Late Spring Session (April 9 – May 29)

Learning in Retirement’s Late Spring 2018 Session will feature eleven lecture series, four writing workshops, and one language workshop.

To view a PDF version of Learning in Retirement’s Late Spring 2018 Session brochure, please click here.

Lecture Series
Biology of Darkness
Global Human Rights Challenges and Solutions
Canadian Popular Music
French Art of the 18th and 19th Centuries
Big Impact of Small Science: Nanotechnology and Bionanotechnology
A Brief History of the Byzantine Empire – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
The Profession of Arms in Canada: Peacekeepers or Warriors? – LECTURE SERIES CANCELLED
The Canadian Intelligence Enterprise: What Canadians Need to Know
Lessons from the Cold War: 1949 – 1989
The Other Renaissance(s): Art and the Global Encounter of the 14th – 17th Centuries – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
The Shining Prince: Poetry, Painting, and the Arts of Tang China and Heian Japan

Writing Workshops
Writing the Stories of My Life: Remembering Through Space and Time – WRITING WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Writing the Stories of My Life: Remembering Through Others – WRITING WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Poetry: The Open Mind – WRITING WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
From Good Idea to Good Read

Language Workshop
Spanish Conversation for Travellers III 

Lecture Series 1
Biology of Darkness

Lecturer: Robert Dick

As “Urbanites”, we take artificial outdoor lighting for granted. It may surprise many people that both natural and artificial light affects biology and the health of all animals and plants. We will discuss why life has evolved with this dependency and how they cope. This is a descriptive lecture series that introduces scotobiology, the study of the biological need for periods of darkness. It will provide an introduction to the impact of light at night (both natural and artificial) on wildlife and human health. Since humans control outdoor lighting, we will discuss lighting techniques that minimize the impact this has on nature.

Lectures, discussions, and visual presentations

  • Days: Mondays, April 16th – May 28th (no class May 7th and 21st)
    • 5 weeks
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Mr. Dick is a Professional Engineer with a B.Eng in Mechanical Engineering and a M.Eng in Aerodynamics. Few people can claim to have combined their passion with their profession, for which he has been awarded The President’s Medal and Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada. The night sky has drawn Robert Dick outside for about 50 years. For over 40 of these years, Robert has been sharing his knowledge and interest with the public. He has introduced thousands to the science and passion of astronomy and stargazing through public education, college and university courses. With pictures and films, Robert brings the sky alive for the audience. Based on his reputation as a communicator and educator, he was invited by the Canadian Space Agency to be the astronomy instructor for the Canadian Astronauts. When as a young amateur astronomer, he experienced how artificial lighting affects the quality of the night sky. To better understand the impact of artificial lighting on the environment, in the early 2000s he formed a research group to study the biological impact of light at night. The resulting field of research is now called scotobiology – the study of the biological need for periods of darkness. Robert now teaches this topic to environmentalists and ecologists. This resulted in a practical guide to outdoor lighting that has been adopted by Parks Canada, the US National Park Service and is promoted in Australia, Europe and globally through the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. This Guideline also forms the basis for the Canadian Dark-Sky Preserve Program with 19 Dark-Sky Preserves across Canada – and International Dark-Sky Places with more than 50 sites around the world. Through articles in newspapers and magazines, with contributions to several CD-ROM and DVD products, and appearances on television and radio, Robert brings a lifelong interest and respect for the night sky and night ecology to the public of all ages. 

Lecture Series 2
Global Human Rights Challenges and Solutions

Lecturer: James Hendry

Human rights is the language we use to describe the basic requirements of humanity and civility in a host of international activities, from protests in the developing world about culturally invasive mining operations to the battlefield. We will explore the attempts of villagers from overseas to make corporate giants remedy breaches of their rights to dissent and security of person. We will examine and discuss if international humanitarian law brings some humanity to war and its worst excesses. We will look at some of the attempts to enforce laws that govern human conflict, such as the International Criminal Court. How do countries broken by conflict try to repair the effects of conflict and attempt to bring about peace?

