Photo of Marika Morris

Marika Morris

Adjunct Research Professor

Degrees:B.A. Hons. (Carleton), M.A. (Carleton), Ph.D. (Carleton)
Email:Marika.Morris@Carleton.ca
Website:Browse
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Biography

I am a research, evaluation and training consultant (www.marika-morris-consulting.org). I work mainly on issues of equity, and my clients include Indigenous organizations, not-for-profit organizations, government departments, businesses, labour unions, and the United Nations.

My life and scholarship has taken interesting twists and turns, as I went back to complete a Ph.D. only after many years doing public policy and community-based research. I bring this applied experience into my scholarship. My academic studies have been interdisciplinary from the start, with elements of the social sciences, humanities, and sciences at the undergraduate level. My Honours B.A. is in Psychology and Linguistics, my M.A. and Ph.D. are in Canadian Studies. My Ph.D. fields were Policy, Economy, Society and Women’s Studies.
Prior to earning my Ph.D., I was Research Coordinator for the Canadian Research Institute for the Advancement of Women (CRIAW) for five years. CRIAW is a not-for-profit organization which bridges the gap between academic and community research through building partnerships and translating academic research into a form communities and individuals can use for positive social change. I was the coordinating researcher on two multi-site community-university research projects, which involved significant partnership building. For example, we partnered with the Downtown Eastside Women’s Centre in Vancouver, the Calgary Immigrant Women’s Association and the Centre for Disability Studies in Winnipeg, as well as academics doing research on women and poverty using an intersectional approach, to do research with women living on low incomes about how they experienced public policy at federal, provincial and municipal levels. This research culminated in the publication of Integrating the Voices of Low-income Women into Policy Discussions on the Canada Social Transfer: First Nations Women in Vancouver, Immigrant and Refugee Women in Calgary and Women with Disabilities in Winnipeg. At CRIAW, I also led workshops across Canada on how community organizations could do participatory action research to meet their needs. In consultation and collaboration, I also developed a series of factsheets on topics such as violence against women and girls, women and poverty, immigrant and refugee women, and how race and gender interact.

My postdoctoral research, funded through the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), was a participatory action research partnership with Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada. We created a violence prevention focus group held in-person with urban Inuit aged 18-25 led by Inuit co-facilitators. We sought to learn what young people already knew about preventing violence, and what they would advise other young Inuit. We also conducted an online survey of Facebook use among Inuit aged 18-25. Pauktuutit planned to use the results of the research to develop a violence prevention campaign aimed at young Inuit through Facebook.

I have experience working as a federal public servant, and remain a member of Canada’s Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction and its Aboriginal Resilience Working Group as well as Statistics Canada’s Advisory Committee on Social Conditions. I co-founded, with Kristyn French, the Applied Sociology Research Cluster of the Canadian Sociological Association (CSA). As author of Participatory Action Research: Becoming a Research for Social Change, I have been invited to do many guest lectures about methodology. How to do research ethically and well remains one of my top interests. I am also invited to speak internationally about topics related to gender, diversity, violence prevention, resilience and health.

In my research, I recognize the complexity and interconnectedness between policy, economy and society at all levels. Much good research already exists, but is not being utilized or even believed. Research needs to be communicated effectively to the public and the people who can use it. Where copyright allows, I make my publications available on the following site, which is also kept up to date more frequently than this page: https://carleton-ca.academia.edu/MarikaMorris

You can also follow me on Twitter: @MarikaMorris

Research Interests

  • Indigenous, particularly Inuit, violence prevention, health promotion and youth empowerment
  • Recruitment and retention of Indigenous employees and managers
  • Residential schools and the intergenerational transmission of trauma
  • Healthy communities
  • Suicide prevention
  • Gender, diversity and inclusion in public policy
  • Women’s leadership and collaborative leadership models
  • Dynamics of social change
  • Social capital and community resilience
  • Multiculturalism and integration
  • Public policy in the areas of poverty reduction, crime and corrections, mental health, and housing
  • Co-operatives
  • Community-engaged research/participatory action research
  • Program evaluation

Selected Publications

Books

  • Morris, Marika, with Martha Muzychka. 2002. Participatory Research and Action: A Guide to Becoming a Researcher for Social Change. Ottawa: Canadian Research Institute for the Advancement of Women.
  • Morris, Marika, avec Martha Muzychka. La recherche-action participative : Un outil pour le changement social ! Ottawa : Institut canadien de recherches sur les femmes.
  • Morris, Marika and Susannah Bush. Funding Sources for Research on Women/Sources de financement pour la recherche sur les femmes. Ottawa: Canadian Research Institute for the Advancement of Women, 2001.

