Winter 2020 Session

The Winter 2020 Session will feature twenty-one lecture series, four writing workshops, and four language workshops, as detailed below. (You can also view and print a PDF version of Learning in Retirement’s Winter 2020 Session brochure.)

Note that our program now has TWO locations: main campus, and the new Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre. Please check your lecture or workshop’s location carefully. Our CDCC page has important details about transportation and parking options/costs.

Parking symbol legend:
Parking legend. Double PP letters indicate prepaid virtual parking and PAYG indicates pay-as-you-go metered parking is available on a first-come first-served basis.

See our parking page for further details.

Lecture Series
1. The Scientific Study of Sleep and Dreaming – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
2. The History of the Struggle for a Homeland in Judea/Israel and Palestine – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
3. A Brief History of Britain – CANCELLED
4. History of the Guitar – CANCELLED
5. Ottawology: A Critical Study of the Nation’s Capital
6. Art Appreciation: Renaissance to Romanticism (Daytime) – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
7. A Sample of Logical Fallacies
8. Introduction to Neurological Disease – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
9. Truth and Truthiness in an Age of Propaganda – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
10. A Global History of the Age of Oil: Past, Present, and Future – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
11. Introduction to Buddhism: A Religion or a Way of Life? – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
12. Film Music: The Sounds of Hollywood
13. Selected Themes in Viewing Art at the National Gallery (Morning) – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
14. Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in a Nutshell – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
15. France: 1914 Onwards – CANCELLED
16. Selected Themes in Viewing Art at the National Gallery (Afternoon) – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
17. Art Appreciation: Renaissance to Romanticism (Evening) – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
18. Plagues to Pandemics: Understanding and Controlling Infectious Disease
19. Ecclesiastes and the Meaning of Life – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
20. Understanding Grief and Loss
21. Famous Artists of the Italian Renaissance – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Writing Workshop
1. Writing the Stories of My Life: Remembering My Mother – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
2. The Personal Journal: A Springboard for Memoir – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
3. Writing the Stories of My Life: Remembering My Father  – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
4. Stories From Our Lives: An Introduction to Memoir Writing – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Language Workshops
1. Italian for Travellers Level I, Part I – CANCELLED
2. Italian for Travellers Level I, Part II – CANCELLED
3. Spanish for Travellers Level III
4. Elementary Spanish for Travellers Level I – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN


Lecture Series

Lecture Series 1
The Scientific Study of Sleep and Dreaming – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Misha Sokolov

A healthy human being will spend approximately 1/3 of their life asleep. Considering that during this time we are not only unproductive, but also vulnerable to predators, sleep must be of utmost importance to our survival. In this lecture series, we will explore the world of sleep and dreams. In the first half, we will cover the physiological and adaptive aspects of sleep. In the second half, we will dive into the scientific study of dreams and dream interpretation. Further, we will apply our knowledge, in group discussions about dream interpretation.

  • Days: Mondays, January 13 – February 24 (no class February 17)
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Misha SokolovLecturer biography: Misha Sokolov received his undergraduate degree from University of Ottawa in Psychology, where his research focused on emotional perception and emotional mimicry in the non-suicidal self injury population. Following that, Misha completed the Master of Cognitive Science program at Carleton University, focusing on emotional language production in the psychopathic population. He is currently a PhD candidate in the Department of Psychology at Carleton University, where his research is focused on development and validation of psychometric tools and methods used by researchers to study personality traits associated with psychopaths. Most recently, Misha has began work with the Department of National Defense researching psychometric methodology. Aside from research, Misha takes immense meaning from teaching courses for the wonderful Ottawa area students of all ages; and has a deep personal interest in philosophy of psychology, and philosophy of science.

Register here, on or after November 19th, 2019

Lecture Series 2
The History of the Struggle for a Homeland in Judea/Israel and Palestine – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Rabbi Steven Garten

In this interactive series, we will use original and translated documents to explore the long road toward Independent Homelands for two peoples. Starting with the issue of geographic identity vs. political identity vs. religious claims, we will explore the historical intersection between world events and the drive for national identity. Though the events of the recent past occupy the front pages and 24-hour news outlets, we will focus on the history that has lead to these current events. Participants will be encouraged to ask questions and take part in reasoned and respectful conversation.

  • Days: Mondays, January 13 – February 24 (no class February 17)
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 17, Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre (355 Cooper Street)
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 25 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Lecturer biography: Steven Garten was born in New York City. He earned a BA in American history at Rutgers University. He was ordained a Rabbi at Hebrew Union College Jewish Institute of Religion. He also received a master’s degree and Doctor of Divinity from the same institution. While serving as a religious educator in Toronto he earned an MA in Education from the University of Toronto. He served as Rabbi of Temple Israel Ottawa for 19 years. He has lived in Israel on two occasions and has led more than a dozen tours, including interfaith tours, to Israel and the West Bank. His interests in the winter are reading mysteries and history. In the summer he plays at playing golf.

