Hub Affiliates are members of MeWeRTH that are external to the Carleton University community with a shared interest in mental health, well-being, resilience and collaboration. You can learn more about our Hub Affiliates below:

Dr. Kim Corace

Keywords: substance use, mental health, concurrent disorders, health behaviour change, health service delivery

Research interests

My research work focuses on mental health, substance use, stigma, public health, and health system service utilization. I work collaboratively with partners across the system to  develop, implement, and evaluate innovative interventions that lead to improved treatment access and outcomes for populations with substance use and mental health co-morbidities, with a focus on developing collaborative hospital-community models of care. My work also focuses on health behaviour change, including how behaviour change theories can be used to guide and inform novel interventions to facilitate health behaviour change (i.e., healthcare worker vaccination uptake and hand hygiene adherence) as well as the implementation of evidence into healthcare practice. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, my research is currently exploring the mental health and substance use impacts of COVID-19 on people with pre-existing mental health and substance use problems, as well as the impact of changes in service provision and care delivery due to COVID-19.

Selected Publications

Hamel, C., Corace, K., Hersi, M., Rice, D., Willows, M., Macpherson, P., Sproule, B., Flores-Aranda, J., Garber, G., Esmaeilisaraji, L., Skidmore, B, Canning, C., Porath, A., Ortiz-Nunez, R., Hutton, B. (accepted). Psychosocial and pharmacologic interventions for methamphetamine addiction: protocol for a scoping review of the literature. Systematic Reviews.

Overington, L., Bell, S., Ares, I., & Corace, K. (2020). Substance use and COVID-19: What do psychologists need to know and how can they help? Psynopsis, 42 (3): 18-19.

Wolfe, D., Corace, K., Rice, D., Smith, A., Kanji, S., Conn, D., Willows, M., Garber, G., Abramovici, H., Puxty, J., Moghadam, E., Skidmore, B., Garritty, C., Thavorn. K., Moher, D., & Hutton, B. (2020). The effects of medical and non-medical cannabis use in older adults: A scoping review protocol. BMJ Open.

Dragomir, A., Lavoie, K., Boucher, V., Bacon, S., Gemme, C., Szczepanik, G., Corace, K., Campbell, T., Vallis, M., Garber, G., Rouleau, C., Rabi, D., Diodati, J., & Ghali, W. (accepted). An international Delphi consensus study to define motivational communication in the context of developing a training program for physicians. Translational Behavioral Medicine.

Agterberg, S., Schubert, N., Overington, L., Corace, K. (2020). Treatment Barriers among Individuals with Co-occurring Substance Use and Mental Health Problems: Examining Gender Differences. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 112, 29-35.

Corace, K., Willows, M., Schubert, N., Overington, L., Mattingly, S., Clark, E., Leduc, N., Hutton, B., & Hebert, G. (2020). Alcohol Medical Intervention Clinic: A rapid access addiction medicine model reduces emergency department visits. Journal of Addiction Medicine, 14(2), 163–171.

Corace, K., Wyman, J., Suschinsky, K., Leece, P., & Porath, A. (November, 2020). Evaluating the impact of the Ontario COVID-19 Opioid Agonist Therapy Guidelines. Presented at International Society of Addiction Medicine – Canadian Society of Addiction Medicine Joint Conference, Hosted Virtually in Canada.

Gary Goldfield, PhD., C. Psych.

Key words: Mental health, physical activity, screen time, eating behaviour, pediatric obesity

Research Interests

Dr. Goldfield is a Senior Scientist with the Healthy Active Living and Obesity (HALO) Research Group at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Professor of Pediatrics and Psychology at the University of Ottawa, and an Adjunct Research Professor in the Department of Psychology at Carleton University. He is also a registered clinical psychologist. Dr. Goldfield’s main research interests focus on: 1) evaluating behavioural interventions for the treatment and prevention of childhood obesity and related complications; 2) psychological and biological determinants of disordered eating and obesity, and iii) effects of physical activity and sedentary behavior (especially screen time and digital media) on mental health and well-being.

Selected Publications

Goldfield GS, Mallory R, Parker T, Lumb A, Cunningham T, Parker K, Legg C, Prud’homme D, Adamo K. (2007). Effects of modifying physical activity and television viewing on psychosocial adjustment in overweight and obese children. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 32 (7), 783-793.

Goldfield GS, Kenny GP, Alberga AS, Prud’homme D, Hadjiyannakis S, Gougeon R, Phillips P, Tulloch H, Malcolm J, Doucette S, Wells GA, Ma J, Cameron JD, and Sigal RJ. (2015). Effects of aerobic training, resistance training, or both on psychological health in adolescents with obesity: The HEARTY randomized controlled trial. Journal of Consulting & Clinical Psychology, 83(6):1123-35.

Murray M, Maras D, Goldfield GS. (2016). Excessive Time on Social Networking Sites and Disordered Eating Behaviors Among Undergraduate Students: Appearance and Weight Esteem as Mediating Pathways. Cyberpsychology Behaviour & Social Networking; 19(12):709-715.