Chapters in Books

  • Morris, Marika. (Forthcoming.) From gender equality indicators to Status of Women performance measures: Taking the measure of the Government of Canada. In Pauline Rankin and Christina Gabriel (Eds.), Critical Perspectives on Gender Equality Measurement in Canada. Vancouver: UBC Press.
  • Morris, Marika and the Canadian Research Institute for the Advancement of Women. 2013. Factsheet: Violence against women and girls. In Margaret Hobbs and Carla Rice (Eds.), Gender and Women’s Studies in Canada: Critical Terrain. (pp. 503-512). Toronto: Women’s Press.
  • Morris, Marika.  2011. Violence against women and girls. In Making a Difference Canada (Ed.), Making a Difference Canada: Communities Giving Voice to Sexual Assault Victims. (pp. 1-9) Vancouver: Making a Difference Canada.
  • Morris, Marika. 2004. What research reveals about gender, home care and caregiving: Overview and policy implications. In Karen R. Grant, Carol Amaratunga, Pat Armstrong, Madeline Boscoe, Ann Pederson, and Kay Willson (Eds.), Caring For/Caring About Women, Home Care and Unpaid Caregiving. (pp. 91-113). Aurora, ON: Garamond Press.
  • Morris, Marika. 2001. Home care and its impact on women’s vulnerability to poverty. In Gabrielle Lavigne, Tricia Burke and Manon Lemonde (Eds.), Feminist Definitions of Caring Communities and Healthy Lifestyles. (pp. 55- 60). Sudbury: Your Scrivener Press.
  • Morris, Marika. 2000. Shaping women’s health: Scope and methodologies. In Carol Amaratunga (Ed.), Made to Measure: Women, Gender and Equity(pp. 65-73). Halifax: Maritime Centre of Excellence for Women’s Health.
  • Morris, Marika. 1999. Harnessing the numbers: Potential use of gender equality indicators for the performance, measurement and promotion of gender-based analysis of public policy. In Leroy Stone, Zeynep Karman and Pamela Yaremko (Eds.), Gender Equality Indicators: Public Concerns and Public Policies(pp. 83-102).  Ottawa: Status of Women Canada, Statistics Canada, Human Resources Development Canada and Health Canada.
  • Morris, Marika. 1999. Conclusion…of sorts. In Sara Torres (Ed.), That Body Image Thing: Young Women Speak Out(pp. 102-104). Ottawa: Canadian Research Institute for the Advancement of Women.

Articles in Peer-Reviewed Journals

  • Morris, Marika. 2016. Inuit involvement in a participatory action research project on Inuit youth, violence prevention and health promotion. Études Inuit Studies 40(1): 105-125.
  • Morris, Marika. 2016. A statistical portrait of Inuit with a focus on increasing urbanization: Implications for policy and further research, Aboriginal Policy Studies 5(2): 4-31. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5663/aps.v5i2.27045
  • Morris, Marika and Claire Crooks. 2015. Structural and cultural factors in suicide prevention: The contrast between mainstream and Inuit approaches to understanding and preventing suicide. Journal of Social Work Practice 29(3): 321-338. DOI: Http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02650533.2015.1050655
  • Morris, Marika. 2015. The cooperative advantage for social inclusion meets uncooperative government regulation: International co-operative principles and co-operative housing regulation in the province of Ontario, Canada. Journal of Entrepreneurial and Organizational Diversity 4(1) 28-51. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5947/jeod.2015.003
  • Morris, Marika. 2002. Pauktuutit Inuit Women’s Association. Inuit Art Quarterly 17 (4): 16-27.
  • Morris, Marika. 2002. Unpaid work and women’s vulnerability to poverty. Canadian Review of Social Policy (49/50): 43-68.

