Spring 2019 Single Lecture Presentations

The Spring 2019 Single Lecture Presentations will offer our largest collection of single daytime and evening lectures to date, spread throughout the months of May and June. This year, the single lectures will replace the four-week Summer Session. We hope the wide selection of topics and dates will ensure there is something of interest for everyone.

Below you’ll find lecture time, date, descriptions and lecturer biography details. Alternatively, you can also view a PDF version of Learning in Retirement’s Spring 2019 Single Lecture Presentations brochure.

Registration for the Spring 2019 Single Lecture Presentations remaining on-going. Please visit our registration page to register now!

Single Lecture Presentations

1. Sky Woman Creation Story (May 2nd)
2. Populism’s Appeal and Impact (May 6th) – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
3. From Human to Divine: An Introduction to the Archetypes of the Greek Pantheon (May 7th)
4. Is Cleanliness Next to Godliness? Contemporary Conservation Practices Inspected (May 8th)
5. Celestial Shadows: Eclipses of the Sun and Moon (May 9th)
6. Introduction to the History of Magic and the Roots of Modern Witchcraft (May 13th)
7. A History of Oil: Past, Present, and Future (New date: June 6th)
8. L’Anse Aux Meadows: A Virtual Visit (May 15th) – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
9. Syria and the End of the Arab Spring (May 16th)
10. You’ll Never Get to Heaven: A Lighthearted History of Space Travel (May 21st)
11. Colonial Anxiety in India and Indonesia (May 22nd) – CANCELLED
12. If I Had a Hammer: Pete Seeger’s Life in Song (May 23rd)
13. The Science of Sound: An Evening of Fun with the Physics of Music (May 27th) – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
14. Difficult Conversations: Managing Interpersonal Conflict Effectively (May 28th)
15. What is the Future of Jerusalem? (May 29th) – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
16. Human Memory (May 30th) – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
17. A Guide to this Season’s Sky (June 3rd)
18. Decolonising Canadian Foreign Policy: The Middle East (June 4th)
19. Psychological Considerations of Dying, Death and Grieving (June 5th)
20. The Birth of Rock and Roll (June 6th)
21. Saints and Sinners: Exploring Renaissance and Baroque Art at the National Gallery (June 6th) – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
22. Effective Health Care: Barriers and Potential Solutions (June 10th)
23. Naming “Canada” (June 10th)
24. Buddhist “Discourse of the Mind” (June 11th)
25. Art Appreciation: Focus on Abstract Art (Daytime) (June 11th) – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
26. The Natural History of Algonquin Park (June 11th)
27. The Natural History of Northern Ontario (June 12th)
28. Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics (June 12th)
29. Wearing a Head Scarf Now? Why Not Before? Identity Performances of Young Immigrant Muslim Women (June 12th)
30. A Women’s Tour of Ottawa (June 13th)
31. Art Appreciation: Focus on Abstract Art (Evening) (June 13th) – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN 


Lecture 1
Sky Woman Creation Story
Lecturer: Dr. Kahente Horn-Miller
Sky Woman is a Haudenosaunee [Iroquois] creation story that connects listeners with their ancestors in the Sky World. Sky Woman is mother, grandmother, peacemaker, mediator, elder, and finally Grandmother Moon who watches over all women for time eternal. This performative interpretation contains teachings from the everyday lives of women who live in Kahnawà:ke and were the focus of Horn-Miller’s doctoral research. Narrated in the first person, her story illustrates that we are Sky Woman’s great-granddaughters, but our story is no different. As Sky Woman strives to create a heaven on earth, the hardship and the healing that she experiences move her and her world forward.

  • Day: Thursday, May 2nd
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 100, St. Patrick’s Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Dr. Kahente Horn-MillerLecturer biography: Dr. Kahente Horn-Miller (Kahente means “she walks ahead”) (Kanien:keha’ka/Mohawk) received her doctorate in 2009. She is a mother to four daughters. Currently she is an Assistant Professor in the School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies at Carleton University. As an active member of her community, Dr. Horn-Miller is a figurative bridge builder as she continues to research and write on issues that are relevant to her work and academic interests such as Indigenous methodologies, Indigenous women, identity politics, colonization, Indigenous governance, and consensus-based decision making for her community and the wider society. Her governance work and community-based research involves interpreting Haudenosaunee culture and bringing new life to old traditions.

It is the fruit of her endeavors as a Mohawk, an educator, and a mother that she brings into her interactions with Kahnawà:ke:ronon (people of Kahnawà:ke) and the academic community. Academics for her is not only about theorizing the issues that Indigenous peoples face as a way to find solutions; it is also about putting these theories into practice. It is through her teaching that she challenges her students to learn about her culture and about themselves as humans, which in the long term will foster relationships between Indigenous and non-native peoples that will go beyond the written word and the classroom and research settings. Read what LinR participants have said about Dr. Horn-Miller.

Register here, on or after April 2nd


Lecture 2

Populism’s Appeal and Impact – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Milana Nikolko

Why does populism resonate today? Social turbulence, economic crises, and migration are all believed to fuel populist resentment against political and economic elites. This lecture will address the appeal of populism, as well as why some consider it a threat to democracy. Together we will explore the transformation of populism over the course of the twentieth century in order to understand its modern variants, its contexts, and its impact on political discourse today.

  • Day: Monday, May 6th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Milana NikolkoMilana Nikolko, PhD, is an adjunct professor at the Institute of European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (EURUS), Carleton University. From 2005 to 2014 she was associate Professor of Political Science (Docent) at V.I. Vernadsky Taurida National University (Ukraine), and in 2008 was appointed as visiting professor in the Political Science Department, Valdosta State University (USA).

