Summer 2018 Session (June 5 – 28)

Learning in Retirement’s Summer 2018 Session will feature seven unique and exiting lecture series.

To view a PDF version of Learning in Retirement’s Summer 2018 Session brochure, please click here.

Lecture Series
Muslims and Mountain City-Palaces
History of Western Architecture – LECTURE SERIES FULL – WAITLIST OPEN
Summer Look Club at CUAG
Road Trip USA: Exploring Musical History of Four American Cities
Famous Women in The Quran – LECTURE SERIES CANCELLED
Jewels of the Night Sky
Growing a Culture: The History of Ottawa’s Musicians, Artists, Writers, and Architects: 1850 to Present

Lecture Series 1
Muslims and Mountain City-Palaces

Lecturer: H. Masud Taj

A Palace-City encloses within walls residences of the ruler and the ruled. Palaces are interspersed with gardens and baths, mosques and markets, bureaucracy and security, servant and served spaces. The walls are semi-permeable as the Palace-City strives to sustain a reciprocal relationship with the surrounding city. We will probe the city within city by examining Andalusian Spain’s Al Zahra in Cordoba and Al Hambra in Granada; and Mughal India’s Fatehpur Sikri; all sites as elevated as the metaphorical quest for the ideal city.

Lectures, discussion, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Tuesdays, June 5th – 26th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $100.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 40 participants
  • Lecture series outline

HMasudTaj1Lecturer biography: H. Masud Taj, award winning Adjunct Professor of Architecture at Carleton University was mentored by the leading exponent of Islamic Architecture, Hassan Fathy in Egypt. He delivered Keynote at the Second International Conference of Islamic Art and Architecture. Engaging the Other (Macmillan) featured his research in Spain that was showcased by Carleton University’s Faculty of Public Affairs and at Author Meets Readers: Ottawa International Writers Festival. His books are archived in University’s Special Collections and one inducted in the Library of Parliament.

Lecture Series 2
History of Western Architecture – LECTURE SERIES FULL – WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Raymond Stern

Extravagantly illustrated with 400 images, this lecture series covers the history of architecture over some 200,000 years, from Prehistoric times to today and beyond, in the western hemisphere. Each lecture will begin with the broad historical context leading to the core meanings of architecture through the ages, tracing the development of one period to the next, over time. To aid your understanding, basic theory of architectural design will be included, together with associated disciplines of structure and applied arts. We will address the question: what are the challenges that all buildings must meet to qualify as architecture? Included will be revelations about Canadian Indigenous architecture.

Lectures and visual presentations

  • Days: Tuesdays, June 5th – 26th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $100.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Raymond Stern graduated in 1960 from the Bartlett School of Architecture at University College London, England (Dip.Arch (UCL)). The following year he married Natalie Stern. He became a Member of The Royal Institute of British Architects (ARIBA) and a Licensed Architect, working as an Architect in London. After this he was a full-time Lecturer at the Hammersmith School of Architecture in London, which was a recognized RIBA course. In 1975 Raymond and Natalie both went to live and work in Singapore in South-East Asia. They stayed there for 6 years with their 3 children. Raymond was a Professor of Architecture at the School of Architecture of the University of Singapore, specializing in Design and History. He was a member of the Singapore Institute of Architects (SIA). During this time he held a research seat at the British Library in London. Raymond with his family then re-located as Landed Immigrants to Canada in 1981 where he joined the firm of Arthur Erickson Architect in Vancouver, British Columbia, also working in Seattle in the United States.

Raymond with his family moved in 1985 to Ottawa, Ontario where they became Canadian Citizens. He became a member of the Ontario Association of Architects (OAA). He worked as a Licensed Architect in Ottawa mainly on historical restoration projects and affordable housing development with the City of Ottawa. In 1997 he was honoured by the Mayor of Ottawa for his work in historical restoration. In 2008 he received an award from the Canada-Ontario Affordable Housing Program. Raymond is now almost retired from architectural practice and furthers his work on research of the history of architecture. In the winter he is based with Natalie in San Miguel de Allende in Mexico where for the last two years he has given a course in “The History of Western Architecture” at the Instituto Allende. For the past 15 years he has been a sculptor working in Montreal (raymondsternsculptor.com). He likes to keep fit and sees a lot of family and friends.

