I am pleased to report that the Carleton University Senate has approved the use of flexible, compassionate grading options for undergraduate students in the Fall 2020 and Winter 2021 terms.

Carleton first expanded the use of the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (SAT/UNS) grading modes in the Winter 2020 term in response to the sudden disruption caused by the pandemic in March. This latest extension of their use reflects the continual need to adapt to ongoing challenges, especially in relation to technology, workspaces, financial concerns, health and other stressors.

These alternate grading modes will ensure students are not unduly disadvantaged by the disruptions caused by the pandemic. SAT/UNS grades are not used in the calculation of CGPA, which means that changes in academic performance due to the current disruption will not affect students’ permanent records.

Converting a Failing Grade to UNS

The Registrar’s Office will automatically convert F grades to UNS for undergraduate students for the Fall 2020 and Winter 2021 terms. This measure excludes failing grades that are assigned as a result of an academic integrity offence. 

Converting a Passing Grade to SAT

Undergraduate students can choose to convert one (1) passing grade to SAT for a maximum of one half-credit course in the Fall 2020 term. Similar measures for the Winter 2021 term may be considered at a later time. Students can request this grade conversion after their grade appears in Carleton Central. Information regarding how students can request this grade conversion will be provided to students later this month. Once the change is made, it cannot be reversed. The originally recorded grade will remain available through the Registrar’s Office in the event it is needed for other purposes. Notably, if the course in question is a prerequisite for other courses, students will still be required to meet the minimum prerequisite grade, whether or not that grade has been replaced by SAT on the official transcript.

Carleton’s instructional community has responded to the many complex challenges posed by the ongoing pandemic by adapting in compassionate and creative ways. I would like to take this opportunity to thank all teaching staff once again for demonstrating care and concern for students as we navigate these challenging times. Undergraduate students will be notified of the alternate grading modes today and directed to a Frequently Asked Questions page on the Academic Advising Centre website.

Sincerely,

Jerry Tomberlin
Provost and Vice-President (Academic)