Dr. Nikolko is co-editor of Post-Soviet Migration and Diasporas: From Global Perspectives to Everyday Practices (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017). Her fields of interest include research on Ukraine’s national building process, mediation of grey zone conflicts, political narratives of victimization among ethnic groups, migration and diasporas in post-Soviet space, and research on social capital and diaspora networks.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 3
From Human to Divine: An Introduction to the Archetypes of the Greek Pantheon
Lecturer: Susan Sandul

The gods and goddesses of Greek mythology are much more than simply a cast of imaginary characters whose foibles and adventures have entertained people for centuries. Indeed, these colourful deities express a broad range of human desires, needs and behaviours that have inspired countless works of art and literature. They also give us powerful insight into our lives today. This lecture is an introduction to the archetypes of the major deities of the Greek pantheon, including Zeus, Athena, Aphrodite, Apollo and Poseidon. The meaning of myths, archetypes and symbols will be discussed as we explore the attributes of the gods, and discover what they tell us about ourselves.

  • Day: Tuesday, May 7th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer Susan SandulLecturer biography: Susan Sandul holds a Master of Arts degree in Religious Studies, and Bachelor of Arts degrees specializing in English, Classical Studies and Religious Studies. She worked in the federal public service for thirty years as a Labour Relations Advisor and Conflict Resolution Specialist, delivering workshops in effective communications skills and conflict management.

Susan developed and taught a six-week course on the Greek gods for the University of Ottawa’s Continuing Education program. Passionate about ancient cultures, she has been a volunteer for over ten years at the Canadian Museum of History, conducting learning activities for the public in special exhibitions. In her quest to understand human nature, Susan is convinced that the study of mythology not only enriches our lives today, but also helps us to understand ourselves.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 4
Is Cleanliness Next to Godliness? Contemporary Conservation Practices Inspected
Lecturer: Marie Clausén

The conservation and restoration of world-renowned artworks and buildings has been courting controversy lately. The transformation of Chartres Cathedral, primarily by means of cleaning, and the metamorphosis of its much loved Black Madonna statue (into a white one) have certainly been contentious. And now The Night Watch, Rembrandt’s arguably most famous painting, is scheduled to undergo a public restoration. Is cleaning a way of preserving the past—or of wiping it away? What is the relationship between dirt and historicity? This lecture will address such questions, drawing on thoughts from Alois Riegl, Rem Koolhaas, Juhani Pallasmaa, St. Francis of Assisi, and more.

  • Day: Wednesday, May 8th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Photo of LinR Lecturer Marie ClausénLecturer biography: Marie Clausén is the author of Sacred Architecture in a Secular Age: Anamnesis of Durham Cathedral (Routledge 2016/2017). She holds bachelor’s degrees in Political Science, Sociology, and Art History, and master’s degrees in International Relations (University of Reading) and Art History (Uppsala University). Her present academic interests include medieval church architecture, existential and phenomenological approaches to space, cultural heritage philosophies and policies (especially as applied to sacred architecture), and the forgotten practice of ekphrastic writing. She is currently researching the medieval churchscape of Norfolk, England, a region that boasts the highest density of medieval churches north of the Alps. Aside from her academic pursuits, Marie is a published poet, and has spent eighteen years in the academic book publishing industry on both sides of the Atlantic in a variety of editorial roles.

She is a participant in the upcoming podcast “What is Clean Enough?” arranged and sponsored by the Early Modern Cultural History at Uppsala University, Disent AB, University Of Gothenburg (Dept. Of Conservation), NTNU University Museum, Trondheim, and the Norwegian University Of Science And Technology. Read what LinR participants have said about Marie Clausén.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 5
Celestial Shadows: Eclipses of the Sun and Moon
Lecturer: Howard Simkover

Every couple of years, somewhere on the Earth, the Moon’s shadow touches down and sweeps at supersonic speed across oceans and continents. People situated in the path of this celestial shadow experience a total eclipse of the sun. From time to time, we may also see the full Moon enter the shadow of the Earth, giving us a lunar eclipse. This illustrated lecture is about the various types of eclipses: what they are, when they happen, the underlying geometry that causes them, why they are perceived to be such rare events, and the spectacular beauty that they offer to us. We will discuss recent examples of eclipses as well as upcoming total solar eclipses.

  • Day: Thursday, May 9th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Photo of LinR lecturer Howard SimkoverLecturer biography: Howard became interested in astronomy at a very young age. He obtained his first telescope shortly thereafter, and used it to observe the planet Mars when it came close to the Earth in the fall of 1956. Later, he became active in the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, where he served on the Observation Committee and the Board of Directors of the Montreal Centre.

From 1968-89 he was a Producer/Lecturer with the Dow Planetarium of the City of Montreal (now called the Planétarium de Montréal). He gave nearly two thousand live planetarium shows to the public, and also produced more than dozen shows for this planetarium; some of these shows played to audiences in planetaria elsewhere in Canada and the US. He has also lectured on astronomy at the National Museum of Science and Technology in Ottawa, and has given numerous presentations on astronomy to groups around the National Capital Region.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 6
Introduction to the History of Magic and the Roots of Modern Witchcraft
Lecturer: Robert Priddle

This lecture is an introduction to the theoretical approaches, major concepts, and reception of western esotericism in public and academic discourse. In it participants will discover the historical roots of modern esoteric practices, their reception in art and scholarship, and the impact of witchcraft on popular culture. We will also address the development of witchcraft theory in academic discourse, and the scholarly attempts to analyze what appears to be an irrational but universal phenomenon. Lay people and researchers alike will increase their understanding of the valuable interdisciplinary work required for the academic study of magic.