Lectures, discussions, and visual presentations

  • Days: Mondays, April 16th – May 28th (no class May 21st)
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture Series Outline

Lecturer biography: James Hendry (BA, Carleton, 1976; LLB, University of Ottawa, 1979; Ontario Bar, 1981) was in private law practice until becoming counsel to the Canadian Human Rights Commission in 1984. He joined the Department of Justice in 1989, where he was General Counsel in the Human Rights Law Section. He was Research Director for the Canadian Human Rights Act Review Panel, a Visiting Scholar at Harvard Law School on a Canada-U.S. Fulbright Scholarship in 2005, and has published extensively on Canadian and comparative constitutional issues. He has lectured in Canada, Spain, South Africa, the United States, and Hong Kong. He was Editor in Chief of Federated Press’ Charter and Human Rights Litigation journal from 1993 to 2016, and is currently Editor in Chief of the Philippe Kirsch Institute Global Justice Journal. 

Lecture Series 3
Canadian Popular Music

Lecturer: Keith McCuaig

This lecture series is an overview of popular music in Canada in the 20th century. Canada is home to a wide variety of musical genres, including folk, blues, jazz, rock ‘n’ roll, country, pop, reggae, and hip hop. The life and works of major musical figures in each of these styles will be explored, as well as stylistic and commercial trends, record labels, and the broader cultural and historical issues in Canadian music.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Tuesdays, April 17th – May 22nd (no class May 8th)
    • 5 weeks
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture Series Outline

Lecturer biography: With an M.A. in Music and Culture, and twenty years experience as a musician, Keith McCuaig is a KeithMcCuaigspecialist in all things music and art. He loves exploring the histories of popular music, especially the interconnectedness of genres, and looking at the socio-cultural significance of music. Keith has extensive experience in researching, writing and teaching a variety of musicological topics; he’s delivered guest lectures at two universities, presented at multiple international musicology conferences, and taught musicology courses through Carleton University and the University of Ottawa. From performing, writing, recording, and producing, to lecturing, giving music lessons, and working with community music programs such as Ottawa Bluesfest’s Blues in the Schools and Be in the Band, Keith’s life and passion is music. 

Lecture Series 4
French Art of the 18th and 19th Centuries

Lecturer: Adriane Aboud

This lecture series will follow the interesting evolution of the art of France in the 18th and 19th centuries. For a period of about 200 years, the landscape of French art changed drastically in response to the political and cultural shifts of a very turbulent time. The country’s art world expanded and contracted in response to these shifts, creating some of the most beautiful, thoughtful, and poignant artworks in western history. The series will be organized chronologically, beginning with the members of the French Academy and ending with the Impressionists.

Lectures

  • Days: Tuesdays, April 17th – May 22nd
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture Series Outline

Lecturer biography: Adriane Aboud received a Bachelor’s degree in History and Art History from McGill University in Montreal and a Master’s degree in Art History from the University of  Nottingham in England. She lived in Europe for two years, during which time she traveled extensively. Upon her return to Canada, she briefly took a job at the National Gallery of Canada before accepting her current post as an art history teacher at CEGEP Heritage College in Gatineau. 

Lecture Series 5
Big Impact of Small Science: Nanotechnology and Bionanotechnology

Lecturer: Dr Maria DeRosa

Nanotechnology is about making, measuring, and manipulating very tiny things – materials and devices a million times smaller than a millimeter. From our clothes to our electronics, our sporting equipment to our sunscreens, nanotechnology is being incorporated in products that we use every day. This lecture series will provide an introduction to nanoscience and nanotechnology. Lectures will examine what fundamental properties of materials change when they are at the nanoscale and why. The science behind new nano-enabled products will be explored. Bionanotechnology, which draws inspiration from nature, will be examined. The potential risks and benefits of nanotechnology will also be discussed.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Wednesdays, April 18th – May 23rd
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture Series Outline