Commentaries in Peer-reviewed Journals

Morris, Marika. 2016. Statistics Canada data collection on Inuit: The importance of consultation and context. Aboriginal Policy Studies 5(2): 136-148. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5663/aps.v5i2.25452

Published Research and Technical Reports

  • Morris, Marika. 2017. Indigenous Recruitment and Retention: Ideas and Best Practices from a Literature Review of Academic and Organizational Sources. Prepared for the Government of Canada’s Interdepartmental Circles on Indigenous Representation.
  • Morris, Marika. 2016. Women’s Leadership Matters: The Impact of Women’s Leadership in the Canadian Public Service. Ottawa: Carleton University Centre for Women in Politics and Public Leadership. [Le leadership féminin a de l’importance : L’incidence du leadership féminin au sein de la foction publique fédérale.]
  • Marika Morris, Colleen Watters, Vilma Dawson, Carol Muree Martin, Cecily Nicholson, Lise Martin, Michelle K. Owen, Kamal Sehgal and Sara Torres with Josée Charlebois. 2007. Integrating the Voices of Low-income Women into Policy Discussions on the Canada Social Transfer: First Nations Women in Vancouver, Immigrant and Refugee Women in Calgary and Women with Disabilities in Winnipeg. Ottawa: Canadian Research Institute for the Advancement of Women.
  • Morris, Marika, with Bénita Bunjun. 2007. Using Intersectional Feminist Frameworks in Research: A Resource for Embracing the Complexities of Women’s Lives. Ottawa: Canadian Research Institute for the Advancement of Women.
  • Morris, Marika, avec Bénita Bunjun. 2007. Faire la recherche avec les cadres d’analyse féministe intersectionelle : Un document de travail pour saisir la complexité de la vie des femmes. Ottawa : Institut canadien de recherches sur les femmes.
  • Morris, Marika. 2001. Gender-sensitive Home and Community Care and Caregiving Research: A Synthesis Paper. Ottawa: Health Canada.
  • Morris, Marika. 2001. “Media Analysis of Family Violence Issues in Selected Canadian Sources.” Paper prepared for the Family Violence Initiative, Health Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
  • Morris, Marika, Jane Robinson and Janet Simpson. 1999. The Changing Nature of Home Care and Its Impact on Women’s Vulnerability to Poverty. Ottawa: Status of Women Canada Policy Research Fund.
  • Morris, Marika. 1999. The Other Side of the Story: A Feminist Critique of Canada’s National Response to the UN Questionnaire on the Implementation of the Beijing Platform for Action. Ottawa: Canadian Feminist Alliance for International Action (FAFIA).
  • Morris, Marika. 1997. Gender-based Analysis Guide. Ottawa: Human Resources Development Canada.
  • Morris, Marika. 1997. Gender-based Analysis Backgrounder. Ottawa: Human Resources Development Canada.
  • Canadian Panel on Violence Against Women. 1993. Changing the Landscape: Ending Violence — Achieving Equality. Final Report. Ottawa: Minister of Supply and Services. (421 p) [Research contribution]

Book reviews in scholarly journals

  • Morris, Marika. 2013. Catherine Krull and Justyna Sempruch (eds.), A Life in Balance? Reopening the Family-Work Debate (Vancouver: UBC Press, 2011). Labour/Le Travail: Journal of Canadian Labour Studies 71 (Spring): 310-312.
  • Morris, Marika. 2000. Globalization and Gender: Development Perspectives and Interventions, by Angela Keller-Herzog. Resources for Feminist Research27(3 and 4) Fall/Winter 1999/2000: 139-140.

Editorial responsibilities

  • Article editor for Sage Open (2014-present), involving finding and assigning peer reviewers.
  • Peer-reviewer for Qualitative Health Research (2014-present)
  • Reviewer for the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC)/National Metropolis Research Calls (2009-10).
  • Peer-reviewer for Atlantis: A Women’s Studies Journal (c. 2003)
  • Peer reviewer for the Status of Women Canada Policy Research Fund (c. 2000-2003)

