Photo of Tim Haats

Tim Haats

Assistant Professor

    Email:tim.haats@carleton.ca
    Phone:613-520-2600, ext. 7050
    Building:Mackenzie, Room 2498
    Department:School of Industrial Design
    Website:https://www.timhaats.com/

    Biography

    Tim Haats is an experienced product designer, entrepreneur, researcher, and educator with expertise in product development, service design, and small business management. As an Assistant Professor in the School of Industrial Design at Carleton University, Tim utilizes his practical skills, knowledge, and passion for design and business to explore the relationship between design and entrepreneurship, and how emerging design practices support innovation.

    Tim defines himself as a pracademic with active roles in both academia and professional practice. He is a small corporate business owner in the service industry managing many organizational aspects from daily operations to strategic planning. He is also a mentor and consultant for product design and entrepreneurship, working with students, inventors, and start-ups on different projects in various capacities. With this, Tim approaches his research initiatives from a practitioner’s perspective with a focus on bridging practical and theoretical knowledge. A large part of his work is dedicated towards fostering industry partnerships, building professional relationships, and continuing to strengthen the links between research, academics, and professional practice.

    RESEARCH

    Tim’s research interests revolve around design, entrepreneurship, and business, and the emerging design practices that support innovation. This includes topics such as design entrepreneurship / intrapreneurship, design thinking, business design, organizational culture, intellectual property, and design methods.

    One particular area of research currently being explored is the use of Cross Reality (XR) technologies – such as Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR), and Mixed Reality (MR) – in design practice, and how these technologies can support the design process through new ways of collaborating, prototyping, and testing. Another particular area of exploration is the relationship between industry and academia, specifically within design, and how partnerships between institutions and organizations contribute to innovation while fostering experiential learning in education and benefiting practitioners, businesses, and the overall economy.