Winter 2018 Session (January 8th – February 23rd)

The Winter 2018 Session offers an exciting line-up of twelve lecture series, two writing workshops, and six language workshops!

To view a PDF version of Learning in Retirement’s Winter 2018 Session brochure, please click here.

Lecture Series
How Outstanding Architects Live (& Die) – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
London’s Art Scene: The Bloomsbury Group – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
The Finer Points of Listening to Music
Serenissima Repubblica: The Art of Renaissance Venice – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Art Appreciation: Canadian Art (Daytime) – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Introduction to Neurological Disease
The Heart of Europe: A History of Central Europe – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
The Heart of Europe: A History of Central Europe – Section II
Sensory Worlds: The Neural Basis of Animal Behaviour
From Longhouse to Lumber to Legislation: An Anecdotal History of Ottawa
Art Appreciation: Canadian Art (Evening) – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
How Nutrition Changes the Aging Brain – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
A Brief History of Jazz: Duke, Dizzy, Miles, Monk, Mingus and More

Writing Workshops
Remembering Through Reading: Stories From My Life – WRITING WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
My Life as a Museum: A Springboard for Memoir – WRITING WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Language Workshops
Spanish Conversation for Travellers I – Section I – LANGUAGE WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Spanish Conversation for Travellers I – Section II
Spanish Conversation for Travellers I – Section III
Spanish Conversation for Travellers II
Basic Conversational French
Introduction to American Sign Language

Lecture Series 1
How Outstanding Architects Live (& Die) – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: H. Masud Taj

For lovers of biographies: illustrated lectures on thirteen NEW architects from Canada, USA, Europe, the Middle East, and India. Combining ‘academic insight, artistic creativity, and unique personal anecdote’, the talks with wit and verve, seek not to dispel our existential loneliness, but make it more user-friendly. A life lived with irrepressible creativity may just about suffice to ensure that we face our finitude with fortitude. Architects that come alive: Buckminster Fuller, Ron Thom, and Arthur Erickson; Wren and Brunel; Soane and Pugin; Hasan Fathy and Samuel Mockbee; Utzon and Aalto; and Charles Correa and Zaha Hadid.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Mondays, January 8th – February 12th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 40 participants

HMasudTaj1

Lecturer biography: H Masud Taj, award winning adjunct professor at the Azrieli School of Architecture and car crash survivor returns after a near-fatal heart attack that left him with five stents and this new lecture course. His projects include the Navy Memorial and the House of Last Days which was commissioned by a dying client. He has featured at International Festival of Authors, Toronto; his book on an Indian apprentice to Architect Frank Lloyd Wright is archived in the Special Collection of Carleton University Library and his multi-lingual multi-disciplinary The Embassy of Liminal Spaces has been inducted into the Library of Parliament.

Lecture Series 2
London’s Art Scene: The Bloomsbury Group – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Marieke Kalkhove

At the beginning of the twentieth century, a group of intellectuals started to gather in the London neighborhood of Bloomsbury. The core members included fiction writers Virginia Woolf and E.M. Forster, post-impressionist painters Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant, art critics Clive Bell and Roger Fry, and biographer Lytton Strachey. Liberal and progressive, they encouraged the creation of art, were generally opposed to militarism, and formed intimate friendships. Examine the art and writings of Bloomsbury’s core members and analyze the works of artists associated with Bloomsbury, such as Katherine Mansfield’s short stories and T.S. Eliot’s poetry. Possible topics of discussion include the suffragette movement, the influence of psychoanalysis, and the aesthetic principles of modernism. For the lecture series schedule and reading list, please visit the lecturer’s website: http://bloomsbury.weebly.com.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Mondays, January 8th – February 12th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Marieke Kalkhove is a Dutchie living in Canada, a literature geek, a dog lover, an Ashtangi, an electronic dance music enthusiast, and an English professor. You may have seen her speeding on her bike, racing from one university to another to teach a class. She teaches Communications at Algonquin College and literature courses for the Personal Enrichment Program at the University of Ottawa and for the Centre for Initiatives in Education at Carleton University. She has a Ph.D. in English Language and Literature from Queen’s University, a Master of Arts degree from Carleton University, and a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) degree from the University of Winnipeg. Marieke loves writing and language. She has published poetry in Canadian journals. And since 2008, she has worked as a freelance Dutch translator, senior translator, language specialist, and proof-reader. She has also traveled extensively in Europe, Australia, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia.