  • Day: Monday, May 13th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: R.A. Priddle is a special collection librarian and historian of magic, religion, and science from Williamstown, Ontario. He earned his Masters of Arts in Religious Studies from the University of Ottawa and his Masters of Information from the University of Toronto concurrently in 2013. Robert has traveled Europe and North America studying and speaking about magic and is delighted to return home to the region to share his experience and expertise in the ubiquitous but little understood technology of magic.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 7
A History of Oil: Past, Present, and Future
Lecturer: Dr. Ian Wereley

Oil is everywhere, in everything, and used by everyone. How did oil come to dominate our everyday lives? What is the story behind this powerful and mysterious natural resource that has shaped both the past and the present? In this lecture, we will examine the history of oil from the ancient period to the modern day. We will use a transnational approach designed to introduce you to the interconnected histories of oil in countries across the world. Specifically, we will use the themes of science, technology, culture, and conflict to guide our exploration of the key people, places, and events that have defined the history of oil.

  • NEW DAY: Thursday, June 6th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

LinR lecturer Dr. Ian WerelyLecturer biography: Dr. Ian Wereley is an energy historian interested in the past, present, and future of oil. His work seeks to demonstrate how history offers important lessons for navigating our own changing energy landscapes. He is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Calgary Institute for the Humanities, and Adjunct Curator of the History of Energy at the Canadian Museum of Science and Technology. He lives in Aylmer, Quebec, with his wife and son. Read Dr. Wereley’s profile on Carleton’s History Department website.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 8
L’Anse Aux Meadows: A Virtual Visit FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Tom Sherwood

UNESCO has recognized that there was a Norse settlement at L’Anse aux Meadows, Newfoundland 1000 years ago. It is the only known site established by the Norse in North America, providing the earliest evidence of European settlement in the New World. It is also the first meeting of two branches of the human family that emerged out of Africa and separated 60,000 years ago. This illustrated talk will “visit” L’Anse aux Meadows, review the documented facts, and consider some of the outstanding questions: Who were the Indigenous people who met the Norse? Were the Norse Christian? What was life like there?

  • Day: Wednesday, May 15th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Tom SherwoodLecturer biography: Tom Sherwood has two sets of professional credentials. As an ordained United Church minister, he had a full-time clergy career in parish and campus ministry (including as Carleton University Chaplain, 1999-2009). As a part-time university teacher since 1982, he has taught courses in anthropology, sociology, and religion at Carleton and Saint Paul University, from First Year to MA levels, usually with an emphasis on Canadian history and society. He has an MA in Canadian Studies in addition to a PhD in Sociology, and another Masters in Theology.

His national study of the spirituality and values of Canadian millennials was published in 2016 (Listening to The Echo: Young Adults Talk about Religion, Spirituality, God, Gods and their World, Friesen Press). His research has also been published in several articles and book chapters, and presented in documentary theatre projects: The god Monologues (2013), godVERBATIM in the 2014 Ottawa Fringe Festival, O god in the 2015 Fringe, Trans-Script in 2016-18, and Hope? in 2018. In 2019, he continues to teach and supervise graduate students, and lead fitness classes at Carleton.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 9
Syria and the End of the Arab Spring
Lecturer: Dr. Michael Petrou

The Syrian Civil War began eight years ago, amid the hope and expectation of greater political freedom that permeated the Arab Spring uprisings. Today, Syria is a broken country, with some 12 million of its citizens displaced. Bashar al-Assad, the dictator who ruled Syria when protests began, is still in power. Is this the end of the Arab Spring? What future does Syria now have? What has the Syrian civil war meant for the region, and the world? This lecture will explore what happened, and what the consequences are.

  • Day: Thursday, May 16th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Picture of LinR lecturer Michael PetrouMichael Petrou is an adjunct professor in Carleton University’s Department of History, a fellow-in-residence in Carleton’s Global and International Studies program, and a lecturer in its School of Journalism. He was a 2018 Nieman Fellow at Harvard University. In 2017, he won the R. James Travers Foreign Corresponding Fellowship, which he used to report on Syrian refugees in the Middle East. He has reported on war and conflict across the Middle East, Africa, and Central Asia, winning three National Magazine Awards. His 2008 book, Renegades: Canadians in the Spanish Civil War, was described as “painstaking and clear-eyed” by The Globe and Mail. The Spanish Newspaper El Pais called it “beautiful.” His 2012 book, Is This Your First War? Travels Through the Post-9/11 Islamic World, won the Ottawa Book Award for non-fiction.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 10
You’ll Never Get to Heaven: A Lighthearted History of Space Travel
Lecturer: Dr. Peter Watson

Everyone “knows” that the idea of space travel started with Jules Verne in the 1870s. In fact people have dreamed of exploring the heavens for thousands of years, and started thinking about the practicalities of it almost a century ago. This partly literary, partly scientific lecture broadly explores just how old the dream is. Interweaving fantasy and practical reality, we will discuss how we have left Earth behind to reach across the solar system to Ultima Thule and beyond. Is it possible to travel to the stars? Or is it true that, in the words of the old camp-fire song, you’ll never get to Heaven?

  • Day: Tuesday, May 21st
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Peter WatsonPeter Watson learned physics and math at Edinburgh and Durham universities, and joined Carleton University in 1974, becoming chair of the Physics Department and then Dean of Science. He has worked at CERN (Switzerland) and Oxford and Edinburgh Universities, and spent two years in Nigeria. In addition to a 40 year research career in theoretical physics, he has taught a wide variety of courses at all levels, many involving innovative teaching methods. Although he retired in June 2008, he has continued to teach, give public lectures and do research. Read what LinR participants have said about Dr. Watson.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 11
Colonial Anxiety in India and Indonesia – CANCELLED
Lecturer: Dr. Marieke Kalkhove

Lecture 12
If I Had a Hammer: Pete Seeger’s Life in Song
Lecturer: Dr. Stephen Richer

The year 2019 marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of one of the most influential and beloved troubadours of protest songs: Pete Seeger. To celebrate this folk singer and social activist’s legacy, banjo-playing sociologist Stephen Richer is giving lectures in Canada, the United States and Mexico. Come participate in this musical retrospective on Seeger’s life and times. The lecture is dynamic and interactive, and the audience will be hard-pressed not to sing along.

