When it comes to accessible text remember: keep it structured and simple.

Use Headings to provide page structure

Your headings must be nested.  When a screen reader navigates through that content, it reads the titles sequentially – Heading 1 (H1), then Heading 2 (H2), then Heading 3 (H3) and the user can skip past headings.

When not structured properly the screen reader skips through the content in a way that would be very confusing to the user.

Not Accessible:

text on a page that is not accessible, description of why below image

There are no headings (H1, H2, H3, etc) to define page structure, bold has been used in its place. This impacts not only accessibility, but search engine results. The page is also not easily scanned.

Accessible:

text on a page showing accessible web content, description of why it is accessible below image
Using proper heading formats (H1, H2, H3) allows for assistive technologies to navigate the page.  The content was reorganized with a logical structure of headings and subheadings.  It is also easier to scan.

Write succinct sentences and paragraphs

Break up long paragraphs – no more than 50 words per paragraphs. Write short sentences – between 20 and 40 words (avoid filler words, keep language simple).

Not Accessible

text on a page showing content that is not accessible, description of why it's not accessible located below the image

This large block of text is hard to read and is easy to skim past without reading.

Accessible

text on a page showing content that is accessible, description of why it's accessible located below the image

The content was reduced to only the most critical information. Paragraphs were broken up and unnecessary words were removed.

Limit the use of all caps and underlines

All caps are difficult to read on a screen and someone may misinterpret an underline for a hyperlink.