Lecture Series 3
The Finer Points of Listening to Music

Lecturer: Keith McCuaig

This lecture series will increase your enjoyment of music through a greater understanding of what you are hearing. Learn about a variety of musical forms and how to identify individual instruments through sound. Explore the use of production techniques and effects, and further develop your ears through in-depth guided listening sessions. A wide variety of popular genres will be covered, including rock, pop, blues, country, R&B, reggae, and more. Our analyses will not be overly technical, and you don’t need to have a musical background; all you need is a love of music.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Tuesdays, January 9th – February 13th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: With an M.A. in Music and Culture, and more than twenty years of experience as a musician, Keith McCuaig is a specialist in all things music and art. He loves exploring the histories of popular music, especially the interconnectedness of genres, and looking at the socio-cultural significance of music. Keith has extensive experience in researching, writing and teaching a variety of musicological topics; he has delivered guest lectures at two universities, presented at multiple international musicology conferences, and taught musicology courses through Carleton University and the University of Ottawa. From performing, writing, recording, and producing, to lecturing, giving music lessons, and working with community music programs such as Ottawa Bluesfest’s Blues in the Schools and Be in the Band, Keith’s life and passion is music.

Lecture Series 4
Serenissima Repubblica: The Art of Renaissance Venice – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Adriane Aboud

This lecture series will examine the unique artistic atmosphere of Venice during the Italian Renaissance. Rather than focusing on artistic development, this series will illustrate how the distinctive historical and political environment of Venice affected the art of the time. The first few sessions will examine particular aspects of Venetian society through art, culminating in two lectures, which analyze the visual program of the Great Council Hall in the Doge’s Palace. This lecture series will show not just what made the art unique, but how Venetians used art to promote the glory of “the most serene republic”.

Lectures and visual presentations

  • Days: Tuesdays, January 9th – February 13th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Adriane Aboud is an art history teacher at Heritage College. She received a Bachelor’s degree in History and Art History from McGill University in Montreal, and a Master’s agree in Art History from the University of Nottingham in England. She lived in Europe for two years during which she travelled extensively. Upon her return to Canada, she briefly took a job at the National Gallery of Canada before accepting her current post as a CEGEP teacher in Gatineau.

Lecture Series 5
Art Appreciation: Canadian Art (Daytime) – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Angela Marcus

The panorama of art presented in the expanded and updated Canadian Galleries at the National Gallery of Canada is the field of exploration for this series. We will begin with New France and follow the progress of Canada and its art through influences, practices, and artists to our current period. Portraiture, landscape, Group of Seven, Emily Carr, Lawren Harris, the Canadian Group of Painters, the Beaver Hall Group, The Woodland School, the Automatistes, and Painters Eleven are some of the classical genres and periods. Inuit Art and the development of First Nations practices represent added dynamism that enhances the varied story of Canadian art history.

Lectures and discussions

  • Days: Tuesdays, January 9th – February 13th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: National Gallery of Canada (NAG)
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
    • National Gallery entrance fee not included.
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Note: Please meet at the front entrance of the NAG.

Lecturer biography: Angela Marcus (BA Hons/78, MA/93) has taught in Art History/Art Appreciation for over two decades and has taught for several years in the Learning in Retirement program at Carleton University. She has been an independent researcher, art writer, and curator.

Lecture Series 6
Introduction to Neurological Disease

Lecturer: Ashley Thompson

This lecture series will provide an introduction to the nervous system, and will address introductory neuroscience topics such as brain organization, communication within the brain, and functional regions of the brain. The lecture series will culminate into a discussion of three of the most prevalent neurological diseases in today’s society: Stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease. Clinical symptoms of these diseases will be addressed, including biological, developmental, experiential, and environmental factors that contribute. We will further explore current and prospective treatments for these diseases in our discussion.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Wednesdays, January 10th – February 14th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Ashley Thompson (BSc, MHSc, PhD student) is a senior doctoral student in the Neuroscience department at Carleton University. In addition to her PhD research, Ashley is a contract instructor in the Neuroscience department, teaching Introduction to Neurological Disease (NEUR1203; a brand new course which Ashley had a large hand in designing!) in both the fall and winter terms this year.

