Grants Received

The Great Lakes Research Alliance for the Study of Aboriginal Arts & Cultures has been generously supported since 2005 by a number of research and infrastructure grants, many of which are detailed below.

We have also benefitted immensely from the donation of in-kind support (for things such as office and lab space, infrastructure and student positions) from our main partner institutions – including Carleton University, the Woodland Cultural Centre, the Ojibwe Cultural Foundation, the University of Toronto, and Cornell University. Our GRASAC Knowledge Sharing System (the GKS database) was supported with in-kind donations from Ideeclic software developers. And, crucially, each GRASAC research team visit to a museum or cultural repository has been made possible by the generous donation of staff time and expertise from those institutions.

Primary GRASAC Grants:

“Growing GRASAC” Partnership Development Grant (2016-2018) Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada ($192,454) Grant leader: Heidi Bohaker. Team members: Laurie Bertram, John Borrows, Dusti Bridges, Shenella Charles, Cathleen Clark, Alan Corbiere, Mary Ann Corbiere, Wahsontiio Cross, Adriana Greci Green, Anna Hoefnaegels, Anne de Stecher, Carrie Dyck, Julia Gil, Kate Higginson, Kahente Horn-Miller, Michael Galban, Darlene Johnston, Nadia Kaakati, Kurt Jordan, Cara Krmpotich, Mitchell Mittelstaedt, Janis Monture, Alex Nahwegahbow, David Penney, Ruth Phillips, Sarah Proulx, Naomi Recollet, Jolene Rickard, Zachary Smith, Katrina Srigley, Orivs Starkweather, John Steckley, Lisa Truong, Rand Valentine, Paula Whitlow. Primary Partners: Carleton University, Cornell University, University of Toronto, Woodland Cultural Centre. {Supported the GRASAC meeting at Cornell and the GRASAC Gathering at the Woodland Cultural Centre in 2016; supports approximately 10 current research projects (see the Research in Action section for more details on these) and ongoing research into GRASAC’s governance structure, expansion plans and long-term sustainability.}
Premier’s Discovery Award to Ruth Phillips (2010-2016) Ontario Ministry of Innovation ($250,000) Grant leader: Ruth Phillips. Research team: many GRASAC members and research assistants! {Supported the 2010 Indigenous languages design meeting and the 2014 GRASAC research conference; numerous research trips (including those to Paris, Geneva, the ROM, Amsterdam, Denver, and the Canadian Museum of History); research assistant positions at Catrleton, the University of Toronto and Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; the GRASAC research coordinator position; IT support; and software improvements.}
GRASAC Lab Operation and Maintenance (2013-2017) Carleton University & the Canada Foundation for Innovation ($12,000) Grant leader: Ruth Phillips. Team members: Kate Higginson & Chris Yagi. {Funded IT support for GRASAC’s server and lab; hardware upgrades and repairs; air conditioning and security.}
Renewal Funding for Dr Phillips’ Canada Research Chair (2010-2013) Canada Foundation for Innovation and Carleton University ($188,000) Grant leader: Ruth Phillips. Team members: Heidi Bohaker, Kate Higginson, Lisa Truong, Rand Valentine & Cory Willmott. {Purchase of new server, network hardware, lab hardware and software, research kits, upgrades to collaborative room; software development for the GKS4 and Drupal conversion; development of GRASAC’s first public website; and research assistantships at Carleton and the University of British Columbia.}
“Braiding Knowledges: Anishinaabe Heritage in Community Perspective” (2007-2010) SSHRC Aboriginal Research Grant ($226,000) Grant leader: Ruth Phillips. Research team: the Ojibwe Cultural Foundation, Heidi Bohaker, John Borrows, Alan Corbiere, Anne de Stecher, Darlene Johnston, Kate Higginson, Heather Igloriorte, Stacey Loyer, Crystal Migwans, David Penney, Sherry Farrell Racette, Cory Willmott.  {Supported team research trips (including to Detroit, the Jesuit Archives, Dublin, Manitoulin, Cambridge & Philadelphia); research assistantships at Carleton, the University of Toronto, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, and the University of Victoria; and the GRASAC 2011 research conference at M’Chigeeng.}
Creation of the Visual Studies Lab, Carleton University (2005) Canada Foundation for Innovation and Carleton University ($719,000) Grant leader: Ruth Phillips. Team members: Heidi Bohaker, Ian Bell. {Supported the creation of the ICSLAC space including GRASAC offices and lab; the purchase of hardware, software, equipment for server, network, lab, collaborative classroom, and research field kits; and GRASAC IT support position.}
Aboriginal Heritage at Home & Abroad: An International Collaboration for Research on Great Lakes Cultures & Collections (2006) SSHRC International Opportunities Fund ($74,900) Grant leader: Ruth Phillips. Team members: Hedi Bohaker, John Borrows, Alan Corbiere, Keith Jamieson, Darlene Johnston, Jonathan King, Henrietta Lidchi, Laura Peers. Partners: the British Museum, the National Museums of Scotland, the Ojibwe Cultural Foundation, the Pitt-Rivers Museum, Woodland Cultural Centre. {Funded the second large GRASAC meeting; and GRASAC team research trips to Scotland and England}.
Image Text Sound Technology Networking Grant (2004) Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada ($50,000) Team leader: Ruth Phillips. Team members: Heidi Bohaker, Alan Corbiere, Christian Feest, Adriana Greci Green, Allan Greer, Darlene Johnston, Judy Hall, Sylvia Kasprycki, John Medicine Horse Kelly, Jonathan King, Moira McCaffrey, Bruce Morito, Trudy Nicks, Doron Nussbaum, Cath Oberholtzer, Mark Olsen, Laura Peers, David Penney, Carolyn Podrucny, Jolene Rickard, Michele Hayter Smith, Germaine Warkentin, Cory Willmott. Partners: Kanien’kehaka Onkwawen:na Raotitiohkwa, Akwesasne Cultural Center and Museum, Kinoomaadoog Cultural and Historical Research, Mnjikaning First Nation. {Supported the first large GRASAC meeting and the development of GRASAC’s initial project software with data contributed by the Canadian Museum of Civilization and the National Museum of the American Indian.}