Interview from FPA Voices June 2018:

You’re a highly successful opera singer who has performed at the Royal Palace of Versailles, at Carnegie Hall and throughout Europe and Canada. Why did you decide to get a Master’s degree?

I was curious about the fact that classical music is primarily nonprofit in North America and wondered about how that fit into the broader tapestry of the non-profit sector as a whole. I think it’s important for artists like me to do research in our fields.

What was your favourite part of the program?

I came in as a blank slate and I learned so much. I had minimal experience in the broader nonprofit sector and appreciated expertise of such a diverse Faculty. I learnt a lot about program evaluation and was especially interested in nonprofit leadership in light of the unique leadership structures in classical music.

What really surprised me was the complete revival of my love for writing and academic research.

How did you balance your studies with your career?

For someone who is traveling all over the world, I can’t describe what an asset the program’s flexibility was. We had two summer sessions on campus, but the rest of the work was on line.

I was in Europe all last year, but I worked with Professor Paloma Raggo to develop an intensive literature review of the classical music sector for my research project. She was phenomenal.

What’s next on your agenda?

I’m hoping to pursue a PhD to further explore the research I began in the MPNL program. As for my opera career, I will be heading on tour to Chicago and France next season, and making an exciting role debut in Toronto.

Please read more convocation stories here from FPA Voices June 2018