Register here, on or after November 19th, 2019

Lecture Series 3
A Brief History of Britain

Lecturer: Dr. Marcel Jesensky – CANCELLED

This lecture series reviews some of the main events in the history of Britain, from the earliest Roman period to the early twenty-first century. The dramatic story of this ancient society includes of course the British Empire, and its immense influence on the global geopolitical landscape. We will also address additional components of Britishness: Crown, Parliament, Protestantism, and the Industrial Revolution. As the destabilising effects of our globalised world test the enduring cohesiveness of the country, the historical quest for the idea of Britain

Lecture Series 4
History of the Guitar – CANCELLED 

Lecturer: Wayne Eagles

The guitar is an ancient instrument with a history that can be traced back over 4000 years. We will look at the instrument’s ancestry, as well as guitar-specific music created over this long history. In addition to covering the instrument’s evolving design and development, we will examine important composers, players, and established pedagogies. Exploring a range of cultural traditions, this lecture series will highlight many popular music styles, from earliest traditions to formal concert music. Together we’ll delve into development and practice, from the earliest acoustic through contemporary electric and current digital design. Brief guitar demonstrations will be performed.

Lecture Series 5
Ottawology: A Critical Study of the Nation’s Capital

Lecturer: Dr. Tonya Davidson

How can the cholera epidemic of 1832 and the Spanish Flu help us contextualize Ottawa’s response to the opioid epidemic? How would a feminist sociological analysis help us make sense of both the flannel that floods the Glebe every game day and the “Log Driver’s Waltz”? This series draws on urban sociology, history, and human geography to offer a series of unique takes on Ottawa as both a national capital and a living city. We will use multiple perspectives, allowing Ottawa to both be a lens through which to understand broader national processes, and a city in its own right. Note: this series is repeated from Spring 2019, but takes place entirely in the classroom for the Winter 2020 Session

  • Days: Tuesdays, January 14 – February 18
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking icon
  • Fee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR Lecturer Tonya DavidsonLecturer biography: Tonya Davidson is an Instructor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Carleton University. Her research interests have focused on questions of memory, national belonging, and the built environment. More specifically, Tonya has spent many years studying the social lives of statues in Ottawa. Her sociological research has been published in Journal of Canadian Studies, Space and Culture, The Public Historian, and Topia. With Ondine Park, she co-edited Ecologies of Affect: Placing Nostalgia, Desire, and Hope (2011, Wilfrid Laurier University Press). She is currently working with Ondine Park on a co-edited book for sociology students, called Seasonal Sociology (University of Toronto Press, forthcoming). In her free time she likes to give walking tours of Ottawa. Read what LinR participants have said about Dr. Tonya Davidson.

Register here, on or after November 19th, 2019

Lecture Series 6
Art Appreciation: Renaissance to Romanticism (Daytime) – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Angela Marcus

Original artworks in the permanent collection of European Art at the National Gallery of Canada will form the path for this tour and talk. It will begin with an early Renaissance mini altarpiece, and end with paintings of Romantic themes and styles of the 19th century. We will see the art of several countries, as this lecture series will encompass the Renaissance, Mannerist, Baroque, Rococo, and Neo-Classical periods, as well as Realism. Iconography and subject matter will be far-ranging, as will the political context of the various periods. Analysis will be led by the lecturer and enhanced by group participation and discussion.

  • Days: Tuesdays, January 14 – February 18
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: National Gallery of Canada
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $140.00 (HST included)
    • National Gallery entrance fee not included
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Note: Please meet at the front entrance of the National Gallery of Canada.
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Angela MarcusLecturer biography: Angela Marcus (BA Hons/78 MA/93) has taught in Art History and Art Appreciation for over two decades. She has taught for several years for the Learning in Retirement Program. She has been an independent researcher, art writer, and curator.

Register here, on or after November 19th, 2019

Lecture Series 7
A Sample of Logical Fallacies

Lecturer: Dr. Kevin Cheung

What do “ad hominem”, “in terrorem”, “non sequitur”, “post hoc ergo propter hoc”, and “tu quoque” have in common? These Latin phrases refer to the logical fallacies (flaws in arguments) so ubiquitous and overlooked in our daily lives. In this lecture series, we’ll examine logical fallacies illustrated with examples that range from humorous to serious, mundane to life-altering. You’ll learn how to recognize such fallacies in the speech and writing of others (and how to avoid making these errors yourself). The list of logical fallacies to be discussed will remain a secret because once you know the list, you will instantly become an expert on the subject! (Non sequitur).

  • Days: Tuesdays, January 14 – February 18
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Kevin CheungLecturer biography: Dr. Kevin Cheung has been a faculty member of the School of Mathematics and Statistics at Carleton University since 2005. After completing his PhD at the University of Waterloo in 2003, he spent two years at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) Postdoctoral Fellow. His current academic interests include discrete optimization, designing and developing teaching tools, and exploiting technology to help students attain mastery. Read what LinR participants have said about Dr. Kevin Cheung.

