Photo of Azar Masoumi

Azar Masoumi

Assistant Professor

Degrees:Ph.D. Sociology (York University)
Phone:613-520-2600 x 2596
Email:azar.masoumi@carleton.ca
Office:A711 Loeb Building

About

Azar Masoumi is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. She holds a PhD in Sociology from York University. Before joining Carleton, Azar taught at the Department of Sociology at Acadia University.

Azar studies the politics of state-controlled refugee protection, particularly in relation to gender-based and queer refugees. She has published on sex and sovereignty, limitations of feminist legal change, race and neoliberalism, and state multiculturalism. She is currently working on a research project on language interpretation services for Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity refugees in Canada. Azar is a member of the Canadian Council for Refugees and an affiliate of the Centre for Refugee Studies at York University.

Selected Publications

Masoumi, Azar. Forthcoming. “‘Some Nice Latin American Music Will be Played by a Tape Player’: Anti-racist Critique and the Multicultural State.” Social Identities.

Masoumi, Azar. 2019. “The Politics of “Doing Exactly Nothing”: Feminist Legal Change and Bureaucratic Administration of Refugee Protection.” Feminist Legal Studies 27 (3), 243-261.

Masoumi, Azar. 2019. “The Battle of Numbers: Refugee Protection, Race, and Neoliberal Politics of Bureaucratic Efficiency.” Oñati Socio-Legal Series. Published online.

Masoumi, Azar. 2019. “‘Come Out and Be Free!’: Coming Out and the (International) Government of Sexualities.” In Governing the Social in Neoliberal Times, edited by Deborah Brock. University of British Columbia Press.

Masoumi, Azar. 2018. “Compulsory Coming Out and Agentic Negotiations: Toronto QTPOC Narratives.” In Queering Urban Justice: Queer of Colour Formations in Toronto, edited by Jin Haritaworn, Ghaida Moussa, and Syrus Marcus Ware. University of Toronto Press.

Masoumi, Azar. 2016. “(Stop) Deporting Pegah: Sovereignty, (Public) Sex, and (Life)/Death.” Social Justice 43 (4), 22-43.