton’s Religion program will each speak to their own areas of expertise. The series begins with an introduction to the academic study of religion, followed by an overview of Indigenous traditions. Next, we will move through the origins and historical developments of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, featuring lecturers’ areas of specialization in each of these traditions. From here, the series will examine the origins of religion in India and China and focus on the development of Hinduism and various forms of Buddhism.

  • Days: Fridays, November 1 – December 6
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biographies:

This series will be delivered by 10 lecturers from Carleton’s religion department:

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 18
The Archetypes of the Greek Pantheon: From Human to Divine
Lecturer: Susan Sandul

Greek mythology is much more than simply a set of imaginary stories dreamt up by the ancient Greeks about the foibles and adventures of the gods. They express a broad range of human desires, needs and behaviours that can give us powerful insight into our lives today. In this six-week lecture series, we will closely examine the archetypes of the major gods and goddesses of the Greek pantheon, drawing from the myths, images and poetry of classical art, history and literature. By exploring the rich symbolism of the gods, we can also get to know ourselves.

  • Days: Fridays, November 1 – December 6
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 17, Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre (355 Cooper Street)
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 30 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Susan SandulLecturer biography: Susan Sandul holds a Master of Arts degree in Religious Studies, and Bachelor of Arts degrees specializing in English, Classical Studies and Religious Studies. She worked in the federal public service for thirty years as a Labour Relations Advisor and Conflict Resolution Specialist, delivering workshops in effective communications skills and conflict management. Susan developed and taught a six-week course on the Greek gods for the University of Ottawa’s Continuing Education program. Passionate about ancient cultures, she has been a volunteer for over ten years at the Canadian Museum of History, conducting learning activities for the public in special exhibitions. In her quest to understand human nature, Susan is convinced that the study of mythology not only enriches our lives today, but also helps us to understand ourselves. Read what LinR participants have said about Susan Sandul.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Writing Workshops

Writing Workshop 1
The Personal Journal: A Springboard for Memoir – Workshop Full, Waitlist Open
Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

Hemingway said, “in order to write about life, you must live it”. Whether we call ourselves writers or not, writing gives clarity to our lived experiences. This is a workshop for those who are interested in pausing, looking back, and honouring their lives through focused journal writing. While the goal of this writing workshop is to gather memories and stories, participants can expect to learn about writing as a craft, and how we go from writing for ourselves to writing for others. We will move from daily “me-centered” free-form writing that is often the spark for creativity, to writing with a purpose and audience.

  • Days: Mondays, October 28 – December 2
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 17, Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre (355 Cooper Street)
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $200.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Writing workshop outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Anna RuminLecturer biography: Dr. Anna Rumin is a native Montrealer whose identity has been shaped by the political landscape of her home province, her Russian roots, a passion for life-long learning that has been woven both formally in academia and informally through travel, voracious reading and writing, and a love for the stories hidden in our natural world. Her interest in narrative inquiry stems from her belief that not only do we all have a story to tell, but that our stories help us to better understand who we were, who we are and who we are becoming. She has now designed nine memoir-based writing courses that invite participants to think of themselves as the narrators of their life as seen and written through a particular lens. Regardless of who she is working with, Anna is committed to supporting those she leads, by providing them with opportunities to set and meet their goals. In her spare time Anna writes short fiction and has been the recipient of numerous awards.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Writing Workshop 2
Elements of Fiction: Core Skills and Concepts for Storytellers
Lecturer: Kate Heartfield

We tell stories to understand the world, and to change it. The skills in the fiction-writer’s toolkit have many applications, as narrative forms the basis of most kinds of writing, from journalism to personal memoir and beyond. Regardless of length, format or genre, all storytellers need a grounding in core skills and concepts. Each week’s class will focus on one of six elements of fiction (character, plot, narrative voice, dialogue and description, conflict and tension, and prose style), through a combination of instruction, class discussion, in-class exercises and optional peer feedback.