Lecturer biography: Dr. Maria DeRosa is a Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Carleton University. Her research examines a family of synthetic nucleic acids known as aptamers. Her group is focused on developing a better understanding of these systems and using this information to design useful nanotechnology, such as biosensors, components for nanomedicine, or smart delivery devices. This research takes place in the LADDER (Laboratory for Aptamer Discovery and Development of Emerging Research), a facility funded by the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) Leaders Opportunity Fund and the Ontario Research Fund. Dr. DeRosa received her BSc and PhD in Chemistry from Carleton University in 1999 and 2003, respectively, and was awarded an NSERC Postdoctoral Fellowship to do research at the California Institute of Technology from 2004-2005. In 2005, she returned to Carleton as a faculty member in the Chemistry Department. She was a recipient of the John Charles Polanyi Research Award in 2006, an Ontario Early Researcher Award in 2010, and a Capital Educators Award in 2015. 

Lecture Series 6
A Brief History of the Byzantine Empire – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Marcel Jesenský

After 363 AD, there were more or less two rulers of the Roman Empire, one in the west, who was occasionally in Rome, the other in the east, who was nearly always in Constantinople. The “Byzantine Empire”– with its capital at Constantinople (earlier called Byzantium) – was the eastern half of the Roman Empire that survived the fall of Rome in 476. This series introduces the history and art of the civilization that flourished from Constantine the Great until the fall of Constantinople to the Turks in 1453.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Wednesdays, April 18th – May 23rd
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture Series Outline

Lecturer biography: Dr. Marcel Jesenský is a specialist on the United Nations, international relations, diplomacy, and European history. He holds a PhD in History (University of Ottawa). His book The Slovak-Polish Border, 1918-1947 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014) chronicles the legacy of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. He teaches at the University of Ottawa and Carleton University. His current research focuses on the United Nations under Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (2007-2016). 

Lecture Series 7
The Profession of Arms in Canada: Peacekeepers or Warriors? – LECTURE SERIES CANCELLED

Lecturer: Dr. James Cox

Canadian military forces have operated at home and abroad, quelling rebellion, fighting wars, conducting peace support operations, and helping Canadians after natural disasters, despite the cost in blood and treasure. While the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) continues to defend Canada and Canadian interests at home and globally, a question remains: are Canadian troops peacekeepers or warriors? Some think Canada is a peacekeeping nation, while others insist we are a warrior nation. Examine the constitutional role and structure of the CAF, the process followed to launch military missions, and how the CAF conducts military operations. 

Lecture Series 8
The Canadian Intelligence Enterprise: What Canadians Need to Know

Lecturer: Dr. James Cox

Mention government, military or security intelligence, and people often assume the worst. Many believe intelligence is a nasty, sinister activity that erodes civil liberties and personal privacy. Others imagine ‘James Bond’ escapades of assassination, spies, and spectacular car chases through crowded streets. Does any of that happen here? In Canada, there is widespread confusion and misunderstanding regarding the organization and practices of the various government agencies and offices comprising the Canadian Intelligence Enterprise (CIE). This lecture series explores the roles, structure, and activity of various Canadian intelligence agencies, to demonstrate how they collectively form the frontline of the security and defence of Canada.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips, and guest lecturers

  • Days: Thursdays, April 19th – May 24th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture Series Outline

Lecturer biography: Brigadier-General (retired) Dr. James (Jim) S. Cox completed a 35-year military career, mainly in operational command and staff positions across Canada and on five continents, before retiring from the Canadian Armed Forces in 2001. He commanded soldiers from the platoon to brigade group level, completing six operational tours of duty with the United Nations in Cyprus, Central Africa, Somalia, and three operational NATO missions in Europe. He has trained with the United States Army, The United States Army Green Berets, The United States Marine Corps, the British Army, the British Army Special Air Service, and the British Royal Marines. After retiring from the Canadian Forces, Jim served as an analyst in the Library of Parliament, from 2005-2011, supporting the House of Commons and Senate committees addressing national security and defence issues, and the Canadian delegation to the NATO Parliamentary Assembly. He then served as the Vice-President Academic Affairs with the Canadian Military Intelligence Association from 2012-2015. Jim studied at the NATO Defence College in Rome and is a graduate of the University of Manitoba, the Canadian Army Command and Staff College, and the Canadian Forces College. He holds an MA and PhD in War Studies from the Royal Military College of Canada. He also holds the grade of Officer in the Order of Military Merit. Today, at Carleton University’s Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, he serves as a Fellow with the Centre for Security, Intelligence and Defence Studies. He is also a Research Fellow with the Conference of Defence Associations Institute, a member of the Canadian Military Intelligence Association Academic Program Committee and a member of the Intelligence Analysis and Tactical Criminal Analysis Program Advisory Committee at the Justice Institute of British Columbia. 

