Photo of Valerie Percival

Valerie Percival

Associate Professor of International Affairs - Health and Conflict, Post Conflict Health Reconstruction, Health Systems, HIV/AIDS and Conflict Analysis

Phone:613-520-2600 x 6658
Email:valerie.percival@carleton.ca
Office:5319 Richcraft Hall
CV:View

Valerie Percival is an Associate Professor at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs (NPSIA) at Carleton University, a Senior Fellow at the Canadian International Council and a member of the Lancet-SIGHT Commission on Peace, Justice, and Gender Equality for Healthy Societies. Her current research focuses on three areas: the measurement and meaning of the suffering of civilians in violent conflict and humanitarian emergencies; the complexity of engagement in health systems; and the promise and perils of policy networks. Prior to joining NPSIA, she held positions at the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade as well as the International Crisis Group, where she was director of their Kosovo Office. She also worked with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Guinea as well as the Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO). She has provided testimony to the European Parliament, the US Congress, and Canadian Parliament, has published in International Studies Review, the Journal of Peace Research, Globalization and Health, and Conflict and Health and is a frequent contributor to Open Canada.

Valerie holds a Doctorate in Public Health from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, a Masters degree from NPSIA and an honours BA in Peace and Conflict Studies from the University of Toronto. Through her research and professional experiences, Valerie has experienced the difficulties of international engagement in conflict-affected states, the challenges of policy development, and the risks and rewards of inter-disciplinary research. With her husband Shawn Barber, she has two sons and a Mozambican rescue dog.

Expertise

Health and Conflict, Post Conflict Health Reconstruction, Health Systems, HIV/AIDS, Conflict Analysis