  • Days: Tuesdays, October 29 – December 3
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Main Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $200.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Writing workshop outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Kate HeartfieldLecturer biography: Kate Heartfield has been shortlisted for the Nebula, Locus, Aurora and Crawford awards for her fiction, which includes the historical fantasy novel Armed in Her Fashion, the time-travel novellas Alice Payne Arrives and Alice Payne Rides, and several dozen short stories in magazines and anthologies. Her interactive novel, The Road to Canterbury, is out now from Choice of Games. Kate is the former opinion editor of the Ottawa Citizen, where she worked for more than a decade as a columnist, editorial writer and editor. She now works as a freelance editor and writer. She also teaches in the journalism department at Carleton University, where she received a master of journalism in 2001. Her undergraduate degree is in political science from the University of Ottawa. Kate’s website is kateheartfield.com and she can be found on Twitter as @kateheartfield.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Writing Workshop 3
Writing the Stories of My Life: Remembering Through Reading
Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

We all have a story to tell. Often we think of a life story or memoir as a chronology of events. However, knowing where to begin can become so overwhelming that we put off writing the story at all. This is an invitation to re-collect, record and share the stories from your life through the lens of reading. What picture books, novels, collections of poetry, songs, magazines, journals, fiction, non-fiction, science-fiction, or historical-fiction played an important role in your life? How might writing about what we read give us a glimpse into who we were and who we have become? Please bring your own writing instruments to a safe environment where you will experiment with writing strategies using prompts, share your writing with others, and begin your collection of life-stories.

  • Days: Tuesdays, October 29 – December 3
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Main Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $200.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Writing workshop outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Anna RuminLecturer biography: Dr. Anna Rumin is a native Montrealer whose identity has been shaped by the political landscape of her home province, her Russian roots, a passion for life-long learning that has been woven both formally in academia and informally through travel, voracious reading and writing, and a love for the stories hidden in our natural world. Her interest in narrative inquiry stems from her belief that not only do we all have a story to tell, but that our stories help us to better understand who we were, who we are and who we are becoming. She has now designed nine memoir-based writing courses that invite participants to think of themselves as the narrators of their life as seen and written through a particular lens. Regardless of who she is working with, Anna is committed to supporting those she leads, by providing them with opportunities to set and meet their goals. In her spare time Anna writes short fiction and has been the recipient of numerous awards.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Language Workshops

Language Workshop 1
Italian for Travellers Level I, Part II (Mon/Wed)
Lecturer: Carla Bonora

Continuing where Italian for Travellers Level I finished, we will cover additional basic interactions, enabling participants to feel comfortable while communicating during a trip to Italy or in an Italian environment. We will cover how to introduce ourselves and ask basic questions about others, as well as to speak about hobbies, dates and time, daily life and family members. A field trip will familiarize participants with Italian food products in an Italian shop (different from the Level I field trip). A/V materials about Italian culture and music, as well as holidays and how to celebrate them will also be explored.

  • Days: Mondays & Wednesdays, October 28 – November 25
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 14, Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre (355 Cooper Street)
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $260.00 (HST included)
    • (Fee includes printed materials)
  • Enrollment capacity: 14 participants
  • Language workshop outline
  • Note: Last class will be a field trip to an Italian food shop
  • Pre-requisite: Italian for Travellers Level I

Picture of LinR lecturer Carla BonoraLecturer biography: A native of Naples, Italy, Carla Bonora has a Masters in History and Philosophy from the University of Naples. She is a journalist and has worked at the European Commission in Brussels, as well as for “Il Mattino”, the main newspaper of Naples. She also worked as an Ottawa correspondent for the Italian Canadian newspaper “Il Corriere Canadese”. She is an experienced teacher, having worked both in Naples and here as an Italian teacher. She has taught Italian Language and Culture at “Retraite en Action” in Ottawa since 2014. She is a member of the Board of Ottawa’s “Dante Alighieri Society”, and President of the Canadian Association “Friends of the Certosa of Capri”. Carla is a passionate traveller and she loves to cook Italian food.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Language Workshop 2
Italian for Travellers Level I, Part II (Tues/Fri)
Lecturer: Carla Bonora

