Feb 8, 2022: Thank you to everyone who submitted! Our CFP for Underhill 2022 is now closed; check back soon for conference registration and schedule.

Join us (virtually) on March 18, 2022 for the Underhill Graduate Student Colloquium, presented by Carleton’s Department of History. Our theme, (Re)thinking History is meant to forefront work going beyond the traditional bounds of academia including the sources being studied, the way we work, how we approach archives, how we share our work, the themes we consider, and the communities involved. Academic history needs to adapt to the times, and we would like this conference to do so as well. To that end, this year’s colloquium will feature graduate work as well as two keynote presentations that discuss history in the public sphere, in the archives, in classrooms, and in academic institutions – all with an understanding that capital ‘H’ history needs to change in order to reflect our communities, our students, and to put into practice long overdue action items from the TRC report. 

With this focus on METHOD as PRACTICE, we are looking for MA and PhD submissions from all disciplines that consider the following: 

  1. considerations in our practice (i.e., efforts to decolonize the sources we use, the bibliographies we create, and the ways we engage with and approach archives and archival practice) 
  2. non-mainstream and/or non-textually based sources (i.e., oral histories, local newspapers and magazines, museum exhibits, zines, public art, podcasts, music, film, comic books, Instagram posts, and/or other material and popular culture)
  3. methods of engaging our publics and disseminating research (i.e., open access; multimedia including podcasts, film, and digital exhibits; cross-disciplinary partnerships) 

Are you working with sources in a creative way, trying a new method, or presenting your research in a different way? Or, are you engaging with traditional academic sources in a way that shares new information, re-examines interpretations, or that serves a different public? Do you have a workshop idea that considers different platforms for engagement?  

If any of those apply to you, then we’d love to hear about your research! While we welcome all submissions, we would especially invite those that (re)think history in pragmatic and pedagogical ways that move theoretical discussions into meaningful practice. 

Also, to meet our theme of (Re)thinking History, we also want to rethink how we conference! 

To that end we are looking for submissions of the following 4 types of short talks: 

  • Traditional — on Current or Recent Research (individual talks ~7-10 mins/each) 
  • Workshops — on particular methodologies (individual short presentations ~7-10 mins/each)
  • Course Project Panel — on a project from a course (group presentations) 
  • Help me find others for a panel! Have an idea for a great Roundtable discussion or Project Panel but looking for fellow panelists? Let us help you! 

The Underhill Colloquium is meant to spotlight graduate research and ideas – especially from Carleton’s History and other departments. If you have an idea but aren’t sure where to start, please contact us! 

Ready? Submit your ideas, panel proposals, and paper abstracts via Google Form by Feb 4, 2022.
*Feb 8, 2022: CFP now closed; check back soon for Registration & Schedule Information. 

Questions? Contact us! Looking forward to your submissions, and wishing everyone a safe and restful winter break. 

___________________________________________________________________

Underhill 2022 Planning Committee 

Amie Wright (she/her)
Co-Chair, Underhill Colloquium
1st Year PhD, Concentration in Public History 

Jaime Simons (they/them)
Co-Chair, Underhill Colloquium
2nd Year MA, Public History and Digital Humanities

Meranda Gallupe-Paton (she/her)
Communications Officer, Underhill Colloquium
2nd Year MA, Public History and Digital Humanities

Please follow us online as we release more details in the weeks to come re: our Keynote Speakers and full conference schedule:

The Underhill Graduate Student Colloquium is made possible by the generous contribution of the Frank H. Underhill donation.