Photo of Morgan Rooney

Morgan Rooney

Degrees:B.A. Honours (Carleton University), M.A. (Carleton University), Ph.D. (University of Ottawa)
Phone:613-520-2600 x 8560
Email:morgan.rooney@carleton.ca
Office:410B DT

Research Interests:

My primary field of interest is British Literature in the “long” eighteenth century (1660–1832). I have written extensively on the novelists of the 1790s and the Romantic period, and on the French Revolution debate. My current research examines the novel and poetry canons emerging in the wake of the watershed 1774 copyright ruling.

Publications:

Books

The French Revolution Debate and the British Novel, 1790-1814: The Struggle for History’s Authority. Transits: Literature, Thought and Culture 1650-1850. Lewisburg, PA: Bucknell University Press, 2012.

Articles in Refereed Journals and Books

“Charlotte Smith and the Persistence of the Past.”  Didactic Novels and British Women’s Writing, 1790-1820. Ed. Hilary Havens.  London: Routledge, 2017:  21-37.

“Anti-Jacobin Fiction and the Eighteenth-Century Traditions of the Novel: Robert Bisset, Isaac D’Israeli, and the Novel’s Reclamation.” Eighteenth-Century Studies 48.2 (2015): 221-39.

“Reading History in a Revolutionary Age: Strategies for Interpreting 1688 in Richard Price, James Mackintosh, and Edmund Burke.” Lumen 27 (2009): 27-40.

“‘Belonging to No/Body’: Mary Robinson, The Natural Daughter, and Rewriting Feminine Identity.” Eighteenth-Century Fiction 18:3 (2006): 355-72.

Reviews and Other Publications

Seven entries for The Cambridge Guide to the Eighteenth-Century Novel, 1660-1820. Ed. April London. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, forthcoming.

Rev. of Fictional Matter: Empiricism, Corpuscles, and the Novel, by Helen Thompson. Journal of British Studies 57.1 (2018): forthcoming.

Rev. of British Historical Fiction before Scott, by Anne H. Stevens. Wordsworth Circle 43.4 (2012): 249-50.

Rev. of The Cottagers of Glenburnie: And Other Educational Writing, by Elizabeth Hamilton, ed. Pam Perkins. Scottish Literary Review 4.2 (2012): 193-95.

“William Duff.” Eighteenth-Century Literary Scholars and Critics. Ed. Frans De Bruyn. Dictionary of Literary Biography 356. Detroit: Gale, 2010. 69-77.

Papers Presented:

“The Impacts of Changing PhD Programs on Research and Practice in English” (panel).  Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English (ACCUTE) Conference. Regina, Saskatchewan. 26-29 May 2018.

“Measuring the Impact, Strengths, and Limitations of Formative Assessment: A Case Study.”  Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (STLHE) Conference. Halifax, Nova Scotia. 20-23 June 2017.

“Pedagogical Training and the Future of the PhD Program.”  STLHE Conference.  London, Ontario. 21-24 June 2016.

“Fostering a Culture of Teaching Professionalization:  Challenges, Opportunities, and Strategies.”  Modern Language Association (MLA) Convention.  Vancouver, British Columbia.  8-11 January 2015.

“Transforming Undergraduate Essay Writing:  Towards a Potential Model.”  Workshop.  STLHE Conference.  Kingston, Ontario.  17-20 June 2014.

“Women, Novel Reading, and the Novel Canon in the 1790s.” American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS) Conference. Williamsburg, Virginia. March 20– 22.

“Anti-Jacobin Fiction and the Eighteenth-Century Traditions of the Novel: Robert Bisset, Isaac D’Israeli, and the Novel’s Reclamation.” Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (CSECS) Conference. University of Alberta. 17–20 October 2012.

“The Struggle for History’s Authority: The Example of Maria Edgeworth’s Castle Rackrent (1800).” American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference. San Antonio, Texas. March 22-25, 2012.

“‘Auld ways are aye the best’: Custom and Tradition in Elizabeth Hamilton’s Cottagers of Glenburnie (1807) and Hannah More’s Cheap Repository Tracts (1795-98).” Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies / Aphra Behn Society / Northeast American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Conference. McMaster University. October 27-29, 2011.

“The Problem of History in the 1790s: The Persistence of the Past in Charlotte Smith’s Old Manor House and William Godwin’s St. Leon.” CSECS Conference. Memorial University. October 14-16, 2010.

“Representing History in a Post-Revolutionary Age: Jane Porter and Historical Fiction before Walter Scott.” CSECS / NASECS Conference. University of Ottawa. November 5-8, 2009.

“‘Tales of other times’: Reform, Reaction, and the Politics of Representing History in Maria Edgeworth’s Castle Rackrent.” CSECS Conference. McGill University. October 15-18, 2008.

“The Discourses of History in the Anti-Jacobin Novel: George Walker’s The Vagabond and Robert Bisset’s Douglas; or, The Highlander.” CSECS Conference. University of Manitoba. October 17-20, 2007.

“Reading History in a Revolutionary Age: Strategies for Interpreting 1688 in Richard Price, James Mackintosh, and Edmund Burke.” CSECS Conference. Dalhousie University. October 18-21, 2006.

“The Writing Self: Authorship, Identity, and the Body in Mary Robinson’s The Natural Daughter.” CSECS Conference. Université du Québec à Trois Rivières. October 19-22, 2005.