Continuing where Italian for Travellers Level I finished, we will cover additional basic interactions, enabling participants to feel comfortable while communicating during a trip to Italy or in an Italian environment. We will cover how to introduce ourselves and ask basic questions about others, as well as to speak about hobbies, dates and time, daily life and family members. A field trip will familiarize participants with Italian food products in an Italian shop (different from the Level I field trip). A/V materials about Italian culture and music, as well as holidays and how to celebrate them will also be explored.

  • Days: Tuesdays & Fridays, November 12 – December 10
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 342, St. Patrick’s Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $260.00 (HST included)
    • (Fee includes printed materials)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Language workshop outline
  • Note: Last class will be a field trip to an Italian food shop
  • Pre-requisite: Italian for Travellers Level I

Picture of LinR lecturer Carla BonoraLecturer biography: A native of Naples, Italy, Carla Bonora has a Masters in History and Philosophy from the University of Naples. She is a journalist and has worked at the European Commission in Brussels, as well as for “Il Mattino”, the main newspaper of Naples. She also worked as an Ottawa correspondent for the Italian Canadian newspaper “Il Corriere Canadese”. She is an experienced teacher, having worked both in Naples and here as an Italian teacher. She has taught Italian Language and Culture at “Retraite en Action” in Ottawa since 2014. She is a member of the Board of Ottawa’s “Dante Alighieri Society”, and President of the Canadian Association “Friends of the Certosa of Capri”. Carla is a passionate traveller and she loves to cook Italian food.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Language Workshop 3
Spanish for Travellers Level II
Lecturer: Dr. Ioana Dimitriu

Hola! Further your listening comprehension and speaking abilities in Spanish in the fun and relaxed atmosphere of this workshop. Participants will practice the use of the present tense of regular and irregular verbs in oral communication. Conversation topics will focus on travel and will include making and responding to invitations, talking about favourite activities and daily routine, shopping for clothing, discussing culinary traditions, booking accommodation, checking in at the airport, and buying tickets for shows. Cultural components about different parts of the Spanish-speaking world will be presented through audiovisual materials. This workshop builds on the knowledge acquired in Spanish Conversation for Travellers I, yet any participants who have very basic communication skills in Spanish are welcome.

  • Days: Tuesdays & Thursdays, November 12 – December 10
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 342, St. Patrick’s Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $250.00 (HST included)
    • (Fee includes printed materials)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Language workshop outline

Picture of LinR lectuer Dr. Ioana DimitiruLecturer biography: Ioana Dimitriu has been developing and teaching Spanish for Travellers workshops at Levels I, II and III, in the Learning in Retirement Program since 2017. Ioana worked as an Assistant to the Ambassador of Argentina to Canada, and as a Spanish Sessional Lecturer at the University of Ottawa (2001-2008). She has recently been appointed a full-time Spanish Instructor at the School of Linguistics and Language Studies at Carleton University, where she has been working since 2010. Ioana holds a Ph.D. in Spanish (Comparative Literature) and an M.A. in Spanish (Applied Linguistics) from the University of Ottawa (2010; 2002). Her current research interests are in the area of testimonial writings, with a focus on memoirs of former political prisoners of totalitarian regimes in Latin-America and in Eastern Europe. In this context, Ioana is examining the role of the humanities and the arts in one’s upbringing, and specifically at how a significant background in languages, literatures, film, history, theology, and visual arts, nourishes and supports the human person in times of crisis. Ioana’s personal interests include exploring other cultures through literature, film and travel, and kayaking on Loon Lake in South-Eastern Ontario.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

You can view our Early Fall 2019 Session offerings here. We also offer a wide variety of Single Lecture Presentations (two hours each).