Lecture Series 7
The Heart of Europe: A History of Central Europe – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Marcel Jesenský

Europe is a continent of extraordinary variety and diversity – geographically, ethnically, nationally, economically, and politically. Modern-day Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic, and Slovakia lie at the very centre of Europe and sometimes think of themselves as its very heart. Over the course of European history, peoples in Central Europe created their own independent states; they developed their individual national cultures and contributed to the general progress of European civilization. This lecture series explores the history of Central Europe since the ninth century, focusing on its political, cultural, and social aspects.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Wednesdays, January 10th – February 14th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Dr. Marcel Jesenský is a specialist on the United Nations, international relations, diplomacy and European history. He holds a Ph.D. in History (University of Ottawa). His book “The Slovak-Polish border, 1918-1947” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014) chronicles the legacy of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. He is teaching at the University of Ottawa and Carleton University, and his current research focuses on the United Nations under Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (2007-2016).

Lecture Series
The Heart of Europe: A History of Central Europe – Section II
Lecturer: Dr. Marcel Jesenský

Europe is a continent of extraordinary variety and diversity – geographically, ethnically, nationally, economically, and politically. Modern-day Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic, and Slovakia lie at the very centre of Europe and sometimes think of themselves as its very heart. Over the course of European history, peoples in Central Europe created their own independent states; they developed their individual national cultures and contributed to the general progress of European civilization. This lecture series explores the history of Central Europe since the ninth century, focusing on its political, cultural, and social aspects.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Wednesdays, January 10th – February 14th
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Dr. Marcel Jesenský is a specialist on the United Nations, international relations, diplomacy and European history. He holds a Ph.D. in History (University of Ottawa). His book “The Slovak-Polish border, 1918-1947” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014) chronicles the legacy of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference. He is teaching at the University of Ottawa and Carleton University, and his current research focuses on the United Nations under Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (2007-2016).

Lecture Series 8
Sensory Worlds: The Neural Basis of Animal Behaviour

Lecturer: Dr. Katie Lucas

How is an owl able to catch a mouse in darkness? How does a fish use electricity to sense its environment? How does a toad recognize a predator versus prey? What better way to learn about ourselves and gain inspiration and understanding from the natural world, than to look to nature’s sensory experts. This lecture series will explore the neural mechanisms underlying natural animal behaviour. We will focus on classic model systems in the field of neuroethology (i.e. the neural basis of animal behaviour), and look to past and present research to learn about how behaviour is controlled by nerve cells.

Lectures, discussions, and visual presentations

  • Days: Thursdays, January 11th – February 15th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Katie Lucas is a sensory neurobiologist, with a broad range of research experiences in neurophysiology, computational neuroscience, and biomechanics. She holds a B.Sc. Honours in Biology from Queen’s University, and a Master’s of Science from Carleton University, for which she was awarded the University Medal for Outstanding Graduate Work. Her Ph.D. research on active hearing in mosquitoes was completed at the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom, which led to a postdoctoral fellowship working with weakly electric fish at the University of Ottawa. Currently, Katie works in departments of Biology and Integrated Science, teaching neurobiology, human physiology, and science communication.

Lecture Series 9
From Longhouse to Lumber to Legislation: An Anecdotal History of Ottawa

Lecturer: Phil Jenkins

A series of six lively lectures combining the anecdotal, biographical, administrative, and infrastructural to provide a chronological social history of Ottawa, from the arrival of the First Nations to the region, through the arrival of the Europeans, to the present multi-cultural city. The philosophical approach to the story of Bytown/Ottawa running through the lectures is to see how each arriving group (Algonquin, French, and British) made use of the geographical setting of Ottawa. Each lecture is augmented by the extensive use of illustrations, photographs, and a song or two, all the songs having some aspect of Ottawa history as their theme.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, film clips, and a weekly song related to Ottawa history, performed by the lecturer

  • Days: Thursdays, January 11th – February 15th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Phil Jenkins returned to Ottawa from Liverpool in 1978, with an honours degree in Environmental Sciences and a Middle Years Teaching Certificate. He is a writer and performing musician. He has written over eight hundred columns on Ottawa’s story in the Ottawa Citizen since 1991, and four national bestsellers; Fields of Vision, An Acre of Time (an Ottawa history), River Song, and Beneath My Feet, as well as three commissioned local histories: The Library Book, Off the Shelf and A Better Heart. He teaches and lectures in writing and Ottawa history.