Register here, on or after November 19th, 2019

Lecture Series 8
Introduction to Neurological Disease – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Ashley Thompson

This series will introduce neuroscience (the study of the brain), and will begin to explore some of the most common neurological diseases, including symptoms, pathology (what processes are going on/going wrong in the brain), and treatment. In this lecture series, we will examine neurological diseases such as stroke, Alzheimer disease, and traumatic brain injuries/ concussions. We will discuss current advances in the research relating to these diseases, and by the end of the course, participants should feel confident discussing these conditions and their relevance.

  • Days: Wednesdays, January 8 – February 5 (5 weeks)
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline – Coming soon!

Lecturer biography: Ashley Thompson is an instructor in the Neuroscience department at Carleton University. She teaches Introduction to Neurological disease and the Honours workshop for fourth year students. Ashley completed her PhD in Neuroscience at Carleton focusing on Parkinson’s disease (PD). Her doctoral research used substances that naturally occur in the brain to alter the environment of the regions known to be vulnerable in PD in order to protect those neurons from degeneration and death. Ashley is also a member of the Society for Neuroscience (Ottawa chapter), a volunteer organization that seeks to promote the study of neuroscience to youth through a variety of outreach initiatives. Ashley is the coordinator of one such event, the Ottawa Regional Brain Bee, a neuroscience trivia competition for high school students that offers a paid summer internship in a neuroscience lab at Carleton as its top prize. Read what LinR participants have said about Ashley Thompson.

Register here, on or after November 19th, 2019

Lecture Series 9
Truth and Truthiness in an Age of Propaganda – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Randal Marlin

Accusations of propaganda, mind manipulation and “fake news” abound today. Even before the arrival of Donald Trump, modern times have been dubbed “the Age of Propaganda.” This lecture series broadly traces the history of persuasion from ancient rhetoric to war propaganda and public relations dupery. Is modern propaganda of a different order from earlier forms of persuasion, by virtue of social science developments and the arrival of mass media? George Orwell’s insights into distortion of language, control of mass media and infiltration of social media by powerful political and commercial interests will be addressed. So too will the ethics of deception and balancing of free speech concerns with the need to protect against, among other things, hate propaganda

  • Days: Wednesdays, January 15 – February 19
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 17, Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre (355 Cooper Street)
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 30 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Randal MarlinLecturer biography: Dr. Randal Marlin (AB Princeton, MA McGill, PhD Toronto) is currently Adjunct Research Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Carleton University. His research has focused on existentialism, phenomenology and philosophy of law. and more recently on propaganda. In 1979-80, assisted by a Department of National Defence Fellowship, he spent a sabbatical year at the Université de Bordeaux to study under Professor Jacques Ellul, a leading theorist of propaganda. Since then he has taught a “Truth and Propaganda” credit course regularly at Carleton. His book, Propaganda and the Ethics of Persuasion, now in its second edition, has been widely noted. He is on the Board of the International Jacques Ellul Society and serves as an advisor to the Association Internationale Jacques Ellul.

Register here, on or after November 19th, 2019

Lecture Series 10
A Global History of the Age of Oil: Past, Present, and Future – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Ian Wereley

How did oil come to dictate nearly all aspects of our daily lives? In this lecture series, we will explore the history of oil from the ancient period to the present day. Along this journey, we will visit the major oil producing countries of the world while examining the key people, places, and events that have shaped the story of oil. The ultimate goal in this series is to equip participants from all backgrounds, politics, and perspectives with the knowledge necessary to make informed decisions about oil and its future.

  • Days: Wednesdays, January 15 – February 19
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Ian WereleyLecturer biography: Ian Wereley originally hails from Brockville, Ontario, and is currently living in Aylmer, Quebec with his wife and son. He is a Postdoctoral Associate at the Calgary Institute for the Humanities, Calgary, and Adjunct Curator of the History of Energy at the Canada Science and Technology Museum, Ottawa. His research explores the social and cultural history of oil in the United Kingdom and Canada during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and seeks to uncover lessons for navigating our own changing energy landscapes. He has recently published a study on the history of energy anthropomorphosis, titled King Coal versus Prince Petroleo: Imagining Oil, Energy, and Transition in Early Twentieth-Century Britain (Graves & Beard, Routledge, 2019), and is working on a book manuscript titled Imagining the Age of Oil: British Petroleum, Imperialism, and the Commercial Conquest of Persia, 1865-1925. In his spare time, he teaches a second-year university course called “A History of Oil: Science, Technology, Culture, and Conflict,” which utilizes an array of digital technologies to convey information about the past, present, and future of oil.