  • Day: Thursday, May 23rd
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Minto CASE Building, Carleton campus
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 140 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer of Dr. Stephen RicherLecturer biography: Dr. Stephen Richer is a retired Professor Emeritus of Sociology and former Chair of the Sociology and Anthropology Department at Carleton University. He has published seven books and many articles, mostly on education and Canadian society. After retirement, he took on several projects, including Education Director on an around-the-world cruise, teaching social research to Cree people on James Bay, leading sing-alongs for Alzheimer’s patients, and producing fundraising shows. He has been a folk/protest singer since he was eighteen and more recently led protest singing against the CANSEC arms show and at rallies against the commercial development of Lansdowne Park. For the past several years Professor Richer has been teaching a series of courses on the history of protest music. See the event posterRead what LinR participants have said about Dr. Richer.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 13
The Science of Sound: An Evening of Fun with the Physics of Music – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Diane Nalini

What makes each voice unique? How do sound engineers add magic to live performances and recordings? Why are concert halls designed in irregular shapes? How exactly should you hold a microphone when singing or giving a speech? And what do guitar strings have to do with quantum physics? Together we’ll explore these and many other fascinating questions involving both music and physics, aided by a few fun demonstrations. Absolutely no background in physics or music required!

  • Day: Monday, May 27th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Diane NaliniLecturer biography: Singer/songwriter Diane Nalini composes and sings in four languages. She has been a professional jazz singer for over 25 years and has recorded and produced four critically-acclaimed albums. She has sung at jazz festivals around the globe, and given gala performances for President Bill Clinton and Sir Paul McCartney. She was nominated for the Grand Prix de Jazz General Motors at the 2002 Montreal International Jazz Festival and was one of two finalists for the UK’s Young Jazz Vocalist of the Year awards for 2001. Diane’s original songs have also been featured in television and independent films. Her song “L’amour d’autrefois”, co-written with UK arranger/composer Dick Walter, was featured in the Hollywood movie “Charlotte Grey” starring Cate Blanchett. Diane is also the resident vocalist with the Ottawa Jazz Orchestra, and sings regularly with them at the National Arts Centre. For more information, other press reviews, and to listen to Diane’s music, please visit: dianenalini.com.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 14
Difficult Conversations: Managing Interpersonal Conflict Effectively
Lecturer: Dr. Rebecca Bromwich and Bevin Cate Worton

Difficult conversations, and interpersonal conflicts, are inevitable in our personal and professional lives. We are faced with difficult conversations in a range of settings, in our families, in relation to our health and that of loved ones, as well as in politics. Most of us find it tempting to avoid difficult conversation, but avoiding conflict can prevent us from moving forward on necessary matters and in our personal relationships. Learn practical suggestions, grounded in Harvard Negotiation Project theories, to keep projects and people functioning productively. This lecture will help equip participants to manage conflict in relationships and have transformative conversations, no matter how difficult this might be.

  • Day: Tuesday, May 28th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biographies:

Rebecca Jaremko Bromwich is Program Director for the Graduate Diploma in Conflict Resolution program. Dr. Bromwich is also a per diem Crown Attorney with the Ministry of the Attorney General in Ottawa. She is a member of the Alternative Dispute Resolution Institute of Ontario (ADRIO) and has a Certificate from the Program on Negotiation Master Class at Harvard University (2017). Rebecca received her PhD in 2015 from the Carleton University Department of Law and Legal Studies, the first graduate of that program. She was awarded a Carleton Senate Medal as well as the 2015 CLSA Graduate Student Essay Prize for her graduate work. Rebecca also has an LL.M. and LL.B., received from Queen’s University in 2002 and 2001 respectively, and holds a Graduate Certificate in Women’s Studies from the University of Cincinnati.

In addition to her several years teaching at the University of Ottawa’s Faculty of Law, Rebecca has taught at the University of Western Ontario’s Faculty of Law, and at the University of Cincinnati. She has also been a columnist for the Lawyers Weekly and has authored and co-authored several legal textbooks for students and legal system practitioners, including lawyers, paralegals and police. Rebecca has been an Ontario lawyer for over sixteen years. She worked in private practice from 2003 2009, starting at a large firm, doing a wide range of litigation work. She also worked for six years as Staff Lawyer, Law Reform and Equality, to the Canadian Bar Association, then as a Policy Counsel with the Federation of Law Societies of Canada. Rebecca is a co-editor of Robson Hall Law School’s criminal law and justice blog: robsoncrim.com and is a research associate with the UK’s Restorative Justice for All Institute.

Bevin Cate Worton obtained her LLB from the University of Alberta and her LLM specializing in labour and employment law from Osgoode. A member of law societies of Alberta and Upper Canada, she has worked for law firms in both Alberta and Ontario, litigating and providing legal advice and training to clients. After leaving private practice in 2007, she worked for the Ontario Human Rights Commission before coming to work for the Federal Government in 2008.

Bevin is currently advisory counsel with the National E-discovery and Litigation Support Services (NeDLSS) where she is responsible for providing legal advice and developing training related to all aspects of discovery. She also developed and instructs several courses related to legal project management and legal writing. Prior to joining NeDLSS, Bevin was part of Legal Practices Policy Branch (previously the Dispute Prevention and Resolution Division) where she provided advice and training on all aspects of dispute prevention and resolution including negotiation, mediation and arbitration. She is the co-chair of the newly created Department of Justice Commercial Arbitration Study Group.

An experienced public speaker and adult educator, Bevin has facilitated panels and made presentations at Justice, national, and international conferences. She has taught a number of classes to Justice employees and to client departments. She also instructs an upper level seminar at the Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 15
What is the Future of Jerusalem? – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Peter Larson

Jerusalem has important symbolic, economic, cultural and religious significance for Jews, Christians and Muslims. Both Israelis and Palestinians see Jerusalem as “their” capital. In 1948 the “green line” divided the city into Jewish West Jerusalem and Palestinian East Jerusalem. However, the subsequent Israeli military takeover of the West Bank began the “Judaization” of Jerusalem. Donald Trump’s support for an “undivided” Jerusalem as the capital of the Jewish State of Israel has accelerated this transition. This lecture will review the history of Jerusalem in the 20th and 21st centuries, and explore what the consequences of an exclusively Jewish capital might be for the future of the city.