Lecture Series 9
Lessons from the Cold War: 1949 – 1989

Lecturer: Dr. Andrea Chandler

During the Cold War, the United States and the Soviet Union engaged in an intense confrontation. Two competing alliances, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and the Warsaw Pact of communist states, faced each other in Europe. The Cold War stopped short of overt direct conflict, but it had many tense moments, such as the Cuban Missile crisis and the Polish crisis of the 1980s. As participants may remember these crises, the series will be an opportunity to share personal reflections. We will also explore what has been learned about the Cold War since the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Fridays, April 20th – May 25th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture Series Outline

Lecturer biography: Andrea Chandler is a Professor in the Department of Political Science at Carleton University, where she has been a faculty member since 1993. She teaches courses on Russian politics, politics of post-communist countries, comparative politics, and democracy. She studied at Dalhousie University and Carleton University before earning a PhD in Political Science from Columbia University. She is the author of several books, the most recent of which is Democracy, Gender and Social Policy in Russia: A Wayward Society Houndsmills, (UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013). She has published articles in a variety of journals, including Communist and Post-Communist Studies, Nationalities Papers and Democratization

Lecture Series 10
The Other Renaissance(s): Art and the Global Encounter of the 14th – 17th Centuries – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Eric Weichel

Participants explore the history of both western and non-western Renaissance art and architecture, focusing on the interrelationship between visual art, religion, sexuality, and colonialism throughout the fourteenth to sixteenth centuries. Special attention is paid to Persia, West Africa, Italy, and France. Themes may include the relations – artistic, economic, and ideological – between northern and southern Europe, the stimulus to innovative forms of art production provided by contact with non-Western peoples and subsequent artistic consequences of various forms of social injustice, the enduring appeal of classical Persian Iranian poetry, and the synthesis to many disparate traditions found in Mughal art from the period.

Lectures and visual presentations

  • Days: Fridays, April 20th – May 25th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Over the past five years, Dr. Eric Weichel has taught several popular lecture series for the Learning in Retirement program. He received his PhD in Art History from Queen’s University (Kingston) in 2013, and completed a SSHRC-funded Post-Doctoral Fellowship at Concordia University (Montreal) in 2015. His research specialties involve the role of palace women in facilitating visual and literary cross-cultural exchanges in the courtly sphere. Eric has curated an exhibition on eighteenth-century French prints for the Carleton University Art Gallery, and was a research assistant at the prestigious Rembrandt Specialist conference at Herstmonceux Castle, Sussex. Eric currently teaches at Nipissing University. 

Lecture Series 11
The Shining Prince: Poetry, Painting, and the Arts of Tang China and Heian Japan

Lecturer: Dr. Eric Weichel

Participants explore the refined relationship between literature (particularly poetry) and visual art (particularly landscape and history painting) as it was described by female authors in medieval Japan. Which Chinese poets were inspirational to the authors of The Pillow Book, The Tale of Genji or The Sarashina Diary? Why was Chinese poetry, visual art, and material culture so crucial to the courtly identities of these women, and what do the paintings, shrines, temples, palaces, gardens, and statuary suggest of their world?

Lectures and visual presentations

  • Days: Fridays, April 20th – May 25th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Over the past five years, Dr. Eric Weichel has taught several popular lecture series for the Learning in Retirement program. He received his PhD in Art History from Queen’s University (Kingston) in 2013, and completed a SSHRC-funded Post-Doctoral Fellowship at Concordia University (Montreal) in 2015. His research specialties involve the role of palace women in facilitating visual and literary cross-cultural exchanges in the courtly sphere. Eric has curated an exhibition on eighteenth-century French prints for the Carleton University Art Gallery, and was a research assistant at the prestigious Rembrandt Specialist conference at Herstmonceux Castle, Sussex. Eric currently teaches at Nipissing University.

