Photo of Aubrey Anable

Aubrey Anable

Assistant Professor, Film Studies

Degrees:M.A. and Ph.D. (University of Rochester), B.A. (University of California, Santa Barbara)
Phone:613-520-2600 x 5046
Email:aubrey.anable@carleton.ca
Office:416 St. Patrick's Building

Aubrey Anable received a Ph.D. in Visual and Cultural Studies from the University of Rochester. Her research examines digital media aesthetics, video games, affect, cybernetics, critical theory, gender and media technologies, experimental film and video, and queer web cultures.

Her book Playing with Feelings: Video Games and Affect (University of Minnesota Press, Spring 2018) provides an account of why video games compel us to play and how they constitute a contemporary structure of feeling emerging alongside the last sixty years of computerized living. Her articles have appeared in the journals AfterimageTelevision & New MediaMediascapeAda, and Social Text BlogShe has contributed to the collection Game On, Hollywood! Essays on the Intersection of Video Games and Cinema (McFarland, 2013) as well as The Encyclopedia of Video Games (Greenwood, 2012). She is currently co-editing The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Visual Culture.

Anable is a member of the Fembot Collective and an advisory editor for the journal Camera Obscura.

Recent Publications

 book cover image

“Labor/Leisure.” Time: A Vocabulary of the Present. Ed. Amy J. Elias and Joel Burges. New York: New York University Press, 2016. 234-254.

Cover image: Ada: A Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology, Issue No. 2, June 2013

Casual Games, Time Management, and the Work of Affect,” in Ada: A Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology, Issue No. 2, June 2013.

Cover image: Game On, Hollywood! Essays on the Intersection of Video Games and Cinema

“Playing (in) the City: The Warriors and Images of Urban Disorder,” in Game On, Hollywood! Essays on the Intersection of Video Games and Cinema, edited by Gretchen Papazian and Joseph Michael Sommers (McFarland Press, 2013)

“The Architecture Machine Group’s Aspen Movie Map: Techno-Paranoia and Urban Crisis in the 1970s,” in Television & New Media, November 2012, 13 (6) p. 498-519

Bad Techno-Subjects: Griefing Is Serious Business,” in Mediascape: UCLA’s Journal of Cinema and Media Studies. Fall 2008.