  • Day: Wednesday, May 29th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Peter LarsonLecturer biography: Peter Larson is the Chair of Canada Talks Israel Palestine, (CTIP) a Canadian human rights organization focusing on the Middle East. His professional career included periods at the Public Policy Forum, the Conference Board of Canada, Le Droit, and as a consultant to labour unions and federal government departments and agencies. For the last 10 years, he has taken a particular interest in human rights issues in the Middle East, visiting Israel, Iran, Jordan, Egypt and the occupied Palestinian territories of the West Bank and Gaza. He has also led many trips to Israel/Palestine for Canadians interested in gaining a deeper understanding of the complex Israel/Palestine issue. His presentations are appreciated for being fact-based and balanced. He was the founding Chair of the Middle East Study Group of the Canadian International Council (National Capital Region), and was also a board member of the National Council on Canada Arab Relations, and the first chair of its National Education Committee on Israel/Palestine. In 2012, he was awarded The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal by the Governor General of Canada in recognition of his educational work on Canada Arab relations. Peter holds a PhD in Political Economy from Université de Grenoble, France. In addition to English, he speaks fluent French and passable Italian and Spanish. Read what LinR participants have said about Dr. Larson.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 16
Human Memory – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Ayça Güler-Edwards

In this lecture, we will focus on the functioning and nature of human memory. While the main functions of the memory involve receiving, storing and retrieving information, there are many factors that help or hinder these functions. We will address the dynamic nature of our memory, the encoding of information as memories, the retrieval and reconstruction of memories, the role of attention, and what is involved in forgetting. We will also explore theories of different memory systems, such as short-term and long-term memory.

  • Day: Thursday, May 30th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Dr. Ayça Güler-Edwards is a contract instructor at the Psychology Department in Carleton University. After completing her Bachelor’s degree (Business Administration with a minor in Psychology), she continued with her studies in social psychology and completed her master’s degree and PhD at the Middle East Technical University in Ankara, Turkey. Her main interests have been future time orientation, goal management, and personality. During her doctoral studies, she collaborated with Dr. Carsten Wrosch and completed her fellowship in the Personality, Aging, and Health Lab at Concordia University, Montreal, Canada. Since 2008, she has taught a Stress, Coping, and Well-Being Seminar to first year students at Carleton University.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 17
A Guide to this Season’s Sky
Lecturer: Robert Dick

From a residential area of an inner suburb or remote rural home, you can see starlight. However, your experience will be enhanced if you know more about those stars and constellations, and the “faint-fuzzies” you may see from your location. This presentation provides an introductory guide to the night sky. It will assume you are in a city with a limited view, looking over buildings and trees. We will describe what you will see and put this information into a context that is insightful, memorable, and useful

  • Day: Monday, June 3rd
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer Robert DickLecturer biography: Mr. Dick is a Professional Engineer with a B.Eng in Mechanical Engineering and a M.Eng in Aerodynamics. Few people can claim to have combined their passion with their profession. Robert is a life member of the Royal astronomical Society of Canada and is actively involved at the national level in several fields for which he has been awarded The President’s Medal and Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada. As a mechanical engineer he has taken lead positions on several aerospace programs and satellites. Based on his reputation as a communicator and educator, he was invited by the Canadian Space Agency to be the astronomy instructor for the Canadian Astronauts. The night sky has drawn Robert outside for over 50 years. Robert shares his knowledge and interest with the public and has taught full credit courses on astronomy at Carleton University, the University of Ottawa and Algonquin College. Through articles in newspapers and magazines, with contributions to several CD-ROM and DVD products, and appearances on television and radio, Robert brings a lifelong interest and respect for the night sky and night ecology to the public of all ages. With pictures and films, Robert brings the sky alive for the audience of all ages.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 18
Decolonising Canadian Foreign Policy: The Middle East
Lecturer: Dr. Philip Leech-Ngo

Since the election of the Trudeau-Liberals in 2015, Canada has regained its positive international reputation. Yet Canada’s legacy as a settler colonial state remains an unresolved stain. As the Liberal government strives to address this legacy domestically, elements of this agenda have also made their way into Canada’s international relationships. Focusing primarily on Canada’s Middle East policy, this lecture asks: if decolonisation is a “long-term process involving the bureaucratic, cultural, linguistic and psychological divesting of colonial power” (Smith 2012), what are the implications for Canada’s international relations?

  • Day: Tuesday, June 4th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Philip Leech-NgoLecturer biography: Dr. Philip Leech-Ngo is a senior fellow at the Centre on Governance at the University of Ottawa. He was the Gordon F. Henderson Post-doctoral Fellow (2016-2017) at the Human Rights Research and Education Centre at the University of Ottawa. He is the author of The State of Palestine: A Critical Analysis (Routledge, 2016) and the co-editor of Political Identities and Popular Uprisings in the Middle East (Rowman and Littlefield International, 2016). Leech-Ngo has taught at both graduate and undergraduate levels at the Universities of New Brunswick, Liverpool, Plymouth and Exeter. His recent consultancy work has included two research reports on the Palestinian Economy for Christian Aid, a project on corruption in the Middle East for Transparency International, and designing a course on Conflict Management for the Royal Military College of Canada.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 19
Psychological Considerations of Dying, Death and Grieving
Lecturer: Dr. Jennifer Thake

This lecture provides an overview of various aspects of dying and grieving, from a psychological and social perspective. It will explore the ways in which people die in infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age, as well as typical reactions to death at these ages. The lecture will present factors that people consider to be elements of a “good” death, including control over one’s death. It will examine the various places we die (home, hospice, hospital), and the benefits and pitfalls of each. Finally, this lecture will address the experience of grief, positive predictors of better adjustment, and an approach to grief therapy.