Selected Presentations

Academic conferences and events

  • “Connecting Inuit knowledge and approaches to youth violence prevention and mental health.” Canadian Conference on Promoting Healthy Relationships for Youth: Breaking Down the Silos in Addressing Violence and Mental Health. London, Ontario, Canada, February 15-17, 2017.
  • “Using social media to do violence prevention outreach with Inuit youth: A research partnership with Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada.” Canadian Sociological Association Conference, Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, Ottawa, June 1, 2015.
  • “Women in public service leadership: A critical conversation.” Carleton University Centre for Women in Politics and Public Leadership, Ottawa, February 24, 2015.
  • “Ethics, intersectionality and community participation in action research with Inuit youth on violence and mental health.” American Public Health Association 142ndAnnual Meeting and Exposition “Healthography”, New Orleans, November 15-19, 2014.
  • “Practical application of Inuit principles, ethics and methodology in research.” International Network of Indigenous Health Knowledge and Development (INIHKD) – Network Environments for Aboriginal Health Research (NEARH) 2014 conference, Winnipeg, Canada, October 5-10, 2014.
  • “Equality as a factor in disaster resilience: Canadian best practices in resilience data collection and stakeholder involvement.” Japan-Canada Policy Dialogue on Democracy, Diversity, Disasters: From Ottawa to Tokyo. Tokyo, Japan, March 14, 2014.
  • “Inuit youth, violence and social media outreach.” Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Canadian Prevention Science Cluster webinar, February 27, 2014.
  • “Towards an intersectional approach to measuring disaster resilience: The new Canadian Survey of Emergency Preparedness and Resilience.” Democracy, Diversity, Disasters: A Japan-Canada Policy Dialogue on Intersectionality and the Challenges of Contemporary Risk Governance. Ottawa, Canada, February 6, 2014.
  • “The value of the General Social Survey Social Identity Cycle for understanding security and resilience issues in Canada.” Measuring Migration, Integration and Identities. Association for Canadian Studies Metropolis Pre-Conference Forum on Social Research. Ottawa, March 13, 2013.
  • “The challenges of measuring community resilience for public policy.” Canadian Risks and Hazards Network Annual Symposium. Ottawa, October 19, 2011.
  • “Evaluation methods and challenges for community-based crime prevention initiatives.” Presentation to the 15th International Metropolis Conference, The Hague, Oct. 5, 2010.
  • Panel presentation on Knowledge Transfer: Connecting Socio-Cultural Research to Use in the Public and Private Sectors. 12thNational Metropolis Conference, Montreal, March 19, 2010.
  • “Organizing through obstacles: The co-op housing movement in Ontario.” Presentation to the Canadian Sociology and Anthropology Association, Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities, Ottawa, May 28, 2009.
  • “Envisioning comprehensive public policy to support mothers’ physical, emotional, social and economic well-being.” Association for Research on Mothering 11thAnnual Conference, “Maternal Health and Well-Being”, Toronto, Oct. 20, 2007.
  • “Representation of communities in the Canadian Museum of Civilization: Results of student projects.” Presentation to the Canadian Sociology and Anthropology Association, Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, Toronto, June 2, 2006.
  • “Community-building in a downtown housing co-op with a diverse population: Challenges to feminist theory and practice.” Presentation to the Canadian Women’s Studies Association, Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities, Toronto, May 31, 2006.
  • “Feminist approaches to housing and community: Applicability to the Canadian urban context.” Presentation to the Canadian Social Welfare Conference, Ottawa, June 15-17, 2003.
  • “Using participatory action research to foster social inclusion: Advantages and challenges.” Presentation to the Canadian Social Welfare Conference, Ottawa, June 15-17, 2003.
  • “The potential of using unpaid work data for feminist activism.” Presentation to the Canadian Sociology and Anthropology Association, Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities, Halifax, June 3, 2003.
  • “Feminist community successes and frustrations with participatory action research.” Presentation to the Canadian Sociology and Anthropology Association and Canadian Women’s Studies Association, Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities, Halifax, June 3, 2003.
  • “Feminist approaches to peacebuilding: Current Canadian movements, issues and strategies.” Presentation to the Canadian Women’s Studies Association, Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities, Halifax, June 2, 2003.
  • “The off-loading of health care onto women in communities: Implications for women’s equality.” Presentation to the OPIRG and Trent University conference Women, Health, and the Welfare State, Peterborough, Ont., March 23, 2002.
  • “Women, Health and Action / Femmes, santé et action.” Poster presentation, Social Determinants of Health Across the Life-Span: A Current Accounting and Policy Implications, York University, Toronto, Nov. 29 – Dec. 1, 2002.
  • “Concepts of efficiency, health care and the “Canadian Way”.” Presentation to the Association for Canadian Studies in the United States Colloquium Integration and Fragmentation in Canada and the United States, Ottawa, Sept. 20-21, 2002.
  • “Overview of themes, gaps and policy concerns.” Key note presentation to the National Think Tank on Gender and Unpaid Caregiving, Charlottetown, Nov. 8-10, 2001.
  • “Unpaid work and women’s vulnerability to poverty: Policy options.” Presentation to the Tenth Biennial Conference on Canadian Social Welfare Policy, Wealth, Health and Welfare: Tensions and Passions,University of Calgary, June 17 – 20th, 2001.
  • “Resources for research on social movements in Canada.” Presentation to the International Summer Seminar in Canadian Studies 2001, University of Ottawa, August 19, 2001.
  • “Women, poverty and Canadian public policy in an era of globalization.” Presentation to the International Colloquium: Globalization, Societies, Cultures. Congress of the Social Sciences and Humanities, Edmonton, May 29, 2000.
  • “A gender analysis of home care and women’s vulnerability to poverty”. Presentation to the BC Centre of Excellence for Women’s Health, Health Association of BC, BC Ministry of Health, BC Women’s Hospital and Health Centre, University of Victoria conference Building Bridges: Creating an Integrated Approach to Women’s Health, Victoria, April 29-May 1, 2000.
  • “The changing nature of home care and its impact on women’s vulnerability to poverty.” Presentation to the Canadian Research Institute for the Advancement of Women and Laurentian University conference Feminist Definitions of Caring Communities and Healthy Lifestyles/Les définitions féministes des modes de vie sains et des sociétes sensibles à l’être humain, Sudbury, October 15-17, 1999.
  • “The changing nature of home care and its impact on women’s vulnerability to poverty.” Presentation to the Maritime Centre of Excellence for Women’s Health international symposium Made to Measure: Designing Research, Policy and Action Approaches to Eliminate Gender Inequity/Sur mesure : formulation de demarches de recherché de politiques et de measures visant à éliminer l’inégalité homes/femmes, Halifax, October 3-6, 1999.

