Photo of Danielle Fraser

Danielle Fraser

Adjunct Research Professor

Degrees:B.Sc. (University of Calgary), M.Sc. (University of Calgary), Ph.D. (Carleton University)
Phone:613-566-4722
Email:Dfraser@nature.ca
Office:B2251 Natural Heritage Campus, Canadian Museum of Nature
Website:Browse

Current Research

I am a Research Scientist at the Canadian Museum of Nature and Associate at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. I am a palaeoecologist and evolutionary biologist interested in how and why mammal communities form with the goal of understanding the emergence of modern mammal communities and how they might change under ongoing global change. I use a wide array of analytical tools including, but not limited to, computational biology, phylogenetics, palaeodietary methods, field work, and stable isotopes. My research program is multidisciplinary and integrates the study of both extant and extinct mammals. 

Selected Publications

Fraser, D., R.J. Haupt, and W. A. Barr. 2018. Phylogenetic signal in tooth wear dietary niche proxies. Ecology and Evolution 8: 5355-5368. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/ece3.4052

Fraser, D. and S. K. Lyons. 2017. Biotic interchange has structured Western Hemisphere mammal communities. Global Ecology and Biogeography 26: 1408-1422. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/geb.12667/abstract;jsessionid=3F2ED4E116D6EA6A6BAF029CECE70760.f02t01

Fraser, D. 2017. Can latitudinal richness gradients be measured in the terrestrial fossil record? Paleobiology 43: 479-494. http://paleobiol.geoscienceworld.org/content/43/3/479

Fraser, D., R. Gorelick, and N. Rybczynski. 2015. Macroevolution and climate change influence phylogenetic community assembly of North American hoofed mammals. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 114: 485-494. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bij.12457/abstract

Fraser, D., C. Hassall, R. Gorelick, and N. Rybczynski. 2014. Mean annual precipitation explains spatiotemporal patterns of Cenozoic mammal beta diversity and latitudinal diversity gradients in North America. PLoS One 9: e106499. http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0106499

Fraser, D. and N. Rybczynski. 2014. Complexity of ruminant masticatory evolution. Journal of Morphology 275:1093-1102. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jmor.20284/abstract

Fraser, D. and J. M. Theodor. 2013. Ungulate diets reveal patterns of grassland evolution in North America. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 369: 409-421. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031018212006311

Fraser, D. and J. M. Theodor. 2011. Comparing ungulate dietary proxies using discriminant function analysis. Journal of Morphology 272: 1513-1526. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jmor.11001/abstract

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