Lecture Series 10
Art Appreciation: Canadian Art (Evening) – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Angela Marcus

The panorama of art presented in the expanded and updated Canadian Galleries at the National Gallery of Canada is the field of exploration for this series. We will begin with New France and follow the progress of Canada and its art through influences, practices, and artists to our current period. Portraiture, landscape, Group of Seven, Emily Carr, Lawren Harris, the Canadian Group of Painters, the Beaver Hall Group, The Woodland School, the Automatistes, and Painters Eleven are some of the classical genres and periods. Inuit Art and the development of First Nations practices represent added dynamism that enhances the varied story of Canadian art history.

Lectures and discussions

  • Days: Thursdays, January 11th – February 15th
  • Time: 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
  • Location: National Gallery of Canada
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
    • NAG entrance is free on Thursdays after 5:00 p.m.
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Note: Please meet at the front entrance of the NAG.

Lecturer biography: Angela Marcus (BA Hons/78, MA/93) has taught in Art History/Art Appreciation for over two decades and has taught for several years in the Learning in Retirement program at Carleton University. She has been an independent researcher, art writer, and curator.

Lecture Series 11
How Nutrition Changes the Aging Brain – LECTURE SERIES FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Nafisa Jadavji

This lecture series will examine the role of vitamins and nutrients on neurological function during aging. An introduction to basic neurology and nutrition will be covered in the first two lectures. There will be a specific focus on neurology and how vitamins and nutrients affect normal aging and neurodegenerative disease processes in the brain. Topics covered throughout the series will include how nutrient and vitamin deficiencies affect Alzheimer’s disease, mild cognitive impairment, vascular cognitive impairment, stroke, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, as well as the impact of vitamin supplementation on brain function.

Lectures, discussions, visual presentations, and film clips

  • Days: Fridays, January 12th – February 16th
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Dr. Nafisa M. Jadavji is a Neuroscientist. Currently, she is postdoctoral fellow researcher and instructor at Carleton University and the University of Ottawa, in Ottawa, Canada. She completed her doctoral training at McGill University in Montréal, Canada and postdoctoral training at the Charité Medical University in Berlin, Germany. Her post-doctoral research focuses on understanding how dietary and genetic deficiencies in one carbon metabolism, specifically, folate metabolism, affects neurological function over the lifespan using a mouse model. Her research has been published in Behavioural Brain Research, Biochemical Journal, Neuroendocrinology, Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, Human Molecular Genetics, European Journal of Neuroscience, Journal of Pediatric Reviews, Neural Regeneration Research, Environmental Epigenetics, Neurobiology of disease, and Neuroscience. Dr. Jadavji has been funded by the Federation of European Neuroscience Society (Europe), NeuroWIND (Germany), Canadian Association for Neuroscience, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, National Science & Engineering Research Council (Canada), International Brain Research Organization, Parkinson’s disease Foundation (US), Burroughs Wellcome Fund (US) and Fonds de la recherché en santé Québec (Canada). She is a regular reviewer for the Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, Neurotoxicity Research, Journal of Molecular Medicine and Neuroscience. Currently, Dr. Jadavji is an Editorial member for Updates in Nutritional Disorders and Therapy and JSM Nutritional Disorders Journals. She is also the Chair of the Board of Directors for the Journal of Young Investigators (JYI) and a board member of the Canadian Society for Molecular Biosciences.

Lecture Series 12
A Brief History of Jazz: Duke, Dizzy, Miles, Monk, Mingus and More

Lecturer: Adrian Cho

This highly popular and acclaimed lecture series will demystify jazz by helping participants understand how jazz originated and evolved and how it was performed over the years. This will give participants the opportunity to appreciate jazz in its many forms. Key figures in the history of jazz, including Mile Davis, Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus, Gil Evans, Benny Goodman, and many others, will be covered. The lecturer will analyze jazz recordings with the class and provide live demonstrations with other professional jazz musicians.

