2018 Awards

TEACHING ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS

 The Teaching Achievement Awards for faculty and instructor employees are administered by the Office of the Provost and Vice-President (Academic). The purpose of these awards is to recognize and enhance excellence in teaching for faculty and instructor employees and to provide financial support for the development of an innovative teaching project at Carleton University.  The Committee selected the following winners for the 2018 Teaching Achievement Awards:

Scott Bucking
Assistant Professor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering / Azrieli School of Architecture and Design
Faculty of Engineering and Design

Project: Experiential Learning using Design-Build Tiny Homes

Scott Bucking teaches sustainable building practices to undergraduate engineers and architects and leads a research program on net-zero energy communities. Recently, he embarked on a design-build of a net-zero energy tiny home called the Northern Nomad. The project hired 10 undergraduate students from several disciplines of architecture and engineering. Scott is a firm believer of ‘hands-on’ experience with the goal of enabling passionate students to see the path towards carbon-free building infrastructure.

James R. Green
Associate Professor
Department of Systems and Computer Engineering
Faculty of Engineering and Design

Project: Engineers in the Hospital – Experiential Learning in Capstone Projects

 This award will establish a suite of capstone design projects for undergraduate engineering students with the overarching theme of the design and implementation of novel biomedical devices and technologies. All projects will be completed in close collaboration with local research hospitals. Leveraging the department’s recent investment in a Maker Space, this award will be used to purchase a range of sensors, processors, and robotic equipment to enable these projects. Together with the development of training materials, these resources will permit students to construct iterative prototypes to deploy and evaluate solutions in the clinical environment.

 D. Gregory MacIsaac
Associate Professor
The College of the Humanities
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

Project: HUMS 1200 “Humanities and Classical Civilization” A Model for First-Year Writing for Carleton and Beyond

My project is HUMS 1200 — Humanities and Classical Civilization — that I developed as a required writing course in the Bachelor of Humanities program. It teaches students how to read texts for arguments and how to construct their own arguments, through a sequence of scaffolding assignments and in-class exercises. HUMS 1200 uses Greek and Roman epic as its subject matter, but my long-term goal is to help other programs develop their own versions of the course on their own material.

Leighann Neilson
Associate Professor
Sprott School of Business

Project: Using Video to Represent Research: a Consumer Culture Theory Approach

While many students are avid consumers of social media in general and of YouTube in particular, very few of them have created video. Video has become extremely important to the practice of marketing; it is also important for representing research results. To help prepare our students for the marketplace and/or further graduate education, students in our Consumer Culture Theory course research a consumer behavior topic and present their results in both a traditional term paper format and as a research video. They also create a short ‘trailer,’ to ‘tease’ the audience prior to showing their video in the classroom. Funds from this Teaching Achievement Award will facilitate the purchase of new video equipment to support student research.

Marc Saurette
Associate Professor
Department of History
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

Project: Using Medieval Manuscripts in Teaching Archival Digitization

This project has two goals: firstly, to develop a hands-on seminar teaching undergraduate and graduate students the practical skills and issues of digitizing archival material and, secondly, to establish a pilot project (proof of concept) for an on-going digitization effort here at Carleton. By engaging in a real-life digitization project of our two medieval manuscripts, this class will teach students the standard practices for setting up an online archive, populating it with content, and ensuring its accessibility. In future years, non-medieval material would form the basis of the class, allowing more unique texts from the ARC collection to be made accessible to scholars and the community.

PROFESSIONAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS

The Professional Achievement Awards for librarians and instructor employees are administered by the Office of the Provost and Vice-President (Academic). The purpose of these awards is to recognize outstanding professional achievements at Carleton University for professional librarians and instructor employees. The Committee selected the following winners for the 2018 Professional Achievement Awards.

Shannon Butler
Instructor III
Sprott School of Business

I teach accounting; however, my interests are more than accounting.  I have a heart of compassion and care for all people, therefore I am fully dedicated to creating an environment for my students that will encourage them to not only learn the technical aspects of accounting, but also to grow as a person, to be encouraged and cared for.  I love incorporating new technology into my teaching and trying new things.  The newest project that I have been working on is creating videos using Carleton’s new light board.  This is an exciting way to create engaging videos, which will contribute to providing students with the best opportunities for success.

Shawna Dolansky
Instructor II
The College of the Humanities
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

Teaching the study of religion can be fraught with built-in tensions.  Focusing on ancient religions by reading their texts and analyzing their material culture provides a more neutral ground upon which students can learn to understand and appreciate worldviews that differ from theirs, and to think critically about how and why both ancient texts, and modern knowledge about them, are constructed.   Shawna Dolansky strives to craft engaging courses that challenge students to think about history, religion, and literature in a way that highlights the vast differences between our world and the ancient one, while simultaneously touching on the human elements that speak intimately to us from the pages of ancient texts across language, space, and time.  In addition to learning about the origins of modern religions, students finish her courses equipped with the tools of historical, literary, and critical religion scholarship; an appreciation for evaluating primary sources within their own cultural and historical contexts; and an open mind to the worldviews, values, and ideas of other people, other places, and other times.  Most significantly, they are prepared to be knowledgeable, thoughtful, and engaged citizens in a multicultural world.

