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Katherine A.H. Graham Lecture on Aboriginal Policy

Established in 2009, the Katherine A.H. Graham Lecture on Aboriginal Policy provides a vehicle for examining a wide range of policy issues, cases, models and tools related to First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities across Canada. Under this initiative, the University annually invites a noted leader in the Aboriginal community, the non-profit sector, government or business to present a public lecture on Aboriginal policy.

Katherine Graham served as Dean of the Faculty of Public Affairs from 2003-2009. This lectureship honours her deep commitment to the sustainability of Aboriginal communities through public policy and citizen engagement.

The Graham lectures provide a vehicle for examining a wide range of issues, cases, models and tools related to First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities across Canada.

The event takes place in June.

Last event: Aboriginal-Canada Relations: From RCAP to 2016

 

chartrand-nov15-emailPaul Chartrand, Indigenous Peoples’ Counsel (IPC) of Canada’s Indigenous Bar Association is a former Professor of Law. He is the author of numerous publications about the law and policy of states respecting indigenous peoples. He is currently writing a book that is critical of the judicial development of Metis rights, and practices law part-time. He was a member of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, Manitoba’s Aboriginal Justice Implementation Commission and Canada’s Aboriginal Healing Foundation.   

View the video here.

 

Previous Speakers


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Val Napoleon: Indigenous Legal Perspectives as Policy and Research Foundation

2015
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James K. Bartleman: Aboriginal Canadians: The Struggle to be Seen as Human

2013
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Satsan (Herb George): A New Era in Aboriginal/Crown Relations – A New Frontier for Educational Institutions

2012
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Shawn A-in-chut Atleo: Smashing the Status Quo

2011
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Mary May Simon: The Biggest Social Policy Change of Our Time

2010