darlene-gilson-pictureDarlene Gilson: Research Facilitator for the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences/Development and Training Manager, Office of the Vice-President (Research and International), former Director of Research Services, member of the Society of Research Administrators International, member of the Research Ethics Standing Committee for the Mining Industry Human Resources Council, and member of the Manuscript Editorial Committee for the Journal of Healthcare, Science and the Humanities. Ms. Gilson provides administrative and proposal writing support and is a member of the leadership team for the creation of the Carleton University Institute on the Ethics of Research with Indigenous Peoples.

k-g-pictureKatherine Graham: Professor of Public Policy and Administration (Carleton University), Senior Advisor to the Provost, a Fellow of the Carleton Centre for Community Innovation, the current Chair of Community-based Research Canada and member of SSHRC’s Aboriginal Advisory Council. Professor Graham is leading the Carleton University Institute on the Ethics of Research with Indigenous Peoples initiative. She has a deep commitment to Aboriginal policy issues and the sustainability of Aboriginal communities. Her research interests concern urban and local governance, Aboriginal and northern development policy, and institutional reform in government.

sheila-grantham-160x235-e1447255894802-160x160Sheila Grantham: Sheila is a part-time Ph.D. student in Canadian Studies at Carleton and works fulltime with the Métis Nation of Ontario as the Post-Secondary Education Officer. She has over 15 years’ experience working with community, provincial and national aboriginal organizations, and have worked within various Métis and First Nations community-based research projects. Furthermore, she assisted in the creation of the Principles of Ethical Métis Research and collaborated with several academics to write a chapter on “Researching with Respect: The Contributions of Feminist, Aboriginal and Community-Based Research Approaches to the development of our Study of First Nations Women’s Healing from Problematic Drug Use”; which was recently published in December of 2014.

laura-pciLaura Gagnon: Laura is a fourth year student studying Communications and Media Studies with a minor in Indigenous studies at Carleton. She has worked for three years as an Aboriginal High School Mentor and has experience working as an Undergraduate Recruitment Officer. Her passion of reconciling relationships between Indigenous peoples and corporate institutions has led her to pursue higher education. She also hopes to inspire and motivate younger generations by using her voice to sing traditional drum songs. Laura’s plans are to continue her education with a Masters in Indigenous Governance with the hopes of establishing knowledge and networks that further her commitment to relationship building for the benefit of Indigenous communities.

j-kelly-picJohn Medicine Horse Kelly: Professor of Journalism, Co-Director of the Centre for Indigenous Research, Culture, Language and Education (Carleton University) and the co-host of the Panel on Research Ethics’ webinar “Research Involving First Nations, Inuit and Metis Peoples of Canada (May 10, 2012)”. Dr. Kelly is also a contributor to the soon-to-be-released Panel on Research Ethics’ tutorial for Chapter 9. He is a member of the curriculum development sub-committee for the Carleton University Institute on the Ethics of Research with Indigenous Peoples and is a member of the leadership team for the creation of the Carleton University Institute on the Ethics of Research with Indigenous Peoples.

Anticipating Problems, Finding SolutionsGita Ljubicic: Associate Professor in Geography and Environmental Studies. Dr. Ljubicic has been working collaboratively with Inuit communities across Nunavut since 2001, learning from their expertise on various topics related to arctic marine and terrestrial environments. This involves ethical considerations in all stages of the research process, and thus she was keen to contribute as a member of the leadership team for the creation of the Carleton University Institute on the Ethics of Research with Indigenous Peoples.

SebSebastien Malette: Sebastien Malette is of mixed-heritage Métis/Québécois (Michigamea/Kaskaskia Historic Community). Sebastien is interested in problematizing the relationships between Law and Indigeneity as both enabling and disrupting relations of domination affecting countries and communities with a colonial history. His research centers on Indigenous Law, Metis/Mixed-Heritage Studies, governmentality, environmentalism and decolonization. Happily married, Sebastien is the proud father of two wonderful children.

rodney-nelsonRodney Nelson: Professor in the Centre for Initiatives in Education, Aboriginal Enriched Support Program, co-Chair of Carleton University’s Aboriginal Education Council, CEO and Principal of Governance for The Global Governance Group, member of the CanPrep Joint Centre for BioEthics, University of Toronto (2008-09). Mr. Nelson is a member of the leadership team for the creation of the Carleton University Institute on the Ethics of Research with Indigenous Peoples and is a member of the curriculum development sub-committee for the Carleton University Institute on the Ethics of Research with Indigenous Peoples.

Pitseolak Pfeifer: Mr. Pfeifer is a full time undergraduate student who returned to post-secondary education following a career in management and as a policy advisor on social and cultural issues in Nunavut. He is the Academic Program co-ordinator for the Aboriginal Service Centre, providing all students access to a space dedicated to upholding traditional values and contemporary shifts amongst aboriginal students. The centre works alongside the community on campus and within Ottawa. Mr. Pfeifer is a member of the leadership team for the creation of the Carleton University Institute on the Ethics of Research with Indigenous Peoples.

allan ryanAllan Ryan: New Sun Chair in Aboriginal Art and Culture, Professor of Art History and Canadian Studies. Dr. Ryan has a special interest in contemporary Aboriginal issues and their aesthetic manifestation in literature, film and the visual arts. He is also interested in postmodern theory, postcolonial theory, comparative indigenous minorities, cultural representation in museums, and the field of humour studies. Dr. Ryan is a strong proponent of indigenous pedagogy in post-secondary curricula, emphasizing the oral tradition and holistic learning, and trying to make the experience personal and transformational. Dr. Ryan also organizes the annual New Sun Conference on Aboriginal Arts, which will celebrate its 14th Anniversary in February 2015. Dr. Ryan is a member of the leadership team for the creation of the Carleton University Institute on the Ethics of Research with Indigenous Peoples.

hugh_shewellHugh Shewell: Professor of Social Work and past Director of the School of Social Work. Dr. Shewell has a passion for social change. His research interests focus on Aboriginal-State relations in Canada, Aboriginal social welfare, social policy and social rights, and poverty and ideology. Dr. Shewell is the author of “Enough to Keep Them Alive: Indian Welfare in Canada 1873-1965”. He is a member of the curriculum development sub-committee for the Carleton University Institute on the Ethics of Research with Indigenous Peoples and is a member of the leadership team for the creation of the Carleton University Institute on the Ethics of Research with Indigenous Peoples.

headshot1Derek Antoine: is a PhD Candidate and Instructor in the School of Journalism and Communication. His research interests focus on Indigenous social movements, decolonization, identities, and political communication. His current research focuses on discourses of violence surrounding Indigenous resistance and their relationship to projects of decolonization. Before returning to academics, Derek worked as a political staffer on Parliament Hill, a communications advisor at one of Ottawa’s largest youth social service agencies, and a fundraiser.