Writing Workshop 1
Writing the Stories of My Life: Remembering Through Space and Time – WRITING WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

We all have a story to tell. However, knowing where to begin can become so overwhelming that we put off writing the story at all. This is an invitation to re-collect, record, and share the stories from your life through space and time. What spaces and places have played an important role in your life? What are your memorable journeys – big and small? How does “exploration” give us a glimpse into who we were and who we have become? What are our “a-ha!” moments that best illustrate a particular story, at a particular time, and in a particular place? Please bring your own writing instruments to a safe environment where you will experiment with writing strategies using prompts, share your writing with others, and begin your collection of life-stories.

Hands-on learning

  • Days: Mondays, April 9th – May 28th (no class May 14th and 21st)
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $195.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Writing Workshop Outline

Lecturer biography: Dr. Anna Rumin is a native Montrealer, whose identity has been in part shaped by the political landscape of her home province, her Russian roots, a passion for life-long learning that has been woven both formally in educational institutions and informally through travel, voracious reading, the belief that each person has a unique story to tell, and a near obsession with the outdoors, be it in the forest, on a lake or a mountain. Regardless of who she is working with, Anna is committed to supporting those she leads, by providing them with opportunities to set and meet their goals. Her guiding questions in both her professional and personal life are: “why am I doing what I am doing and how is that practice supported through research, experience, an ethic of caring, and wisdom?” Having moved to Ottawa in the fall of 2014, Anna continues to look for ways in which she can make a meaningful contribution to the community using the skills she has acquired in the journey that is her life.

Writing Workshop 2
Writing the Stories of My Life: Remembering Through Others – WRITING WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

We all have a story to tell. However, knowing where to begin can become so overwhelming that we put off writing the story at all. This is an invitation to re-collect, record, and share the stories from your life through the lens of “others”. How have your ancestors and family members played a role in who you are and why you do what you do? How have your professional relationships, your personal relationships, and the people you only knew in passing, figured in your life story? Please bring your own writing instruments to a safe environment where you will experiment with writing strategies using prompts, share your writing with others, and begin your collection of life-stories.

Hands-on learning

  • Days: Mondays, April 9th – May 28th (no class May 14th and 21st)
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $195.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Writing Workshop Outline

Lecturer biography: Dr. Anna Rumin is a native Montrealer, whose identity has been in part shaped by the political landscape of her home province, her Russian roots, a passion for life-long learning that has been woven both formally in educational institutions and informally through travel, voracious reading, the belief that each person has a unique story to tell, and a near obsession with the outdoors, be it in the forest, on a lake or a mountain. Regardless of who she is working with, Anna is committed to supporting those she leads, by providing them with opportunities to set and meet their goals. Her guiding questions in both her professional and personal life are: “why am I doing what I am doing and how is that practice supported through research, experience, an ethic of caring, and wisdom?” Having moved to Ottawa in the fall of 2014, Anna continues to look for ways in which she can make a meaningful contribution to the community using the skills she has acquired in the journey that is her life. 

Writing Workshop 3
Poetry: The Open Mind

Lecturer: Mark Frutkin

The poet Muriel Rukeyser once said: “Breathe-in experience, breathe-out poetry.” This interactive workshop will explore the question “What makes a poem tick?” We will look at examples of poetry from some of the world’s great authors, from the classical to the contemporary, exploring a variety of poetic styles and genres. Participants will consider what skills to employ when writing poetry, do in-class poetry exercises, and have discussions about writing and publishing. We will also take a look at some of your own poems in a relaxed, open-minded, and supportive atmosphere. Open to any style of poetic writing.