Lecture Series 3
Summer Look Club at CUAG

Lecturer: Fiona Wright

Discover great art at the Carleton University Art Gallery (CUAG) this summer with our unique ‘Look Club’! Inspired by the Book Club format, join Fiona Wright, the gallery’s educator, for weekly coffee and conversation sessions about art works in the gallery’s summer exhibition “In Dialogue”, a group exhibition of Indigenous contemporary art, and the gallery’s permanent collection of 20th-century Indigenous art. Together we’ll explore how artists reflect on the connections and contradictions that constitute contemporary Indigenous identities. Focused and open discussion will lead to new discoveries about artists and art-making, and help

Lectures and discussions

  • Days: Tuesdays, June 5th – 26th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Carleton University Art Gallery, St. Patrick’s Building
  • Fee: $100.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Fiona Wright is the Student and Public Programs Coordinator at the Carleton University Art Gallery (CUAG). She holds a Masters of Art History from York University (’11) and a B.A. Hons. from McGill University (’08). She has worked at CUAG since 2012, developing dynamic and exciting educational programming for the gallery’s exhibitions and permanent collection of art. 

Lecture Series 4
Road Trip USA: Exploring the Musical History of Four American Cities

Lecturer: Keith McCuaig

The 20th century saw an explosion in regional musical styles in several areas of the United States. During this lecture series, we will learn about the musical history of four great American metropolises. The first city on this tour is New Orleans, the birthplace of jazz. Next is Chicago, where styles like jazz and blues underwent several changes. These changes continued in New York City, which was also home to early punk scenes, and the birth of hip-hop. The last stop is Nashville, where we will explore the roots of country music.

Lectures, discussion, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Wednesdays, June 6th – 27th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $100.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: With an M.A. in Music and Culture, and more than twenty years’ experience as a musician, Keith McCuaig is a specialist in all things music and art. He loves exploring the histories of popular music, especially the interconnectedness of genres, and looking at the socio-cultural significance of music. Keith has extensive experience in researching, writing and teaching a variety of musicological topics; he’s delivered guest lectures at two universities, presented at multiple international musicology conferences, and taught musicology courses through Carleton University and the University of Ottawa. From performing, writing, recording, and producing, to lecturing, giving music lessons, and working with community music programs such as Ottawa Bluesfest’s Blues in the Schools and Be in the Band, Keith’s life and passion is music.

Lecture Series
Famous Women in The Quran – LECTURE SERIES CANCELLED

Lecturer: Dr. Monia Mazigh

Often, these days, we hear about the Quran, holy book of Muslims, as a book of religious and legal texts, but also of controversial and less explored notions like Jihad, for instance. Nevertheless, the Quran remains a book of stories where several of the protagonists are women. This lecture series will examine how the Quran narrated or brought to us the stories of some of these women. What do these stories tell us today about the women in their times, and what does it tell us about our times? This lecture series will focus on a feminine and contemporary reading of the sacred text. It is not a religious reading, even though it will mainly rely on the original texts from the Quran.

Lectures, discussion, and visual presentations

Lecturer biography: Dr. Monia Mazigh was born and raised in Tunisia and immigrated to Canada in 1991. She speaks Arabic, French, and English fluently and holds a Ph.D. in finance from McGill University. Dr. Mazigh has worked at the University of Ottawa and taught Finance at Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops, British Columbia. Dr. Mazigh was catapulted onto the public stage in 2002 when her husband, Maher Arar, was deported to Syria where he was tortured and held without charge for over a year. During that time, Dr. Mazigh campaigned vigorously for her husband’s release and later fought to re-establish his reputation and sought reparations. In January 2007, after a lengthy inquiry, her husband finally received an apology from the Canadian government.