Selected non-academic presentations

  • “The business case for women’s leadership in public institutions.” Speaker and panelist. United Nations Development Programme and New York University Women’s Initiative, New York City, December 6, 2016.
  • “Embracing Alberta’s diversity: Using gender and diversity analysis to develop better public policy.” Policy Matters Conference 2016: Policy Development in a Dynamic Environment, Edmonton, Alberta, June 15, 2016.
  • “The potential and pitfalls of public sector performance measures for gender equality.” GBA+: From Research to Policy to Measurement workshop, Ottawa, May 7, 2014.
  • “Inuit youth, violence and social media outreach: A research project you can shape.” Nunavut Sivuniksavut, Ottawa, February 26, 2014.
  • “Survey of Emergency Preparedness and Resilience.” Canada’s Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction Advisory Committee, Ottawa, June 4, 2013.
  • “Kanishka Project gender and diversity research investments.” Unusual Suspects? In Pursuit of Gender and Diversity in Public Security. Status of Women Canada workshop, Government Conference Centre. Ottawa, May 8, 2013.
  • “Women and poverty: Brief to the Subcommittee on Cities
  • of the Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology”, Senate Subcommittee on Cities, Ottawa, June 4, 2008.
  • “Compliance with the Personal Information Protection and Electronics Document Act (PIPED)”, Canadian Museums Association, Ottawa, April 1, 2004.
  • “Exploring the use of gender and diversity analysis and integrated feminist analysis in the work of public policy research institutes.” Keynote speaker. Integrated Feminist Analysis Round Table, Canadian Research Institute for the Advancement of Women, Ottawa, Feb. 19-20, 2004.
  • “The need for gender and diversity analysis in housing policy.” Invited speaker, Gender and Diversity Analysis and Housing Policy Development in Newfoundland and Labrador Conference, St. John’s, November, 2003.
  • “Feminist research, action and change.” Presenter/instructor/facilitator of a series of full-day workshops for academics and community groups on participatory action research for social change.
  • Yellowknife, April 7, 2001. (Co-sponsored with the NWT Human Rights Society.)
  • Edmonton, April 4, 2001. Co-facilitated with Laura Bonnett.
  • Victoria, March 31, 2001. Co-sponsored with the BC Immigrant and Visible Minority Women’s Association, and co-facilitated with Dr. Jo-Anne Lee.
  • Fredericton, Oct. 26, 2002. Co-sponsored with the New Brunswick Advisory Council on the Status of Women.
  • Iqualuit, Feb. 2003. Co-sponsored with Canadian Heritage, and co-facilitated with Cindy Rennie in Inuktitut and English.
  • “The state of gender-based research in Canada.” Presentation to the Hon. Minister for Women’s Affairs for Ethiopia and Parliament of Ethiopia Women’s Affairs Committee, Ottawa, Aug. 17, 2001.
  • “Trends affecting gender equality.” Presentation to Human Resources Development Canada Strategic Policy Branch, Ottawa, Nov. 23, 2000.
  • “Building better communities.” Presentation to the Year 2000 Governor General’s Canadian Study Conference, Ottawa, May 22, 2000.

