Photo of Carolyn Ramzy

Carolyn Ramzy

Assistant Professor

Degrees:Ph.D. (Toronto), M.M. (Florida State), Bachelor of Musical Arts and Diploma of Ethnomusicology (Eastman).
Phone:613-520-2600 x 2403
Email:carolyn.ramzy@carleton.ca
Office:A818 Loeb Building

Dr. Carolyn Ramzy is an ethnomusicologist whose broad research interests include questions of music and belonging, citizenship, and religious nationalism. She specializes in musics of the Middle East and specifically studies the performative politics of belonging among Egypt’s Coptic Christians. Her current research explores how the popular Christian genre of taratil circulate in satellite and digital technologies as powerful technologies to mold Egyptian Coptic national and pious citizenry in the twenty-first century. Prior to her time at Carleton, she was a fellow at the American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE). Carolyn has also consulted with the U.S. Library of Congress Music Division and served as a Coptic music specialist for the Library of Congress World Digital Library.

Carolyn has presented her research at various conferences, including the Society for Ethnomusicology, the Middle East Studies Association, the American Anthropology Association, and the American Academy of Religion, the International Association for Popular Music, and the International Association for Coptic Studies. She has also published her work in Ethnos: Journal of Anthropology, the Journal of the Canadian Society for Coptic Studies, The Performing Arts Encyclopedia: Explore Music, Theater, and Dance at the Library of Congress and a chapter in Lois Farag’s The Coptic Christian Heritage: History, Faith, and Culture (Routledge, 2013).

At Carleton, Carolyn teaches courses on music and religion, globalization, and conflict. She is also cross-appointed to the Institute of African Studies (IAS), the Institute for Comparative Studies in Literature, Art, and Culture (ICSLAC), and the Pauline Jewett Institute of Women’s and Gender Studies.

Recent Publications

2016    “Autotuned Belonging: Coptic Popular Song and the Politics of Neo-Pentecostal Pedagogies.” Ethnomusicology. University of Illinois Press, September 2016.

2014    “To Die is Gain: Singing a Heavenly Citizenship Among Egypt’s Coptic Christians” Ethnos: Journal of Anthropology. Routledge Press, 2014.

2013    “Performing Coptic Expressive Culture,” The Coptic Christian Heritage: History, Faith, and Culture, edited by Lois Farag. Routledge Press, 2013.

2010    “Taratīl As Popular Music and the Transformation of a Coptic Folk Genre.” Journal of the Canadian Society for Coptic Studies. Volume 1, (2010) Gorgias Press.

2010    “The Copts and Coptic Music: An Introduction,” Coptic Orthodox Liturgical Chant & Hymnody; The Ragheb Moftah Collection at the Library of Congress. Washington, D.C.: The Performing Arts Encyclopedia: Explore Music, Theater, and Dance at the Library of Congress Website, 2010  www.loc.gov/performingarts/.

2010    “Notating Coptic Music: A Brief Historical Survey.” Coptic Orthodox Liturgical Chant & Hymnody; The Ragheb Moftah Collection at the Library of Congress. Washington, D.C.: The Performing Arts Encyclopedia: Explore Music, Theater, and Dance at the Library of Congress Website, 2010  www.loc.gov/performingarts/.