Lectures, discussions, and film clips

  • Days: Fridays, January 12th – February 16th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building
  • Fee: $135.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants

Lecturer biography: Adrian Cho is a multi-instrumentalist who has been performing music for forty years. He is best known as the bassist and the artistic director of the Ottawa Jazz Orchestra, an acclaimed ensemble that brings together an impressive array of professional jazz and symphony musicians. Adrian performs across multiple musical genres in formats ranging from solo bass to large ensembles. Described by press, audiences, and collaborators as “a cool guide to hot jazz”, “a musical missionary”, “a gifted teacher”, “a visionary and true collaborator”, and “an extraordinary leader”, Adrian is the author of the acclaimed book, The Jazz Process: Collaboration, Innovation and Agility, and speaks frequently to corporate, academic and conference audiences throughout North America.

Writing Workshop 1
Remembering Through Reading: Stories From My Life – WRITING WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

We all have a story to tell. Often we think of a life story or memoir as a chronology of events. However, knowing where to begin can become so overwhelming that we put off writing the story at all. Re-collect, record, and share the stories from your life through the lens of reading. What books, songs, magazines, or journals played an important role in your life? How might writing about what we read give us a glimpse into who we were and who we have become? Bring your own writing instruments, where you will experiment with writing strategies using prompts, share your writing with others, and begin your collection of life-stories.

Workshop

  • Days: Tuesdays, January 9th – February 13th
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $195.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Note: It is not recommended that participants register in more than one writing workshop per session.

Lecturer biography: Dr. Anna Rumin is a native Montrealer whose identity has been in part shaped by the political landscape of her home province, her Russian roots, a passion for life-long learning that has been woven both formally in educational institutions and informally through travel, voracious reading, the belief that each person has a unique story to tell, and a near obsession with the outdoors be it in the forest, on a lake or a mountain. Regardless of who she is working with, Anna is committed to supporting those she leads in providing them with opportunities to set and meet their goals. Her guiding questions in both her professional and personal life are: “why am I doing what I am doing and how is that practice supported through research, experience, an ethic of caring, and wisdom?” Having moved to Ottawa in the fall of 2014, Anna continues to look for ways in which she can make a meaningful contribution to the community using the skills she has acquired in the journey that is her life.

Writing Workshop 2
My Life as a Museum: A Springboard for Memoir – WRITING WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

We all have a story to tell and very often the things that surround us – the telephone bills, photographs, old books, forgotten stamp collections, old cutlery, recipes – can be the seeds for memoir writing. Curate your life stories using the stuff/things/artifacts that surround you. This workshop will equip you with a safe space in which to begin writing these stories, and weekly prompts will encourage you to continue writing on your own between classes. Participants are encouraged to read They Left Us Everything by Plum Johnson before the beginning of this workshop.

Workshop

  • Days: Tuesdays, January 9th – February 13th
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $195.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Note: It is not recommended that participants register in more than one writing workshop per session.

Lecturer biography: Dr. Anna Rumin is a native Montrealer whose identity has been in part shaped by the political landscape of her home province, her Russian roots, a passion for life-long learning that has been woven both formally in educational institutions and informally through travel, voracious reading, the belief that each person has a unique story to tell, and a near obsession with the outdoors be it in the forest, on a lake or a mountain. Regardless of who she is working with, Anna is committed to supporting those she leads in providing them with opportunities to set and meet their goals. Her guiding questions in both her professional and personal life are: “why am I doing what I am doing and how is that practice supported through research, experience, an ethic of caring, and wisdom?” Having moved to Ottawa in the fall of 2014, Anna continues to look for ways in which she can make a meaningful contribution to the community using the skills she has acquired in the journey that is her life.

Language Workshop 1
Spanish Conversation for Travellers I – Section I – LANGUAGE WORKSHOP FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Ioana Dimitriu

This introductory Spanish language workshop aims at providing participants with grammatical and lexical elements that are essential for basic communication. Conversation topics will focus on travel and will include asking and giving directions, talking about food, accommodation, tourist attractions, shopping, and medical emergencies. Audio-visual materials include cultural components related to different parts of the Spanish-speaking world.

Workshop

  • Days: Tuesdays and Thursdays, January 9th – February 20th
    • No class Thursday, January 25th
  • Time: 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. (1.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 274, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $250.00 (HST included)
    • Workshop fee includes specialized printed materials.
  • Enrollment capacity: 14 participants
  • Note: There are no prerequisites to take this language workshop.