  • Day: Wednesday, June 5th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Dr. Jennifer Thake has unique training in health and well-being that includes a strong understanding of research and theory, as well as ground-level training in the delivery of services aimed at promoting holistic health. In addition to her PhD, Jennifer has completed an MA in counselling, and is a Registered Psychotherapist. This training has allowed her to apply her high level knowledge of health with clients at the ground level. She has been formally trained and clinically supervised in a variety of effective counselling methods, including cognitive-behavioural therapy, mindfulness and self-compassion, and motivational interviewing.

Jennifer’s true passion is the promotion of health and wellness, whether in the counselling setting, a classroom environment, or workplace workshops. Jennifer is warm, knowledgeable and funny, and she uses these personal strengths to make talking about and learning about health and wellness feel easy, normal and non-threatening.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 20
The Birth of Rock and Roll
Lecturer: Keith McCuaig

In the mid-1950s, musical styles such as rockabilly, rhythm and blues, and dance blues were developing in several American cities, and were marketed to white audiences as “rock and roll.” The mainstream media deemed this musical craze a passing fad, and although the first wave of rock and roll was over by the late 1950s, its influence lives on to the present. This lecture will feature the star performers who emerged, including Little Richard, Elvis Presley, Buddy Holly and Chuck Berry. Some factors that led to the rise of this music – including a growing youth culture and newly formed independent radio stations – will also be explored.

  • Day: Thursday, June 6th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer Keith McCauigLecturer biography: With an MA in Music and Culture, and over 20 years’ experience as a musician, Keith McCuaig is dedicated to all things music and art. He loves exploring the histories of popular music, especially the interconnectedness of genres, and the socio-cultural significance of music. Keith has extensive experience in researching, writing and teaching a variety of music-related topics; he’s taught musicology courses through Carleton University and the University of Ottawa, and presented at international musicology conferences. From performing, writing, recording, and producing, to lecturing, giving music lessons, and working with community music programs (such as Ottawa Bluesfest’s Blues in the Schools and Be in the Band), Keith’s life and passion is music. Read what LinR participants have said about Keith McCuaig.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 21
Saints and Sinners: Exploring Renaissance and Baroque Art at the National Gallery – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Maria Martin

In this lecture we will visit the European Galleries to view paintings and sculptures from the early Renaissance to the Baroque artistic periods. From religious subjects, to portraiture, to scenes from mythology, we will see how the work of European artists evolved stylistically between the 14th and 17th centuries. Together we will explore some of the signs and symbols that artists used in their depictions, to amplify and enrich the meaning of the image for the viewer. The range of female imagery, from depictions of Eve, to Venus, to the Virgin Mary, will also be considered.

  • Day: Thursday, June 6th
  • Time: 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
  • Location: National Gallery of Canada
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
    • Free entrance to the National Gallery on Thursday evenings
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Note: Meet at the National Gallery front entrance

Picture of LinR lecturer Maria MartinLecturer biography: Maria Martin has studied and worked in the Arts for many years. She holds a Master’s Degree in the History of Art from Queen’s University, and a Bachelor’s Degree in Art History from Carleton University. Currently a Manager with the federal government, Maria previously worked at the Canada Council for the Arts as an Art Consultant at the Council’s Art Bank, and as an Education Officer and Guide at the National Gallery of Canada. She has taught several classroom and gallery classes for Learning in Retirement.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 7 (new date)
A History of Oil: Past, Present, and Future
Lecturer: Dr. Ian Wereley

Oil is everywhere, in everything, and used by everyone. How did oil come to dominate our everyday lives? What is the story behind this powerful and mysterious natural resource that has shaped both the past and the present? In this lecture, we will examine the history of oil from the ancient period to the modern day. We will use a transnational approach designed to introduce you to the interconnected histories of oil in countries across the world. Specifically, we will use the themes of science, technology, culture, and conflict to guide our exploration of the key people, places, and events that have defined the history of oil.

  • Day: Thursday, June 6th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

LinR lecturer Dr. Ian WerelyLecturer biography: Dr. Ian Wereley is an energy historian interested in the past, present, and future of oil. His work seeks to demonstrate how history offers important lessons for navigating our own changing energy landscapes. He is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Calgary Institute for the Humanities, and Adjunct Curator of the History of Energy at the Canadian Museum of Science and Technology. He lives in Aylmer, Quebec, with his wife and son. Read Dr. Wereley’s profile on Carleton’s History Department website.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 22
Effective Health Care: Barriers and Potential Solutions
Lecturer: Dr. Jennifer Thake

This lecture will explore various barriers and solutions to seeking and receiving effective medical care from a psychosocial perspective. It will examine our abilities to accurately recognize and interpret physical symptoms as serious or benign, as well as the reasons we delay seeking medical care. The lecture will also address the medical care setting (i.e., examination rooms) and the ways in which patient-provider communication can go wrong or right. Finally, we will look at factors that impact our ability to adhere to treatments, especially those related to “prescribed” exercise and eating changes.

  • Day: Monday, June 10th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Dr. Jennifer Thake has unique training in health and well-being that includes a strong understanding of research and theory, as well as ground-level training in the delivery of services aimed at promoting holistic health. In addition to her PhD, Jennifer has completed an MA in counselling, and is a Registered Psychotherapist. This training has allowed her to apply her high level knowledge of health with clients at the ground level. She has been formally trained and clinically supervised in a variety of effective counselling methods, including cognitive-behavioural therapy, mindfulness and self-compassion, and motivational interviewing.