Richard Nimijean
Instructor III
School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

Richard Nimijean consistently seeks new methods, increasingly in online courses, to help students understand and explain Canada. Most recently, he developed CDNS 1001, Studying Canada, and featuring extensive collaboration with his colleagues in the School and the library’s Canadian Studies Subject Specialist, Martha Attridge Bufton. His research focuses on the politics of branding Canada. He is co-editing (with Jeffrey Ayres) a special issue of the Canadian Foreign Policy Journal on the theme of “Is Canada Back? Brand Canada in a Turbulent World.” He has an extensive record of service to the university and the field of Canadian Studies and is currently co-editor of the International Journal of Canadian Studies.

Beth A. Robertson
Instructor I
Department of History
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

Beth A. Robertson is an Instructor in the Department of History. Her scholarly research explores the margins of science, technology and medicine, and most recently the historical intersections between technology and disability in transnational Cold War Canada. Her professional award will be dedicated to fostering collaboration between faculty, staff and students across the Humanities and STEM fields through the creation of a multidisciplinary group she hopes to establish called Technology and Engineering in Collaboration with Health, History and Social Sciences (TECHHSS). The primary focus of TECHHSS will be on creating more inclusive and accessible spaces of learning by thinking through systemic barriers to education and coming up with practical and engaging solutions to be implemented within the classroom.

PROFESSIONAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS
(LIBRARY)

Jane Fry
Data Services Librarian (Research Support Services)
MacOdrum Library

As Data Services Librarian, Jane Fry is passionate in educating researchers working with data. She is tireless in improving access to data through library services and technical infrastructure.  She is active in the data community here at Carleton, nationally and internationally. As well, she has published, conducted research, and presented and taught on different aspects of data.  Her other professional contributions to the greater library and research community include: data services training, including research data management and DDI; strategic planning; professional mentoring; consultations; and conference planning.

CONTRACT INSTRUCTOR TEACHING AWARDS

The Contract Instructor Teaching Awards are administered by the Office of the Provost and Vice-President (Academic).  The purpose of these awards is to recognize teaching excellence by Contract Instructors.  The committee selected the following winners for the 2018 Contract Instructor Teaching Awards.

Laura Ierfino-Blachford
Contract Instructor
Sprott School of Business

Laura Ierfino-Blachford teaches Strategic Management at both the undergraduate and graduate level in the Sprott School of Business. Laura innovated the MBA strategy course to include project based learning whereby students provide consulting services for client firms. Laura liaised with over 30 firms to recruit clients for the projects in the past year. Laura’s strategic management consulting experience and PhD in Management from McGill University, gives her the knowledge and flexibility required to guide students working with different firms in various industries.

Julie McCarroll
Contract Instructor
School of Linguistics and Language Studies
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

Julie McCarroll is an instructor of English for Academic Purposes (ESLA) in the School of Linguistics and Language Studies. Since 2013, she has taught introductory, intermediate, and advanced level ESLA courses. Her primary goal is to give international students the tools and skills they need for success in their future studies at Carleton. To achieve this, she motivates and engages students by using technology, including ePortfolio and blended classes, and a variety of instructional approaches, such as experiential learning.

Alexandra Pettit
Contract Instructor
Department of Neuroscience
Faculty of Science

Alexandra Pettit is the teaching lab coordinator and a contract instructor with the Department of Neuroscience. Since 2015, she has taught courses introducing students to the human brain with a focus on mental health and disease. A passionate teacher, Alex is committed to making complex material accessible and relatable to all students, while empowering them to become self-motivated, independent learners. She accomplishes this by cultivating a positive and interactive classroom, modeling learning for her students, and incorporating experiential learning activities into the traditional lecture setting.

CONTRACT INSTRUCTOR TEACHING INNOVATION GRANT

The purpose of the CITI grant is to provide support to a Contract Instructor for investigating student learning and alternative approaches to teaching and assessing student learning at the individual, departmental, Faculty, or institutional levels. The overall aims are to foster deep student learning at Carleton University and promote curiosity, reflection, and exploration in the areas of teaching and learning.

Julie McCarroll
Contract Instructor
School of Linguistics and Language Studies
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

Comparing student outcomes of a research assignment where participants used either ePortfolio or a paper-based portfolio, this research will investigate the impact that ePortfolio, as a pedagogical practice, has on the development of communication skills, considered to be one of the 21st century learning skills.