Photo of Kimberly B. Stratton

Kimberly B. Stratton

Associate Professor

Degrees:A.B. (Barnard), M.T.S. (Harvard), M.Phil, Ph.D. (Columbia)
Phone:613-520-2600 x 1384
Email:kim.stratton@carleton.ca
Office:2A47 Paterson Hall
Office Hours: Thursdays 1:00-2:30 or by appt

Biography

Kimberly Stratton received her B.A. degree (1991) in English and Religion from Barnard College in New York City. She completed a Master of Theological Studies at Harvard University (1995), concentrating on scripture and interpretation. In the middle of her master’s degree she studied in Israel at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem for a year and a half (1992-1994), where she passed the Hebrew Language Equivalency Exam (ptor). She returned to New York City to pursue doctoral studies at Columbia University, completing her Ph.D. (2002) in the History of Religions in Late Antiquity. Her research covers the fields of early Christianity, Rabbinic Judaism, as well as Greco-Roman culture and religion.

Research Interests

  • Religion, violence, and social identity in Antiquity
  • Ancient magic
  • Gender

Courses

HUMS 1000 Myth and Symbol (F/W)
RELI 2710 A, Maccabees to Muhammad (F)
RELI 4850 A, Seminar in Study of Religion (W)

Publications

Books:

Naming the Witch: Magic, Ideology, and Stereotype in the Ancient World. New York: Columbia University Press, 2007.

Daughters of Hecate: Women and Magic in Antiquity. Edited with assistance from Dayna Kalleres. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.

Ambiguities, Complexities, and Half-Forgotten Adversaries: Crossing Boundaries in Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity. Co-edited with Andrea Lieber. Journal for the Study of Judaism Supplements Series, edited by John J. Collins. Leiden: Brill (2016).

Edited Journal Volume:

History of Religions. Special Issue on violence and communal identity in ancient religion. (forthcoming).

Chapters/Articles

• Narrating Violence, Narrating Self: Exodus and Identity in Early Judaism and Rabbinic Literature (in progress).

• Magic in the Greco-Roman World up to and including the Republic. Cambridge History of Magic and Witchcraft in the West. Ed. David J. Collins. Cambridge University Press (in press, expected early 2015).

• Interrogating the Magic-Gender Connection. In Daughters of Hecate: Women and Magic in Antiquity. Edited by Kimberly Stratton with Dayna Kalleres. Oxford University Press, 2014: 1-37.

• Magic, Abjection, and Gender in Ancient Literature. In Daughters of Hecate: Women and Magic in Antiquity. Edited by Kimberly Stratton with Dayna Kalleres. Oxford University Press, 2014: 152-180.

• Identity. In The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Mediterranean Religions. Edited by Barbette Stanley Spaeth. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013: 220-251.

• Magic Discourse in the Ancient World. Defining Magic: A Reader. Edited by Michael Stausberg and Bernd-Christian Otto. Critical Categories in the Study of Religion series. London: Equinox Publishing. 2012: 243-254.

• The Eschatological Arena: Reinscribing Roman Violence in Fantasies of the End Times. Biblical Interpretation: A Journal of Contemporary Approaches, vol.17, nos. 1-2. January 2009: 45-76. Available on-line

Republished in Violence, Scripture, and Textual Practice in Early Judaism and Christianity. Edited by Ra’anan S. Boustan, Alex P. Jassen, Calvin J. Roetzel. Leiden: E.J. Brill. 2010: 45-76.

• Curse Rhetoric, Violence, and the Politics of Identity in Early Judaism and Christianity. In Identity and Interaction among Jews, Christians, and Others. Edited by Philip Harland and Zeba Crook. Sheffield/Phoenix Press, 2007: 18-30.

• The Rhetoric of “Magic” in Early Christian Discourse: Gender, Power, and the Construction of “Heresy.” In Mapping Gender in Ancient Religious Discourses. Ed. Todd Penner and Caroline Vander Stichele. Leiden: E.J. Brill, 2007: 89-114.

• Imagining Power: Magic, Miracle and the Social Context of Rabbinic Self-Representation. Journal of the American Academy of Religion, vol. 73, no.2. June, 2005: 361-393.

• Male Magicians and Female Victims: Understanding a Pattern of Magic Representation in Early Christian Literature. lectio difficilior 2 [2004] ( n.p. cited May 10, 2005). Online

Honours and Awards

F. W. Beare Book Award, Canadian Society of Biblical Studies (for Naming the Witch: Magic, Ideology and Stereotype in the Ancient World), 2008.

Short-list for Best First Book in the History of Religions Award (for Naming the Witch: Magic, Ideology and Stereotype in the Ancient World), American Academy of Religion, 2008.