Lecturer biography: Ioana Dimitriu holds a Ph.D. in Spanish Literature and an M.A. in Spanish Comparative Linguistics from the University of Ottawa (2010; 2002). Her Doctoral Dissertation focused on the figure of the labyrinth as a literary metaphor in the fantastic prose by Argentine author Jorge Luis Borges, and by Romanian historian of religions Mircea Eliade. She worked as an Assistant to the Ambassador of Argentina to Canada, and as a Spanish Sessional Lecturer at the University of Ottawa (2001-2008) and at Carleton University (2010 – 2017). Ioana also has several years of experience teaching Spanish to adults who learn the language for travel purposes. Ioana’s personal interests include studying theology, exploring other cultures through reading and travel, and kayaking on Loon Lake in South-Eastern Ontario.

Language Workshop 2
Spanish Conversation for Travellers I – Section II

Lecturer: Ioana Dimitriu

This introductory Spanish language workshop aims at providing participants with grammatical and lexical elements that are essential for basic communication. Conversation topics will focus on travel and will include asking and giving directions, talking about food, accommodation, tourist attractions, shopping, and medical emergencies. Audio-visual materials include cultural components related to different parts of the Spanish-speaking world.

Workshop

  • Days: Tuesdays and Thursdays, January 9th – February 20th
    • No class Thursday, January 25th
  • Time: 11:15 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. (1.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 274, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $250.00 (HST included)
    • Workshop fee includes specialized printed materials.
  • Enrollment capacity: 14 participants
  • Note: There are no prerequisites to take this language workshop.

Lecturer biography: Ioana Dimitriu holds a Ph.D. in Spanish Literature and an M.A. in Spanish Comparative Linguistics from the University of Ottawa (2010; 2002). Her Doctoral Dissertation focused on the figure of the labyrinth as a literary metaphor in the fantastic prose by Argentine author Jorge Luis Borges, and by Romanian historian of religions Mircea Eliade. She worked as an Assistant to the Ambassador of Argentina to Canada, and as a Spanish Sessional Lecturer at the University of Ottawa (2001-2008) and at Carleton University (2010 – 2017). Ioana also has several years of experience teaching Spanish to adults who learn the language for travel purposes. Ioana’s personal interests include studying theology, exploring other cultures through reading and travel, and kayaking on Loon Lake in South-Eastern Ontario.

Language Workshop 3
Spanish Conversation for Travellers I – Section III

Lecturer: Ioana Dimitriu

This introductory Spanish language workshop aims at providing participants with grammatical and lexical elements that are essential for basic communication. Conversation topics will focus on travel and will include asking and giving directions, talking about food, accommodation, tourist attractions, shopping, and medical emergencies. Audio-visual materials include cultural components related to different parts of the Spanish-speaking world.

Workshop

  • Days: Wednesdays and Fridays, January 10th – February 23rd
    • No class Friday, January 19th and Wednesday, February 21st
  • Time: 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. (1.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 274, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $250.00 (HST included)
    • Workshop fee includes specialized printed materials.
  • Enrollment capacity: 14 participants
  • Note: There are no prerequisites to take this language workshop.

Lecturer biography: Ioana Dimitriu holds a Ph.D. in Spanish Literature and an M.A. in Spanish Comparative Linguistics from the University of Ottawa (2010; 2002). Her Doctoral Dissertation focused on the figure of the labyrinth as a literary metaphor in the fantastic prose by Argentine author Jorge Luis Borges, and by Romanian historian of religions Mircea Eliade. She worked as an Assistant to the Ambassador of Argentina to Canada, and as a Spanish Sessional Lecturer at the University of Ottawa (2001-2008) and at Carleton University (2010 – 2017). Ioana also has several years of experience teaching Spanish to adults who learn the language for travel purposes. Ioana’s personal interests include studying theology, exploring other cultures through reading and travel, and kayaking on Loon Lake in South-Eastern Ontario.