Register here, on or after November 19th, 2019

Lecture Series 11
Introduction to Buddhism: A Religion or a Way of Life? – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Tan Ngo

Today, Buddhist temples are seen everywhere in North America. To answer the question if Buddhism is a religion or a way of life, this series helps you to understand the historical development of Buddhism from its beginning to the present. Participants will learn two main Buddhist traditions, Mahayana and Theravada, and the essence of Buddhist teaching. You will be introduced to a Buddhist psychological system, and will discuss Mindfulness-Based Intervention programs that help to reduce stress and enhance well-being. Guided meditation will be practiced at the beginning of each class for 15 minutes.

  • Days: Wednesdays, January 15 – February 19
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 17, Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre (355 Cooper Street)
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 30 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Tan NgoLecturer biography: Tan was born in Vietnam and started his Buddhist monkhood at the age of 8. After the death of his teacher, Tan left the monastery and joined the South Vietnamese army in 1971 as a lieutenant. After the fall of Saigon in 1975, Tan was confined in several concentration camps in Vietnam. After 3 years in the camps, he escaped as part of the boat people and settled in Ottawa in 1978. After retirement, Tan returned to monkhood in 2011, and began his PhD studies in Political Science at Carleton in the fall of 2016. He has an MA in Religion and Public Life from Carleton University and a BA in Psychology from the University of Ottawa. Presently, Tan is a teaching assistant to first year political science courses. In 2017, he was nominated for an Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award. Tan’s research interests lie primarily in comparative politics and public affairs and policy analysis. His Buddhist practice is rooted in Mahayana tradition.

Register here, on or after November 19th, 2019

Lecture Series 12
Film Music: The Sounds of Hollywood

Lecturer: Keith McCuaig

Music is a crucial component of virtually all Hollywood films. The sensation of suspense, joy or sadness that a film audience might feel is not only reflected in the music, but often dictated by the music. This series will cover the use of music in film from the silent era to the present. Film techniques and their relation to the score or soundtrack will also be discussed, as will some of the most prominent Hollywood composers. Each class will feature plenty of examples from films.

  • Days: Thursdays, January 16 – February 13 (5 weeks)
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Keith McCuaigLecturer biography: With an MA in Music and Culture, and over 20 years’ experience as a musician, Keith McCuaig is dedicated to all things music and art. He loves exploring the histories of popular music, especially the interconnectedness of genres, and the socio-cultural significance of music. Keith has extensive experience in researching, writing and teaching a variety of music-related topics; he’s taught musicology courses through Carleton University and the University of Ottawa, and presented at international musicology conferences. From performing, writing, recording, and producing, to lecturing, giving music lessons, and working with community music programs (such as Ottawa Bluesfest’s Blues in the Schools and Be in the Band), Keith’s life and passion is music. Read what LinR participants have said about Keith McCuaig.

Register here, on or after August 8th, 2019

Lecture Series 13
Selected Themes in Viewing Art at the National Gallery (Morning) – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Maria Martin

Each week we’ll gather at the National Gallery of Canada to explore a new theme with a light-hearted approach: snow and summer, pre-Confederation Art, 17th to 20th century French landscape art, architecture in art, love, and contemporary art. Lectures and discussions will take place in front of selected works in the Gallery’s collection. The lectures are geared toward people who wish to develop their knowledge and comfort level when viewing and discussing art. Participants should come away from the lectures with a better understanding of, and appreciation for, many interesting pieces of Canada’s national art collection.

  • Days: Thursdays, January 16 – February 20
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: National Gallery of Canada
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $140.00 (HST included)
    • National Gallery entrance fee not included
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Note: Please meet at the front entrance of the National Gallery of Canada.
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Maria MartinLecturer biography: Maria Martin has studied and worked in the Arts for many years. She holds a Master’s degree in the History of Art from Queen’s University, and a Bachelor’s degree in Art History from Carleton University. Maria has worked as a Manager with the federal government, and previously worked at the Canada Council for the Arts as an Art Consultant at the Council’s Art Bank, and as an Education Officer and Guide at the National Gallery of Canada.

Register here, on or after November 19th, 2019

Lecture Series 14
Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in a Nutshell – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN

Lecturer: Dr. Zeba Crook

They say that religion is one of those topics that is inappropriate for the supper table. Thankfully, we’re not going to be having supper! Since every second news item seems to feature Jews, Christians, and Muslims, and sometimes all three, we need to be able to talk about these “religions of a single god” in an informed way. This lecture series will very briefly summarize the histories, beliefs, and common practices of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Our approach will be historical, critical and respectful.

  • Days: Thursdays, January 16 – February 20
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Zeba CrookLecturer biography: Zeba Crook holds a PhD in Theology (2003) from the University of St. Michael’s College at the University of Toronto. He was trained as a specialist in early Christian social history. But coming to Carleton required a new teaching area — “western religion” — which has become another specialization for him. He has taught “western religion” to over 8000 students at Carleton University since 2003, and recently published a textbook on the subject.