Cameron JD, Chaput JP, Sjödin AM, Goldfield GS. (2017). Brain on Fire: Incentive Salience, Hedonic Hot Spots, Dopamine, Obesity, and Other Hunger Games. Annual Review of Nutrition; 37; 183-205.

Mougharbel F. & Goldfield GS. (In press). Psychological Correlates of Sedentary Screen Time Behaviour Among Children and Adolescents: a Narrative Review. Current Obesity Reports

Michael Martin

Research Interests

Dr. Martin’s areas of expertise and research interests include: (a) screening for mental illness; (b) trajectories of mental illness and self-harm behaviours; (c) risk and protective factors for mental health and behavioural outcomes; (d) treatment of mental illness and self-harm behaviours; (e) system integration across jurisdictions and ministries responsible for providing health and social services

Selected Publications

Martin, M. S., Potter, B. K., Crocker, A. G., Wells, G. A., Grace, R. M., & Colman, I. (2018). Mental health treatment patterns following screening at intake to prison. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 86(1), 15–23. https://doi.org/10.1037/ccp0000259

Martin, M. S., Wells, G. A., Crocker, A. G., Potter, B. K., & Colman, I. (2018a). Decision curve analysis as a framework to estimate the potential value of screening or other decision-making aids. International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research, 27(1), e1601. https://doi.org/10.1002/mpr.1601

Martin, M. S., Wells, G. A., Crocker, A. G., Potter, B. K., & Colman, I. (2018b). Mental health screening, treatment, and institutional incidents: A propensity score matched analysis of long-term outcomes of screening. International Journal of Forensic Mental Health, 17(2), 133–144. https://doi.org/10.1080/14999013.2018.1451415

Martin, M. S., Eljdupovic, G., Mckenzie, K., & Colman, I. (2015). Risk of violence by inmates with childhood trauma and mental health needs. Law and Human Behavior, 39(6), 614–623. https://doi.org/10.1037/lhb0000149

For a complete list of publications, please see Dr. Martin’s Google Scholar profile.

 

MaryAnn Notarianni, MSW

Key words: Mental health, knowledge mobilization, stakeholder engagement, implementation

Research Interests

MaryAnn has been working in leadership roles in mental health intermediary organizations over the past decade. MaryAnn is currently the Vice President, Knowledge Mobilization at the Centre of Excellence on PTSD, based at The Royal. MaryAnn oversees initiatives and contributes to research projects to support the uptake and implementation of evidence-based practices to improve mental health services for Veterans and their families. MaryAnn has deep experience with stakeholder engagement, particularly youth and family engagement in mental health systems.

Selected Publications

Danseco, E., Notarianni, M., & Kocourek, J. (2020). Quality Standards on Youth Engagement and Family Engagement: Defining Excellence for Engagement. Canadian Journal of Community Mental Health. DOI: https://doi.org/10.7870/cjcmh-2020-011

Zelmer, J., van Hoof, K., Notarianni, M., van Mierlo, T., Schellenberg, M. & Tannenbaum, C. (2018).An Assessment Framework for e-Mental Health Apps in Canada: Results of a Modified Delphi Process JMIR Mhealth Uhealth. DOI: 10.2196/10016

Notarianni, M., Sundar, P. & Carter, C. (2015). Just in time: How evidence-on-demand services support decision-making in Ontario’s child and youth mental health sector. Evidence & Policy. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/174426415X14298824732060

Resources

Centre of Excellence on PTSD: https://veteransmentalhealth.ca/

Travis Sztainert, Ph.D.

Keywords: knowledge translation, addiction, mental health, systems change

Research Interests

Travis (He/Him) is the Knowledge Mobilization Specialist at Frayme. As an expert in knowledge mobilization, Travis regularly consults with stakeholders to foster collaboration and provide the best available evidence to support their work. He works to develop a variety of knowledge mobilization products from large-scale evidence reviews to brief reports and data analyses, to digital resources and social network analysis to demonstrate impact. Outside of Frayme, Travis works as a research consultant with various addiction and mental health-related organizations. In addition, he has a passion for developing knowledge mobilization training across sectors and helped develop and teach the Certificate in Knowledge Mobilization at the University of Guelph.

Selected Publications

Sztainert, T. (2020, September). Testing the Waters Before Diving In: Determining the Type of Knowledge Gap and the Readiness of Knowledge to Fill It. Invited presentation to the Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability & Rehabilitation Research at American Institutes for Research, Online. Availabe at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eGirF_iyQwg

Sztainert, T., Hay, R., Wohl, M. J. A., & Abizaid, A. (2018). Hungry to gamble? Ghrelin as a predictor of persistent gambling in the face of loss. Biological Psychology. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.10.011

Matheson, F., Sztainert, T., Lakman, Y., Jane Steele, S., Ziegler, C. P., & Ferentzy, P. (2018). Prevention and treatment of problem gambling among older adults: A scoping review. Journal of Gambling Issues, 39, 6-66. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.4309/jgi.2018.39.2

Sztainert, T., Kim, H. S., & Wohl, M. J. A. (2014). Knowledge translation and exchange in gambling research: A beginners guide. Responsible Gambling Review, 1, 64-74.