Language Workshop 4
Spanish Conversation for Travellers II

Lecturer: Ioana Dimitriu

This language workshop is intended as a refresher for students who have already acquired basic knowledge of Spanish. The main conversation topics will focus on travelling. A variety of short texts and audio-visual materials will be used to familiarize participants with the diverse socioeconomic and cultural realities of the Spanish-speaking world. Practical for people who wish to travel or for those who have travelled to Spanish-speaking countries and would like to share their experiences, while improving their oral Spanish. This series builds on the knowledge acquired in Spanish Conversation for Travellers I, yet, students who have not taken the first series are welcome, provided that they have mastered basic communication skills in Spanish.

Workshop

  • Days: Tuesdays and Thursdays, January 9th – February 20th
    • No class Thursday, January 25th
  • Time: 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. (1.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 274, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $250.00 (HST included)
    • Workshop fee includes specialized printed materials.
  • Enrollment capacity: 14 participants
  • Note: There are no prerequisites to take this language workshop.

Lecturer biography: Ioana Dimitriu holds a Ph.D. in Spanish Literature and an M.A. in Spanish Comparative Linguistics from the University of Ottawa (2010; 2002). Her Doctoral Dissertation focused on the figure of the labyrinth as a literary metaphor in the fantastic prose by Argentine author Jorge Luis Borges, and by Romanian historian of religions Mircea Eliade. She worked as an Assistant to the Ambassador of Argentina to Canada, and as a Spanish Sessional Lecturer at the University of Ottawa (2001-2008) and at Carleton University (2010 – 2017). Ioana also has several years of experience teaching Spanish to adults who learn the language for travel purposes. Ioana’s personal interests include studying theology, exploring other cultures through reading and travel, and kayaking on Loon Lake in South-Eastern Ontario.

Language Workshop 5
Basic Conversational French

Lecturer: Claire Owen

Taught in French for beginners and those who may have had some previous exposure to the language but who have difficulty using it in everyday communication. Emphasis is on oral expression and comprehension; limited secondary focus on reading and writing. Learning is supported by a variety of audio-visual methods, including dialogue repetition, images, video clips, song lyrics, worksheets, etc. Activities include oral practice in pairs/groups, travel scenarios, cultural activities, and grammar exercises.

Workshop

  • Days: Wednesdays and Fridays, January 10th – February 23rd
    • No class Friday, January 19th and Wednesday, February 21st
  • Time: 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. (1.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 274, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $250.00 (HST included)
    • Workshop fee includes specialized printed materials.
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Note: There are no prerequisites to take this language workshop.

Lecturer biography: Claire Owen is an instructor and researcher at Carleton University in the School of Linguistics and Language Studies (SLaLS); she holds an M.A. in applied linguistics and a B.A. in French. Originally from Victoria, BC, she spent a few years living in Quebec before moving to the bilingual cities of Ottawa/Gatineau in 2009. She began teaching at Carleton in the French Department in 2010, and currently teaches American Sign Language in SLaLS. Ms. Owen has over a decade of teaching and research experience in French and several other languages; she also does freelance transcription, translation and academic editing in both French and English. When not teaching, she works part-time as assistant director of the Algonquian Linguistic Atlas (www.atlas-ling.ca), a research team that works alongside Indigenous language speakers to develop resources for teaching, literacy, documentation, and ultimately the transmission of these languages to future generations.

Language Workshop 6
Introduction to American Sign Language

Lecturer: Josée-Anna Tanner

This language series will be “hands-on” and will introduce participants to basic communication skills of American Sign Language. The series will begin with learning the manual alphabet, and then expand into common verbs and signs that will allow people to communicate about immediate needs and daily activities. Examples of units covered will include family, time, routines, and basic ASL grammar and sentence structure. Participants will also learn how to incorporate their existing gestures into ASL communication and discover a bit about d/Deaf culture and d/Deaf history. This is a language series for anyone interested in breaking the sound barrier.

Workshop

  • Days: Wednesdays and Fridays, January 10th – February 23rd
    • No class Friday, January 19th and Wednesday, February 21st
  • Time: 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. (1.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 274, Residence Commons Building
  • Fee: $250.00 (HST included)
    • Workshop fee includes specialized printed materials.
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Note: There are no prerequisites to take this language workshop.

Lecturer biography: Josée-Anna Tanner is a third year doctoral student in Applied Linguistics and Discourse Studies. She has a lifelong love of both art and language; she completed her B.A. Honours in Art History before moving on to study Applied Linguistics, specializing in gesture and visual language. She has been teaching American Sign Language at Carleton for five years.