Register here, on or after November 19th, 2019

Lecture Series 15
France: 1914 Onwards – CANCELLED
Lecturer: Dr. Marcel Jesenský

France holds a unique status in the world. The “Hexagone” is a driving force for European integration and enjoys, with Great Britain and Germany, the status of first among equals in the European Union. From cinema and theatre to literature and philosophy, from high fashion to luxury manufacture to some of the world’s truly great cuisine, France has been a global touchstone of both the arts and the art of living (and eating) well. This lecture series offers a history of modern France, an extraordinary nation, with detailed analyses of politics, society, and culture.

Lecture Series 16
Selected Themes in Viewing Art at the National Gallery (Afternoon) – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Maria Martin

Each week we’ll gather at the National Gallery of Canada to explore a new theme with a light-hearted approach: snow and summer, pre-Confederation Art, 17th to 20th century French landscape art, architecture in art, love, and contemporary art. Lectures and discussions will take place in front of selected works in the Gallery’s collection. The lectures are geared toward people who wish to develop their knowledge and comfort level when viewing and discussing art. Participants should come away from the lectures with a better understanding of, and appreciation for, many interesting pieces of Canada’s national art collection.

  • Days: Thursdays, January 16 – February 20
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: National Gallery of Canada
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $140.00 (HST included)
    • National Gallery entrance fee not included
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Note: Please meet at the front entrance of the National Gallery of Canada.
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Maria MartinLecturer biography: Maria Martin has studied and worked in the Arts for many years. She holds a Master’s degree in the History of Art from Queen’s University, and a Bachelor’s degree in Art History from Carleton University. Maria has worked as a Manager with the federal government, and previously worked at the Canada Council for the Arts as an Art Consultant at the Council’s Art Bank, and as an Education Officer and Guide at the National Gallery of Canada.

Register here, on or after November 19th, 2019

Lecture Series 17
Art Appreciation: Renaissance to Romanticism (Evening) – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Angela Marcus

Original artworks in the permanent collection of European Art at the National Gallery of Canada will form the path for this tour and talk. It will begin with an early Renaissance mini altarpiece, and end with paintings of Romantic themes and styles of the 19th century. We will see the art of several countries, as this lecture series will encompass the Renaissance, Mannerist, Baroque, Rococo, and Neo-Classical periods, as well as Realism. Iconography and subject matter will be far-ranging, as will the political context of the various periods. Analysis will be led by the lecturer and enhanced by group participation and discussion.

  • Days: Thursdays, January 16 – February 20
  • Time: 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
  • Location: National Gallery of Canada
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $140.00 (HST included)
    • Free entrance to the National Gallery on Thursday evenings
  • Enrollment capacity: 20 participants
  • Note: Please meet at the front entrance of the National Gallery of Canada.
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Angela MarcusLecturer biography: Angela Marcus (BA Hons/78 MA/93) has taught in Art History and Art Appreciation for over two decades. She has taught for several years for the Learning in Retirement Program. She has been an independent researcher, art writer, and curator.

Register here, on or after November 19th, 2019

Lecture Series 18
Plagues to Pandemics: Understanding and Controlling Infectious Disease
Lecturer: Dr. Alan Mortimer

From smallpox and plague to influenza, AIDS and Ebola, infectious diseases have shaped our politics, our built environment and of course our life expectancy. In recent years we have seen the return of infectious diseases we thought we had controlled. We will trace our fight to protect ourselves from these unseen killers by studying a variety of diseases from smallpox, cholera and plague to influenza, HIV, and Ebola. We will discuss re-emerging diseases: tuberculosis, measles and polio. Finally, we will address remaining challenges in the control and eradication of infectious disease, particularly in developing countries. Note: This is an updated version of a similar lecture series last given in 2017.

  • Days: Fridays, January 17 – February 21
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Alan MortimerLecturer biography: Dr. Alan Mortimer graduated from Carleton University (MSc in Medical Physics) and Guy’s Hospital Medical School, London, England (PhD in Medicine). He joined the research staff of the National Research Council of Canada in 1975, specializing in medical ultrasound. In 1986 he moved to the Canadian Space Agency, and became Chief Scientist, Life and Microgravity Sciences in 1989, responsible for all life sciences and physical sciences research. Dr. Mortimer accepted the position of Director of the Centre for Biologics Research, Health Canada (later the Centre for Vaccines Evaluation) in 2002. Here he was responsible for all research in biologic therapies as well as the approval and testing of all vaccines provided to Canadians. He currently is a consultant providing strategic advice to several government departments. Read what LinR participants have said about Dr. Alan Mortimer.

Register here, on or after November 19th, 2019

Lecture Series 19
Ecclesiastes and the Meaning of Life – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Jane Dawson

What does the Book of Ecclesiastes have to tell us about the meaning of life? This lecture series explores what is often considered the most enigmatic book of the Hebrew Bible as a guide for reflecting on the messy realities of our lives and the world around us. We will explore the socio-historical, theological, literary and existential features of the text, along with its many echoes in the arts and culture over the ages. Although often seen as a pessimistic book, Ecclesiastes offers a rich source of insight into life’s perplexities and how to live more fully.