Conference and Workshop Planning

  • Co-organizing four sessions at the Canadian Sociological Association conference at the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, Ottawa, 2015: Indigenous and Applied Sociologies; Policy and Program Development and Evaluation; Applied Sociology Methods; and Careers in Applied Sociology.
  • Organized a workshop entitled “Measuring and Building Community Resilience to Disaster” (March 3) at the 14thNational Metropolis Conference “Future Immigration Policies: Challenges and Opportunities for Canada”, Toronto February 29-March 3, 2012; co-organized a plenary on community resilience (March 2) at the same conference.
  • Organized and chaired a workshop on “Measuring Community Resilience for Policy Purposes” (October 19) at the Canadian Risks and Hazards Network (CRHNet) Annual Symposium, Ottawa, October 19-21, 2011.
  • Co-organized and chaired a full-day pre-conference workshop entitled “The Multiple Dimensions of Community Resilience” (March 23); organized and chaired a workshop entitled “Criminal Justice Data and Diversity” (March 25); chaired “Strengthening Supports for At-Risk and Gang-Involved Immigrant Youth” (March 24); and co-organized “Community Resilience to Crime: An Integrated Policy Approach” (March 25) at the 13th National Metropolis Conference “Immigration: Bringing the World to Canada”, Vancouver, March 23-26, 2011.
  • Co-organized a full-day pre-conference workshop entitled “Community-Based Collaborations: Working together to respond to organized crime and violent extremism” (March 18); organized a workshop entitled “Integrating Border Visions and Concerns” (March 20) and co-organized a workshop entitled “Métropoles et réseaux informels : analyses transnationales” (March 19) at the 12th National Metropolis Conference “Immigration and Diversity: Crossroads of Cultures, Engine of Economic Development”, Montreal, March 18-21, 2010.

Committees, clusters and scholarly advice

  • Established and co-lead, with Kristyn Frank, the Applied Sociology Research Cluster of the Canadian Sociological Association, July 2014 to the present.
  • Appointed to Statistics Canada’s Advisory Committee on Social Conditions in February, 2014. This body advises the Chief Statistician about data needs and the priorities and direction of the Social and Aboriginal Statistics Division. This is a three-year term.
  • Advised Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) First Nations Adaptation evaluation study team, which is performing comprehensive multi-site research for the Mental Health Commission of Canada, on methodology, 2013-2014.

Selected Awards

  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Postdoctoral Fellow (2013-15) – fellowship held at the Faculty of Education, Western University
  • Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) Community Based Research Fellowship (2013) (declined, as could not be held concurrently with CIHR fellowship)
  • Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Doctoral Fellowship
  • Student-Parent Award (2005)
  • Naida Waite Graduate Scholarship (2004-05)
  • Charlotte Whitton Fellowship in Canadian Urban Life (2003)
  • Robert McDougall Scholarship (2003)
  • Rudelle Hall Memorial Scholarship (2003)
  • Thomas Betz Memorial Award (2002)
  • John Lyndhurst Kingston Memorial Scholarship (2002)
  • Maureen O’Neil Award in Women’s Studies (1988)
  • Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) Undergraduate Research Award, 1986

Courses Taught

Instructor

  • FYSM 1409 (Social Change in Canada) 2007-08
  • CDNS 4300 (Communities in Canada) 2006

Guest lectures

  • Guest lecture on participatory action research in a graduate methods course, FEM 5503 (Méthodologies feministes), University of Ottawa, March 2, 2004.
  • Guest lecture, fourth year undergraduate/first year graduate Women’s Studies Seminar on gender-based analysis of public policy, McGill University, winter term, 2001.
  • Guest lecture on feminist research methodology, SCS 2150 C (Introduction to Social Research Methodology), University of Ottawa, Jan. 17, 2007.
  • Guest lecture on participatory action research methodology, WOMN 3808 (Theories and Methods in Feminist Perspective), Carleton University, March 28, 2007.
  • Guest lectures on women in Canadian society, CDN 1100 (Introduction to Canadian Studies), University of Ottawa, Nov. 15 and 17, 2006.
  • Guest lecture on an overview of women’s studies and feminist methods in CDNS 3000 (Interdisciplinary Canadian Theory and Methods), Carleton University, March 21, 2006.
  • Guest lecture on the status of women in Canada, CDNS 1000 (Introduction to Canadian Studies), Carleton University, March 7, 2002.

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