Jennifer’s true passion is the promotion of health and wellness, whether in the counselling setting, a classroom environment, or workplace workshops. Jennifer is warm, knowledgeable and funny, and she uses these personal strengths to make talking about and learning about health and wellness feel easy, normal and non-threatening.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 23
Naming “Canada”
Lecturer: Rebekah Ingram 

Every place name is a story of land, people’s relationships to the land, and the people who pass on this knowledge. This lecture discusses the importance of place names, while sharing some of the untold stories of how English, French, and Indigenous place names came to exist in the place now called “Canada”. We will examine how different cultures name places, and how place names connect us to the history of the land through language. We will also address how the loss of Indigenous languages affects how we understand the landscape and environment.

  • Day: Monday, June 10th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Rebekah R. Ingram is a linguist specializing in place naming, historical linguistics and Indigenous languages. She holds a BA from Syracuse University (Music, German), an MA in Linguistics (University of Toronto) and is currently a PhD candidate in the School of Linguistics and Language Studies at Carleton University. Her past work includes contributions to the Smithsonian Institution, the American Association of Geographers, and Babel language magazine. She has several publications appearing in 2019 including a book chapter. A community-based researcher, her areas of study include the connections between language and landscape, Haudenosaunee place names and Haudenosaunee and other Indigenous languages. Because of the interdisciplinary nature of her studies, she also works closely with the Department of Geography and Environmental Studies. She uses the Nunaliit mapping framework, developed by Carleton’s Geomatics and Cartographic Research Centre, to help document and revitalize Indigenous Knowledge through language.

“Rebekah is an important leader in her field of linguistics and geomatics. She takes students through an engaging look at how place naming practices change how we perceive our relationship to the places in which we live and move. Her work will have you thinking more broadly about how Indigenous languages communicate unique perspectives on the world and how naming places as we know them now says something differently about how my ancestors interacted with the environment. Rebekah is working under my direction with language speakers in the communities of Kahnawake, Akwesasne and Six Nations as she creates an important Nunnalit Language Map that will assist my community in language revitalization. I think you’ll find her lecture will make you think differently about place.”
Dr. Kahente Horn-Miller

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 24
Buddhist “Discourse of the Mind”
Lecturer: Tan Ngo

In Buddhism, all paths must lead to “wisdom”. If one practices deeply, one discovers that body and mind are equally empty, and that all phenomena are impermanent, unsatisfactory, and selfless. This realization leads one to overcome all discontents.

This one-day offering combines guided meditation, lecture, and discussion periods to help participants understand these essences of Buddhism, using “Discourse of the Mind” (or “Discourse of the Indestructible”). We will ask two important questions: Does “the mind” exist or is this just a flawed assumption? Do “objects of mind” (that which we perceive around us) have their own self-nature, or are they actually empty? These two questions, if viewed rightly, can bring peace and happiness to people, even in materialistic societies.

  • Day: Tuesday, June 11th
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $60.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 50 participants
  • Note: Parking for this lecture costs $12.00 (HST included)

Picture of LinR lecturer Tan NgoLecturer biography: Tan was born in Vietnam and started his Buddhist monkhood at the age of 8. After the death of his teacher, Tan left the monastery and joined the South Vietnamese army in 1971 as a lieutenant. After the fall of Saigon in 1975, Tan was confined in several concentration camps in Vietnam. After 3 years in the camps, he escaped as part of the boat people and settled in Ottawa in 1978. After retirement, Tan returned to monkhood in 2011, and began his PhD studies in Political Science at Carleton in the fall of 2016. He has an MA in Religion and Public Life from Carleton University and a BA in Psychology from the University of Ottawa. Presently, Tan is a teaching assistant to first year political science courses. In 2017, he was nominated for an Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award. Tan’s research interests lie primarily in comparative politics and public affairs and policy analysis. His Buddhist practice is rooted in Mahayana tradition.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 25
Art Appreciation: Focus on Abstract Art (Daytime) – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Angela Marcus

In visiting the National Gallery’s collection, we will think actively and look closely at examples of Abstract Expressionism, Minimalism, Conceptual and Pop Art in both the American and Canadian collections. Works by artists such as Jackson Pollock, Barnett Newman, Donald Judd, Frank Stella, Paul Emile Borduas, and Guido Molinari, will lead our looking and discussions.

  • Day: Tuesday, June 11th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: National Gallery of Canada
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
    • National Gallery entrance fee not included
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Note: Meet at the National Gallery front entrance

Picture of LinR lecturer Angela MarcusLecturer biography: Angela Marcus (BA Hons/78 MA/93) has taught in Art History and Art Appreciation for over two decades. She has taught for several years for the Learning in Retirement Program. She has been an independent researcher, art writer, and curator.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 26
The Natural History of Algonquin Park
Lecturer: Michael Runtz

Algonquin Park is world-famous for its dramatic beauty and diverse wildlife. Celebrated naturalist Michael Runtz has spent decades exploring the Park, photographing its biology, and writing books on its natural history. This lecture will focus on how geology and environmental conditions promote a fascinating diversity of plants and animals. It will also highlight the natural history of several species including some of the Park’s most famous animals (common loons, eastern wolves, moose, black bears, and beavers). Runtz vast knowledge and spectacular photography will bring to life this National Historic Site that bridges northern and southern Ontario.

See an article featuring Michael Runtz and his new Algonquin Park book.