  • Days: Fridays, January 17 – February 21
  • Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 17, Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre (355 Cooper Street)
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 30 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Jane DawsonLecturer biography: Jane Dawson studied classical history and adult education at the University of British Columbia before joining the Faculty of Education at St. Francis Xavier University in 2000. She has since widened her studies and professional practice to include contemplative spirituality and biblical scholarship as a basis for critical reflection and dialogue. She currently works for the United Church of Canada as Minister Supporting Communities of Faith, Clusters and Networks. She previously taught a Learning in Retirement series on Mysticism and Post-Modernity.

Register here, on or after November 19th, 2019

Lecture Series 20
Understanding Grief and Loss
Lecturer: Marie-Eve Pinard

We can’t take away our own or others’ emotional pain. However, understanding the grieving process goes a long way in supporting people going through this natural experience. In this series, you will be introduced to the topics of grief and loss and how they impact people around us. Through lectures, activities and discussions, you will learn about and apply different grief and loss theories, while also learning how to best support yourself and others through the grieving process. The topic of palliative care will also be explored.

Note: This series is not intended for people seeking support for a recent loss.Those seeking grief support are encouraged to explore resources such as eMentalHealth and bfo-ottawa.org.

  • Days: Fridays, January 17 – February 28 (no class February 14)
  • Time: 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
  • Location: Room 17, Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre (355 Cooper Street)
  • Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is availableFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 30 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR Lecturer Marie-Eve PinardLecturer biography: Marie-Eve completed her Bachelor’s of Social Work at McGill in 2005 and later completed her Master’s of Social Work at the University of Ottawa. She worked at the Ottawa Hospital on the General Surgery Unit, then at the Palliative Care Unit at Elisabeth Bruyere Hospital in 2011. Marie-Eve has been the Social Worker for Palliative Care since then. In addition, she has been teaching at Carleton University since 2013, such as the Grief and Loss course at the School of Social Work. Marie-Eve has also acted as Faculty Liaison for several groups of students who have completed their Social Work placements in agencies in our community.

Register here, on or after November 19th, 2019

Lecture Series 21
Famous Artists of the Italian Renaissance – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Adriane Aboud

This lecture series will examine the art of some of the most famous artists of the Italian Renaissance. The lectures will be organized chronologically so participants will come to understand and recognize not only each artist’s personal style, but also an overall view of the evolution of renaissance styles and subjects. The series will begin with early artists such as Botticelli, move through well-known figures like Michelangelo, and culminate in the works of the mannerists Bronzino and Parmigianino.

  • Days: Fridays, January 17 – February 21
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
  • Location: Room 124, Leeds House Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $140.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 55 participants
  • Lecture series outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Adriane Aboud as MedusaLecturer biography: Adriane Aboud is an art history teacher at Heritage College. She received a Bachelor’s degree in History and Art History from McGill University in Montreal, and a Master’s degree in Art History from the University of Nottingham in England. She lived in Europe for two years during which time she traveled extensively. Upon her return to Canada she briefly took a job at the National Gallery of Canada before accepting her current post as a CEGEP teacher in Gatineau. Read what LinR participants have said about Adriane Aboud.

Register here, on or after November 19th, 2019

Writing Workshops

Writing Workshop 1
Writing the Stories of My Life: Remembering My Mother – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

We all have a story to tell. In these workshops you are invited to re-collect, record and share the stories from your life through a specific lens. How do we capture our mother in a single story and is that even possible? What are the stories we want to remember, share and honour? We will work at isolating the small, rare and authentic stories that most effectively show who she was/is. How might writing about our mothers give us a glimpse into who we are, who we were and who we have become? Please prepare by collecting photographs and “artifacts” that you associate with your mother.

  • Days: Tuesdays, January 14 – February 18
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $200.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Writing workshop outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Anna RuminLecturer biography: Dr. Anna Rumin is a native Montrealer whose identity has been shaped by the political landscape of her home province, her Russian roots, a passion for life-long learning that has been woven both formally in academia and informally through travel, voracious reading and writing, and a love for the stories hidden in our natural world. Her interest in narrative inquiry stems from her belief that not only do we all have a story to tell, but that our stories help us to better understand who we were, who we are and who we are becoming. She has now designed nine memoir-based writing courses that invite participants to think of themselves as the narrators of their life as seen and written through a particular lens. Regardless of who she is working with, Anna is committed to supporting those she leads, by providing them with opportunities to set and meet their goals. In her spare time Anna writes short fiction and has been the recipient of numerous awards.