Dr. Mazigh has authored a book called Hope and Despair, which documents her ordeal after her husband was arrested and how she campaigned to clear his name. It was published in 2008 and shortlisted for the Ottawa Book Award. Dr. Mazigh wrote many articles published in the Globe and Mail, The Toronto Star, the Ottawa Citizen, Le Devoir, and other newspapers. In 2011, Dr. Mazigh published a novel in French, Miroirs et mirages, revealing stories of four Muslim women living in Canada. Miroirs et mirages was shortlisted for the prestigious Ontario Trillium award, for the Ottawa Book Award, and for the Christine Dimitriu-Van- Saanen Award of the Salon du Livre de Toronto. In the summer of 2014, Mirrors and mirages was published in English by the House of Anansi Press. Dr. Mazigh wrote a second novel about the events of the Arab Spring. Hope has Two Daughters has been published in English in 2017 by the House of Anansi Press. The book was shortlisted for the Champlain Award. Dr. Mazigh has been teaching a lecture series entitled “Women and Islam” at the Learning in Retirement Program at Carleton University since 2014. Dr. Mazigh presently lives in Ottawa with her husband and two children.

Lecture Series 6
Jewels of the Night Sky

Lecturer: Robert Dick

This lecture series will guide you to the most impressive and important celestial objects in the sky that are visible with only our eyes and perhaps binoculars. These few objects chronicle our place in the Universe. We will locate, describe, and explain these jewels, and we will put them into the context of the cosmos. You will learn how to see at night, where to look, and what to expect. This lecture series will introduce how we can get the most out of an evening stroll under a clear sky. In doing so, we will forge a stronger connection between our lives that the rest of the Universe.

Lectures, discussion and visual presentations

  • Days: Thursdays, June 7th – 28th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $100.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Mr. Dick is a Professional Engineer with a B.Eng in Mechanical Engineering and a M.Eng in Aerodynamics. Few people can claim to have combined their passion with their profession, for which he has been awarded The President’s Medal and Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada. The night sky has drawn Robert Dick outside for about 50 years. For over 40 of these years, Robert has been sharing his knowledge and interest with the public. After teaching astronomy at Carleton University and the University of Ottawa, he is now associated with the University of Ottawa as an astronomy instructor. He has introduced thousands to the science and passion of astronomy and stargazing through public education, college and university courses. With pictures and films, Robert brings the sky alive for the audience. Based on his reputation as a communicator and educator, he was invited by the Canadian Space Agency to be the astronomy instructor for the Canadian Astronauts.

As a young amateur astronomer, he experienced how artificial lighting affects the quality of the night sky. To better understand the impact of artificial lighting on the environment, in the early 2000s he formed a research group to study the biological impact of light at night. The resulting field of research is now called scotobiology – the study of the biological need for periods of darkness. This led to the development of specifications for “low-impact” illumination, and design of the EcoLight luminaire. In addition, it resulted in a practical guide to outdoor lighting that has been adopted by Parks Canada, the US National Park Service and is promoted in Australia, Europe and globally through the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. This Guideline also forms the basis for the Canadian Dark-Sky Preserve Program with 19 Dark-Sky Preserves across Canada – and International Dark Sky Places with more than 50 sites around the world. Through articles in newspapers and magazines, with contributions to several CD-ROM and DVD products, and appearances on television and radio, Robert brings a lifelong interest and respect for the night sky and night ecology to the public of all ages.

Lecture Series 7
Growing a Culture: The History of Ottawa’s Musicians, Artists, Writers, and Architects: 1850 – Present

Lecturer: Phil Jenkins

A selective, lively history of the development between 1850 and 2000 of four arts in Ottawa: Art, Literature, Music, and Architecture. The major persons in each discipline and their works will be illuminated, and their part in the cultural development of Ottawa described. Each art will have a complete two-hour lecture, in the order; Art, Literature, Music, Architecture (ALMA). Slides, readings, musical performances (including live by lecturer) will be incorporated.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips, and live musical performances

  • Days: Thursdays, June 7th – 28th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $100.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Phil Jenkins returned to Ottawa from Liverpool in 1978, with a degree in Environmental Sciences and a Teaching Certificate. He is a writer and performing musician. He has written over 1000 columns with the Ottawa Citizen (1991-2016), and four national bestsellers; Fields of Vision, An Acre of Time, River Song, and Beneath My Feet, plus three commissioned local histories; The Library Book, Off the Shelf and A Better Heart. He has recorded three albums, performed in Ottawa solo and in bands for thirty years, and is an amateur student of Ottawa’s literary, artistic, musical and architectural history. He teaches and lectures in writing and Ottawa history.