  • Day: Tuesday, June 11th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Minto CASE Building, Carleton campus
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 140 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer Michael RuntzLecturer biography: Michael Runtz is one of Canada’s most highly respected naturalists, nature photographers, and natural history authors, with 11 bestselling books to his name. A dynamic communicator, Michael Runtz is equally at home in the television or radio studio, lecture hall or classroom. His Natural History course is the most popular of its kind in Canada, due to his award-winning infectious and enthusiastic teaching style. You may have seen (and heard) him hosting the international television series Wild by Nature, speaking as a frequent guest on television and radio shows such as CBC Radio Noon, or delivering presentations for groups as diverse as outdoor educators, professional biologists, schoolchildren, and naturalists’ clubs.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 27
The Natural History of Northern Ontario
Lecturer: Dr. Michael Runtz

Northern Ontario is often described as a land consisting only of black spruce and black flies. However, it also exhibits a complex array of species, in habitats ranging from the southernmost tundra in the world, to one of the world’s largest continuous wetlands. From polar bears to woodland caribou, from salt-tolerant plants to carnivorous wildflowers, northern Ontario boasts a fascinating biodiversity. Deepen your appreciation and understanding of the flora and fauna of northern Ontario, with the help of renowned educator and author Michael Runtz award-winning photography and natural history surveys of the area.

See an article featuring Michael Runtz and his new Algonquin Park book.

  • Day: Wednesday, June 12th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer Michael Runtz

Lecturer biography: Michael Runtz is one of Canada’s most highly respected naturalists, nature photographers, and natural history authors, with 11 bestselling books to his name. A dynamic communicator, Michael Runtz is equally at home in the television or radio studio, lecture hall or classroom. His Natural History course is the most popular of its kind in Canada, due to his award-winning infectious and enthusiastic teaching style. You may have seen (and heard) him hosting the international television series Wild by Nature, speaking as a frequent guest on television and radio shows such as CBC Radio Noon, or delivering presentations for groups as diverse as outdoor educators, professional biologists, schoolchildren, and naturalists’ clubs.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 28
Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics
Lecturer: Dr. Kevin Cheung

We are constantly bombarded with research claims. However, we may be skeptical of statistical techniques, given reports of scientific fraud and the widespread inability to consistently reproduce or verify scientific results. This lecture aims to help participants develop a mindset for assessing the validity of reported claims. We will look at examples of deliberate or accidental misuse of statistics, as well as various techniques and phenomena that can be exploited for misdirection.

  • Day: Wednesday, June 12th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Picture of LinR lecturer Kevin CheungLecturer biography: Dr. Kevin Cheung has been a faculty member of the School of Mathematics and Statistics at Carleton University since 2005. After completing his PhD at the University of Waterloo in 2003, he spent two years at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) Postdoctoral Fellow. His current academic interests include discrete optimization, designing and developing teaching tools, and exploiting technology to help students attain mastery.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 29
Wearing a Head Scarf Now? Why Not Before? Identity Performances of Young Immigrant Muslim Women
Lecturer: Dr. Fatemah Mohammadi

The hijab is an issue that feminists criticize, anthropologists interpret, religious authorities prescribe, and politicians and activists promote or oppose. Dr. Mohammadis lecture is based on her research with young immigrant Muslim women who did not wear headscarves in their Muslim majority countries of origin, but started to wear them shortly after moving to Canada. Using primary research and the work of sociologist Erving Goffman, among others, this lecture explores a variety of reasons behind the now controversial act of wearing the headscarf.

  • Day: Wednesday, June 12th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Dr. Fatemeh Mohammadi holds a PhD in Anthropology from Carleton Universitys Sociology and Anthropology Department. She has an MA in Religious Studies from Carleton University and her main research is on Anthropology of Religion. For her PhD she has extensively worked on Muslim youth living in Canada with the main focus on second-generation and their identity struggles and challenges. She has published many articles in the research area of the religious identities of young Muslim women in North America. She has taught at Carleton as well as at one of the well-known social sciences universities in Tehran (Iran).

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 30
A Women’s Tour of Ottawa
Lecturer: Dr. Tonya Davidson

Beginning at the “Women are Persons!” statue on Parliament Hill, on this walking tour I discuss how women have historically been imagined in relation to nation-building in Canada. The tour progresses to the present day along Elgin Street, where I offer a sociological reading of how mundane but crucial urban infrastructure, such as public transportation, parks, and public washrooms, are gendered in their design and use. Stopping at City Hall, several sites of significance, and various monuments, we will discuss the feminization of poverty and homelessness, homophobia, women’s role in municipal politics, housing, violence against women, and Ottawa feminisms.

  • Day: Thursday, June 13th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Parliament Hill
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 40 participants
  • Note: Meet at the “Women are Persons!” statue on Parliament Hill

Picture of LinR Lecturer Tonya DavidsonLecturer biography: Tonya Davidson is an Instructor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Carleton University. Her research interests have focused on questions of memory, national belonging, and the built environment. More specifically, Tonya has spent many years studying the social lives of statues in Ottawa. Her sociological research has been published in Journal of Canadian Studies, Space and Culture, The Public Historian, and Topia. With Ondine Park, she co-edited Ecologies of Affect: Placing Nostalgia, Desire, and Hope (2011, Wilfrid Laurier University Press). She is currently working with Ondine Park on a co-edited book for sociology students, called Seasonal Sociology (University of Toronto Press, forthcoming). In her free time she likes to give walking tours of Ottawa with Ottawa Detours.

Register here, on or after April 2nd

Lecture 31
Art Appreciation: Focus on Abstract Art (Evening) – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Angela Marcus

In visiting the National Gallery’s collection, we will think actively and look closely at examples of Abstract Expressionism, Minimalism, Conceptual and Pop Art in both the American and Canadian collections. Works by artists such as Jackson Pollock, Barnett Newman, Donald Judd, Frank Stella, Paul Emile Borduas, and Guido Molinari, will lead our looking and discussions.

  • Day: Thursday, June 13th
  • Time: 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
  • Location: National Gallery of Canada
  • Fee: $30.00 (HST included)
    • Free entrance to the National Gallery on Thursday evenings
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Note: Meet at the National Gallery front entrance

Picture of LinR lecturer Angela MarcusLecturer biography: Angela Marcus (BA Hons/78 MA/93) has taught in Art History and Art Appreciation for over two decades. She has taught for several years for the Learning in Retirement Program. She has been an independent researcher, art writer, and curator.

Register here, on or after April 2nd