Register here, on or after November 19th, 2019

Writing Workshop 2
The Personal Journal: A Springboard for Memoir – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

There are writers who write because we need to make sense of the world we live in; writing is a way to clarify, to interpret, to reinvent. (bell hooks)

Whether we call ourselves writers or not, writing gives clarity to our lived experiences. This is a workshop for those who are interested in pausing, looking back and honouring their lives through focused journal writing. While the goal of this writing workshop is to gather memories and stories, participants can expect to learn about writing as a craft and how it is we go from writing for ourselves to writing for others.

  • Days: Tuesdays, January 14 – February 18
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 270, Residence Commons Building (main campus)
  • Picture of prepaid parking icon and pay-as-you-go parking iconFee: $200.00 (HST included)
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Writing workshop outline

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Anna RuminLecturer biography: Dr. Anna Rumin is a native Montrealer whose identity has been shaped by the political landscape of her home province, her Russian roots, a passion for life-long learning that has been woven both formally in academia and informally through travel, voracious reading and writing, and a love for the stories hidden in our natural world. Her interest in narrative inquiry stems from her belief that not only do we all have a story to tell, but that our stories help us to better understand who we were, who we are and who we are becoming. She has now designed nine memoir-based writing courses that invite participants to think of themselves as the narrators of their life as seen and written through a particular lens. Regardless of who she is working with, Anna is committed to supporting those she leads, by providing them with opportunities to set and meet their goals. In her spare time Anna writes short fiction and has been the recipient of numerous awards.

Register here, on or after November 19th, 2019

Writing Workshop 3
Writing the Stories of My Life: Remembering My Father – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

We all have a story to tell. In these workshops you are invited to re-collect, record and share the stories from your life through memories of your father. What are the stories we want to remember, share and honour? We will work at isolating the small, rare and authentic stories that most effectively show who he was/is. How might writing about our fathers give us a glimpse into who we are, who we were and who we have become? Please bring your writing instruments as well as photographs and “artifacts” that you associate with your father.

  • Days: Thursdays, January 16 – February 20
  • Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 14, Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre (355 Cooper Street)
  • Fee: $200.00 (HST included)Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is available
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Writing workshop outline – Coming soon!

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Anna RuminLecturer biography: Dr. Anna Rumin is a native Montrealer whose identity has been shaped by the political landscape of her home province, her Russian roots, a passion for life-long learning that has been woven both formally in academia and informally through travel, voracious reading and writing, and a love for the stories hidden in our natural world. Her interest in narrative inquiry stems from her belief that not only do we all have a story to tell, but that our stories help us to better understand who we were, who we are and who we are becoming. She has now designed nine memoir-based writing courses that invite participants to think of themselves as the narrators of their life as seen and written through a particular lens. Regardless of who she is working with, Anna is committed to supporting those she leads, by providing them with opportunities to set and meet their goals. In her spare time Anna writes short fiction and has been the recipient of numerous awards.

Register here, on or after November 19th, 2019

Writing Workshop 4
Stories From Our Lives: An Introduction to Memoir Writing – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Anna Rumin

We write to taste life twice: once in the moment and once in retrospection. (Anaïs Nin)

We all have a story to tell. However, knowing where to begin can become so overwhelming that we put off writing the story at all. This is an invitation to re-collect, record and share the stories from your life. Please bring your own writing instruments to a safe environment where you will experiment with writing strategies using prompts, share your writing with others, and begin your collection of life-stories. Participants will be encouraged to use photographs and objects as prompts.

  • Days: Thursdays, January 16 – February 20
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. (2.5 hours)
  • Location: Room 14, Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre (355 Cooper Street)
  • Fee: $200.00 (HST included)Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is available
  • Enrollment capacity: 12 participants
  • Writing workshop outline – Coming soon!

Picture of LinR lecturer Dr. Anna RuminLecturer biography: Dr. Anna Rumin is a native Montrealer whose identity has been shaped by the political landscape of her home province, her Russian roots, a passion for life-long learning that has been woven both formally in academia and informally through travel, voracious reading and writing, and a love for the stories hidden in our natural world. Her interest in narrative inquiry stems from her belief that not only do we all have a story to tell, but that our stories help us to better understand who we were, who we are and who we are becoming. She has now designed nine memoir-based writing courses that invite participants to think of themselves as the narrators of their life as seen and written through a particular lens. Regardless of who she is working with, Anna is committed to supporting those she leads, by providing them with opportunities to set and meet their goals. In her spare time Anna writes short fiction and has been the recipient of numerous awards.

Register here, on or after November 19th, 2019

Language Workshops

Language Workshop 1
Italian for Travellers Level I, Part ICANCELLED
Lecturer: Carla Bonora

This workshop will provide participants with the skills to feel comfortable while communicating during a trip to Italy or in an Italian environment. This workshop will teach you how to introduce yourself, make hotel reservations, ask for directions, make a phone call, write an email, order in a restaurant, and face emergency situations. One field trip will familiarise participants with Italian food products in an Italian shop. Audiovisual materials about Italian culture, music, and daily life will also be a part of the workshop. Vi aspettiamo!