Resources

Frayme: www.frayme.ca

Personal Website: www.drszt.ca

 

Aïda Warah, Ph.D., C. Psych.

Keywords: wellness, eco-anxiety, climate change, personal values, culture, leadership, lifestyle/behavioral change

Research Interests

Dr. Warah works in a space she calls “Psy-ecology”, blending her background in clinical and organizational psychology with her experience in environmental issues and solutions.  Her main interest is to identify effective ways of enabling individual adults to contribute to solutions to climate change.  Dr. Warah focuses her research on the personal and cultural variables that promote individual empowerment and feelings of wellness, in response to the ecological crisis.

In addition to university teaching, Aïda directed at Environment and Climate Change Canada the Wellness Programs including values and ethics and mental health for several years. She also led the Green House Gas Inventory Division for one year.  In 2019, Aïda founded a not for profit organization – GentleWays for OurPlanet – to promote ways of empowering individual action against global warming.

Selected Publications

Frechette, P., Warah, A. (2020) Auditing organisational culture in the public sector.

Warah, A. (2004) Relational Accountability, values and ethics: An existential perspective  National Ethics Symposium. Values and Ethics in the Public Sector: How to serve the public interest. Saint Paul University

Warah, A. Governance, Power and Ego development: Toward the democratic organization 

i4ThePlanet App

The i4ThePlanet (Eye for The Planet) is a mobile app designed to enable individuals develop sustainable lifestyle while building wellness.

It supports simple daily actions under six lifestyle categories: Food, Fashion/Electronics, Travel/Energy, Materials, Wellness, and Leadership.

The app is free, without ads or any commercial goals whatsoever. To download it at Google or Apple stores click on the links below:

https://apps.apple.com/us/app/i4theplanet/id1557492436

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.i4theplanet

 

Matthew Young, Ph.D.

Keywords: addiction, substance use epidemiology, gambling, public health, health economics

Research Interests

Matthew has been working in the field of substance use and addiction for over 20 years. His research interests include the epidemiology of substance use, public health responses to substance use harms, the economics of substance use, the early detection and sharing of information on emerging drug-related health threats, new psychoactive substances, and gambling. He is currently co-chair of the Canadian Community Epidemiology Network on Drug Use and is principal investigator of the Canadian Substance Use Costs and Harms project and the project to develop Canada’s first Lower Risk Gambling Guidelines.

Selected Publications

Canadian Substance Use Costs and Harms Scientific Working Group. (2020). Canadian substance use costs and harms (2015-2017). (Prepared by the Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research and the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction.) Ottawa, Ont.: Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction. Available at: https://www.ccsa.ca/sites/default/files/2020-06/CSUCH-Canadian-Substance-Use-Costs-Harms-Report-2020-en.pdf

Maloney-Hall, B. Wallingford, S. C., & Young, M. M. (2020). Psychotic disorder and cannabis use: Canadian hospitalization trends, 2006-2015. Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention in Canada: Research, Policy and Practice. Available at: https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/documents/services/reports-publications/health-promotion-chronic-disease-prevention-canada-research-policy-practice/vol-40-no-5-6-2020/hpcdp.40.5-6.06.pdf

Payer, D.E., Young, M.M., Hall, B., Mill, C., Leclerc, P., Buxton, J., the Canadian Community Epidemiology Network on Drug Use, & the National Drug Checking Working Group. (2020). Adulterants, contaminants and co-occurring substances in drugs on the illegal market in Canada: An analysis of data from drug seizures, drug checking and urine toxicology. Ottawa, Ont.: Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction. Available at: https://www.ccsa.ca/sites/default/files/2020-04/CCSA-CCENDU-Adulterants-Contaminants-Co-occurring-Substances-in-Drugs-Canada-Report-2020-en.pdf

Jesseman, R. & Young, M. M. (2018).  Pulling levers to mitigate health costs of cannabis. Policy Options. Available at: http://policyoptions.irpp.org/magazines/august-2018/pulling-levers-to-mitigate-health-costs-of-cannabis/  

Young, M. M., Pirie, T., Buxton, J. A., & Hosein, F. S. (2015). The rise of overdose deaths involving fentanyl and the value of early warning. Canadian Journal of Addiction, 6(3), 13-17. Available at https://www.csam-smca.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/CSAM-December2015.pdf

Young, M. M., Dubeau, C., & Corazza, O. (2015). Detecting a signal in the noise: monitoring the global spread of novel psychoactive substances using media and other open source information. Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and Experimental, 30, 319-326. Available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4584493/

Young, M. M., Stevens, A., Galipeau, J., Pirie, T., Garritty, C., Singh, K., . . . Moher, D. (2014). Effectiveness of brief interventions as part of the Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) model for reducing the non-medical use of psychoactive substances: a systematic review. Systematic Reviews, 3(50). Available at: http://www.systematicreviewsjournal.com/content/3/1/50