Lectures, discussions, and hands-on learning

  • Days: Tuesdays, April 17th – May 29th (no class May 15th)
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $195.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Writing Workshop Outline

Lecturer biography: Mark Frutkin’s work, including eight novels, three poetry collections, and three books of non-fiction, has been published internationally and translated into seven languages. In 2007, his novel, Fabrizio’s Return (Knopf), won Ontario’s Trillium Book Award and the national Sunburst Award, and was nominated for the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize (Canada/Caribbean region). In 1988, Atmospheres Apollinaire was short-listed for the Governor General’s Award for Fiction and for the Trillium Award. His collection of poetry, Hermit Thrush, was shortlisted for the Ottawa Book Award in 2016. Mark has a BA from Loyola University in Chicago, Illinois and has lived in Canada for 47 years. In the 1970s, he spent ten years living in the Gatineau Hills north of Ottawa in a log cabin with no electricity or running water. With nothing to do but read, write, shovel snow, and chop wood, this period served as his apprenticeship to becoming a writer. He has worked as a journalist and critic for the Globe & Mail, Harper’s, the Ottawa Citizen, the Montreal Gazette, amazon.ca/com, and other print and online media, and served as co-editor of ARC Poetry Magazine. Over the years, he could be found teaching creative writing at Carleton University, and the Universities of Ottawa, New Brunswick and Western Ontario. He has received numerous grants for writing from the Canada Council (including two ‘A’ grants), the OAC, and the City of Ottawa. 

Writing Workshop 4
From Good Idea to Good Read

Lecturer: Phil Jenkins

Taking a piece of writing from conception to completion is a journey many start but not so many finish. After thirty years as a working writer – six books (three national bestsellers), a thousand newspaper and magazine articles, lyrics, and poetry, Jenkins has designed a writing guide packed with insights, tips, exercises, and examples that will make starting and finishing a work of words a distinct probability rather than a possibility. Says Jenkins, “My workshop will pass on everything I’ve learnt in the writing game, from punctuation to publication. Helping you create writing you can be proud of is my goal.”

Lectures, discussions, and hands-on learning

  • Days: Tuesdays, April 17th – May 29th (no class May 15th)
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $195.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Writing Workshop Outline

Lecturer biography: Phil Jenkins returned to Ottawa from Liverpool in 1978, with a degree in Environmental Sciences and a Teaching Certificate. He is a writer and performing musician. He has written over six hundred columns with the Ottawa Citizen since 1991, and four national bestsellers: Fields of Vision, An Acre of Time (an Ottawa history), River Song, and Beneath My Feet, as well as three commissioned local histories: The Library Book, Off the Shelf, and A Better Heart. He teaches and lectures in writing and Ottawa history. 

Language Workshop 1
Spanish Conversation for Travellers III

Lecturer: Dr. Ioana Dimitriu

This workshop is intended as a refresher for participants who have already acquired basic knowledge of Spanish. The main conversation topic is travelling. Participants will be introduced to the forms of the past and the imperfect tenses, which they will use to talk about their travel experiences. A variety of short texts and audiovisual materials will be used to familiarize participants with the diverse socio-economic and cultural realities of the Spanish-speaking world. This workshop builds on the knowledge acquired in Spanish Conversation for Travellers II. However, students who have not taken the first two workshops are also welcome, provided that they have mastered basic communication skills in Spanish.

Language workshop

  • Days: Tuesdays and Thursdays, April 17th – May 24th
  • Time: 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. (1.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $250.00 (HST included)
    • Workshop fee includes specialized printed materials.
  • Enrollment capacity: 14 participants
  • Note: There are no prerequisites to take this language workshop

Lecturer biography: Ioana Dimitriu holds a PhD in Spanish Literature and an MA in Spanish Comparative Linguistics from the University of Ottawa (2010; 2002). Her Doctoral Dissertation focused on the figure of the labyrinth as a literary metaphor in the fantastic prose by Argentine author Jorge Luis Borges, and by Romanian historian of religions Mircea Eliade. She worked as an Assistant to the Ambassador of Argentina to Canada, and as a Spanish Sessional Lecturer at the University of Ottawa (2001-2008) and at Carleton University (2010 – 2017). In addition, Ioana has several years of experience teaching Spanish to adults who learn the language for travel purposes. Ioana’s personal interests include studying theology, exploring other cultures through reading and travel, and kayaking on Loon Lake in South-Eastern Ontario.