Language Workshop 2
Italian for Travellers Level I, Part II – CANCELLED
Lecturer: Carla Bonora

Continuing where Italian for Travellers Level I, Part I finished, we will cover additional basic interactions, enabling participants to feel comfortable while communicating during a trip to Italy or in an Italian environment. We will cover how to introduce ourselves and ask basic questions about others, as well as to speak about hobbies, dates and time, daily life and family members. One field trip will familiarize participants with Italian food products in an Italian shop (different from the Level I, Part I field trip). Audiovisual materials about Italian culture and music, as well as holidays and how to celebrate them will also be explored.

Language Workshop 3
Spanish for Travellers Level III
Lecturer: Dr. Ioana Dimitriu

This workshop is intended as a refresher for participants who have already acquired basic knowledge of Spanish. The main conversation topic is travelling. Participants will be introduced to the forms of the past and the imperfect tenses, which they will use to talk about their travel experiences. A variety of short texts and audiovisual materials will be used to familiarise students to the diverse socio-economic and cultural realities of the Spanish-speaking world.

  • Days: Wednesdays & Fridays, January 15 – February 12
  • Time: 9:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
  • Location: Room 14, Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre (355 Cooper Street)
  • Fee: $250.00 (HST included)
    • (Fee includes printed materials)Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is available
  • Enrollment capacity: 14 participants
  • Language workshop outline – Coming soon!

Picture of LinR lectuer Dr. Ioana DimitiruLecturer biography: Ioana Dimitriu has been developing and teaching Spanish for Travellers workshops at Levels I, II and III, in the Learning in Retirement Program since 2017. Ioana worked as an Assistant to the Ambassador of Argentina to Canada, and as a Spanish Sessional Lecturer at the University of Ottawa (2001-2008). She has recently been appointed a full-time Spanish Instructor at the School of Linguistics and Language Studies at Carleton University, where she has been working since 2010. Ioana holds a PhD in Spanish (Comparative Literature) and an MA in Spanish (Applied Linguistics) from the University of Ottawa (2010; 2002). Her current research interests are in the area of testimonial writings, with a focus on memoirs of former political prisoners of totalitarian regimes in Latin-America and in Eastern Europe. In this context, Ioana is examining the role of the humanities and the arts in one’s upbringing, and specifically at how a significant background in languages, literatures, film, history, theology, and visual arts, nourishes and supports the human person in times of crisis. Ioana’s personal interests include exploring other cultures through literature, film and travel, and kayaking on Loon Lake in South-Eastern Ontario.

Register here, on or after November 19th, 2019

Language Workshop 4
Elementary Spanish for Travellers Level I – FULL, WAITLIST OPEN
Lecturer: Dr. Ioana Dimitriu

This introductory Spanish workshop aims to provide participants with the grammatical and lexical elements that are essential for basic communication. Conversation topics will focus on travel and will include asking for directions, talking about the weather and the schedule, expressing food and accommodation preferences, describing places and tourist attractions, shopping for souvenirs, expressing medical concerns, and making an emergency call. Audiovisual materials will include cultural components related to different parts of the Spanish-speaking world. The workshop is practical for people who wish to be able to communicate in Spanish while travelling; it is also enjoyable for all armchair travelers.

  • Days: Wednesdays & Fridays, January 15 – February 12
  • Time: 11:45 a.m. – 1:45 p.m.
  • Location: Room 14, Carleton Dominion-Chalmers Centre (355 Cooper Street)
  • Fee: $250.00 (HST included)
    • (Fee includes printed materials)Image of parking meter, to identify that pay-as-you-go parking is available
  • Enrollment capacity: 14 participants
  • Language workshop outline – Coming soon!

Picture of LinR lectuer Dr. Ioana DimitiruLecturer biography: Ioana Dimitriu has been developing and teaching Spanish for Travellers workshops at Levels I, II and III, in the Learning in Retirement Program since 2017. Ioana worked as an Assistant to the Ambassador of Argentina to Canada, and as a Spanish Sessional Lecturer at the University of Ottawa (2001-2008). She has recently been appointed a full-time Spanish Instructor at the School of Linguistics and Language Studies at Carleton University, where she has been working since 2010. Ioana holds a PhD in Spanish (Comparative Literature) and an MA in Spanish (Applied Linguistics) from the University of Ottawa (2010; 2002). Her current research interests are in the area of testimonial writings, with a focus on memoirs of former political prisoners of totalitarian regimes in Latin-America and in Eastern Europe. In this context, Ioana is examining the role of the humanities and the arts in one’s upbringing, and specifically at how a significant background in languages, literatures, film, history, theology, and visual arts, nourishes and supports the human person in times of crisis. Ioana’s personal interests include exploring other cultures through literature, film and travel, and kayaking on Loon Lake in South-Eastern Ontario.

Register here, on or after November 19th, 2019